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  • I have a dream.

  • I had a dream.

  • I have a wish.

  • I have a hope.

  • I'm going to teach you the difference between two words in English that are confusing, probably

  • be...

  • Because in your language, the words are very similar; if not, used the same.

  • Portuguese, for example.

  • These words are: "wish" versus "hope".

  • Dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh.

  • The challenge is to figure out how they're different.

  • So, "wish" and "hope" are both verbs, and they're actually both regular verbs, so: "I

  • wished" and "I hoped".

  • And they both mean that you want or you desire something.

  • So, you think: "Wow, okay.

  • Well, in my language, oh, we use them the same.

  • Oh, maybe they're a little bit different.

  • I don't know.

  • How are they different?"

  • Let me tell you.

  • In English, if you can remember this: "wish" is for stars.

  • So we have a common expression that: "When you wish upon a star".

  • A star, I don't mean a Hollywood actor or actress; I mean the beautiful twinkly things

  • in the sky are called stars.

  • So, we usually wish upon a star.

  • We think: "Wow.

  • I wish I had a million, trillion thousand dollars."

  • Yeah.

  • And the star goes: "I don't care.

  • I'm a star.

  • I can't get you anything."

  • But the reason why this is a wish is because it's unreal.

  • You want 10 billion dollars.

  • Well, guess what?

  • It's near impossible that you're going to get that, unless you work hard or rob a bank.

  • If you'd like to rob a bank, please give me some money; just as a little, like, donation

  • - that would be fine.

  • "Hope" is for dreamers.

  • So, do you have a dream?

  • Maybe you would like to learn English.

  • You're on the right track.

  • Maybe your dream is to travel; that's my dream.

  • Maybe your dream is to achieve your goal.

  • So, if you can remember this: A "wish" is for a star, which means it's unreal; it's

  • not going to happen.

  • And "hope" is for dreamers - this is real; with some effort, you can achieve your goal.

  • So, "wish" is for stars; "hope" is for dreamers.

  • And we have another very important function of "wish".

  • It's grammar, but that's okay; you're good.

  • We can use "wish" for unreal things that you want, but depending on the verb, it'll tell

  • us what time period you are talking about.

  • So, if you wish you had something or you want something right now...

  • Maybe you are...

  • Were...

  • Maybe you're playing basketball and you're watching this lesson.

  • Let's say you're playing basketball, and you're like: "Wow.

  • I wish I were taller."

  • Unfortunately, you cannot be taller just like this.

  • I think there are pretty invasive surgeries you could have to elongate your legs, but

  • it's just not going to happen; I'm sorry.

  • Or maybe you go: "Wow!

  • I wish I could speak English fluently."

  • Yeah, me too.

  • But the only way you could do that is you practice, so that's not unachievable, but

  • it's near impossible; even for me.

  • "I wish I had"...

  • So this is famous, like: "I wish I had 10 million dollars."

  • Yeah, you don't; sorry.

  • "I wish I knew".

  • I wish I knew famous people, then I could go to their house, we could hang out, have

  • some food, go in their swimming pool.

  • It'd be fun.

  • But guess what?

  • I'm sorry, you don't.

  • So these things are something that you want now.

  • We're going to use simple past as a verb, so the structure: Subject "wish", subject,

  • simple past verb and a noun or an adjective, like "taller".

  • Okay?

  • It's something that you want to have now, but you probably won't get it.

  • Ha-ha.

  • Dreams are shattered.

  • If it's something that you thought about in the past, in English we would call it a mistake

  • or a regret.

  • So: "mistake" or "regret" means something that you did or didn't do in the past, and

  • now you think: "Uh-oh.

  • I..." or "she"; you can use different subjects.

  • "She wishes...

  • She wishes she hadn't eaten all of the chocolate", because now her tummy hurts.

  • So she wishes that in the past she hadn't have done something.

  • Okay?

  • With this grammar, you're going to use the past perfect.

  • Past perfect is either: "had" or "hadn't" plus pp.

  • "Pp" in English grammar means the past participle.

  • And the past participle is difficult to learn, but you can do it.

  • So, I can say: "Oh.

  • He wishes he had bought a different car."

  • But he didn't.

  • He bought this car, but he's like: "Oh, damn!

  • I should have bought the other car."

  • Sorry, you've made a mistake or you've made a regret.

  • So, when we use the past perfect with "wish", which is "had" or "hadn't" plus the past participle,

  • it's a mistake in the past.

  • So, in English we have present, past, and then future.

  • When we use future, we're going to use the modal verb "would".

  • So, I can say: "They wish"-so many people wish-"they would", a base verb and the noun;

  • something in the future.

  • Something in the future that they want.

  • So: "They wish they would go to Spain."

  • Ah, but they can't.

  • Okay?

  • "They wish they would have more food tomorrow", but they can't.

  • So, depending on what kind of verb we use will depend on how we talk about our wishes.

  • If we use the simple past, we're talking about something we want now; if we use past perfect,

  • we're talking about something that happened in the past that is a mistake; and if we talk

  • about the future, we're going to use "would".

  • What's your wish?

  • What's your dream?

  • Tell me your wish and tell me your hope.

  • What's something that you hope you can actually do?

  • Dreams are not unobtainable; you follow your goal and you don't give up.

  • And make a wish when you're at it; maybe that star will answer you.

  • I'm out of here.

  • Wishing you a great day.

I have a dream.

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A2 dunh star dunh dunh unreal mistake participle

WISH & HOPE: What's the difference?

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    Summer posted on 2021/11/06
Video vocabulary