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  • Hi. My name is Ronnie, and I'd like to share a little story with you. So, nice;

  • story time with Ronnie. I lived four years in Japanbeautiful country,

  • wonderful people, good mountainsand one thing that really shocked me was the

  • job-interview process, and the amount of information that people were asked and

  • give in job interviews.

  • So, for example, in Japan, I remember on resumes, people had to give their

  • picture, their age, maybe their marital status. And I found this to be very

  • strange, because in Canada and in North America, this just can't... just don't

  • give your picture. Because I'm sure that people will judge you on your appearance

  • in a job interview. Even just looking at your resume, like: "Well, this one's

  • gorgeouslet's hire him." You can't do that. And we have really strict laws

  • about this in North America, so I'm here to walk you through some.

  • You have to be aware that there are many questions that the interviewer cannot

  • ask you; based on race, age, gender, appearance. There's also the problem

  • that you have to know enough not to talk about them yourself. So, for example, if

  • you're a new mothercongratulations, you just had a babyand you're going

  • for a job interview, don't mention the baby. Okay? It's not illegal to say that

  • you don't have a baby or say you have a baby, but it's just a very dodgy subject

  • to talk about at a job interview. It makes you look very unprofessional.

  • You're there to talk about your job, and you getting a new job; not about your

  • newborn baby. So, you have to watch out for professionalism.

  • If you get involved in talking about things that are or can be seen as

  • discriminatory, not a good situation. You have to watch out for legal issues.

  • And you have to be aware that the standards in North America might be very

  • different from your country. They could be similar, but they could be very

  • different. So, pay attention, make sure you know the game before you run it.

  • Mm-hmm. Run the race. Practice.

  • So, discrimination based upon gender. "What do you identify as?" They're not

  • allowed to ask your sex. "Who do you live with?" Again, trying to determine

  • your gender can be caused as discrimination or can be looked at as

  • discrimination. "How are you related to the people you work with?" Again, it

  • seems that these questions are leading to: "What's your gender?" which, again,

  • is discrimination. They cannot discriminate against you based on you're

  • a male, you're a female, you're... choose to identify with whatever you

  • choose. It's just wrong.

  • Also, they cannot discriminate against you based on appearance. As I mentioned

  • to you in Japan, and I know in Korea as well, you put a picture on your resume.

  • And I know people are sitting there, going: "Nah, this one. Nah. Oh, this

  • one's cute. Let's hire her. Whoa, look at this guy's eyes. Let's hire him." You

  • cannot do this. Appearance. You're not allowed to talk about how much you

  • weigh, your height; unless it is very, very specific to the job. If you're

  • going for a job for the tallest person in the world, they can ask you your

  • height. But if it's a general question, if you have to meet some height

  • requirement, they can ask you: "Do you measure up to six-two?" or "Are you

  • taller than three point five?" if it's required for the job. It's very

  • important to stress that. "Do you have any disabilities?" If this is brought

  • up, again, it can be seen as discrimination. "Are you pregnant?"

  • Never, ever ask a woman if she's pregnant. Okay? I don't care what social

  • situation you're in, but especially in a job interviewagain, it can be seen as

  • discrimination.

  • We have age discrimination. So, depending on how old or young someone

  • is, they could be denied a job; again, unless it's a legal requirement. In

  • Canada, if you're under 18 years of... of age, you cannot work in a bar

  • legally, so they can ask you: -"Are you of legal age to work in Canada in a

  • bar?" -"Yes." That's perfect. They can't ask you specifically how old you are.

  • "When's your birthday?" No. "What year were you born? What year did you

  • graduate?" If they know what year you graduated, and they're good in math,

  • they're going to know your age. Maybe they are concerned about someone being

  • too old for a job, or too young for a job, which is that way. "When did you

  • get your first job?" Mathematically, they can figure out how old you are. So,

  • these questionsvery, very dangerous. Be careful.

  • As far as availability goes, your schedule; scheduling. So, they're not

  • allowed to ask you if you can work on evenings or weekends. That seems

  • strange. Why? Because this gets into religion and your marital status. "Do

  • you have children?" They can't ask you that. It doesn't matter what religion

  • you are, you can't talk about that; it's not their business. Working at night,

  • working evenings, working in weekends can kind of determine your religion.

  • Marital statusmarried, single, divorced, widowednone of their

  • business; not allowed to give that information.

  • And this is a huge one: "Are you planning to have a family?" I know, in

  • Japan, if you were planning to have a family or you were pregnant, they would

  • not hire some people because they thought that they weren't loyal to the

  • company; they would just work there for a little bit, get pregnant and leave.

  • Also, when I was in Japan about 10 years ago, when women actually were pregnant

  • and had children, some companies didn't allow them to work anymore. Oh, hello.

  • In North America, this is very, very wrong. They cannot do that to you.

  • Another big thing is your ability to work. "Do you have a work visa?" Okay?

  • They can ask you that. But they can't ask you about your citizenship or your

  • background, your parents. They can't ask you to see a birth certificate because

  • where you were born has nothing to do with you getting a job. They can't ask

  • you to see citizenship papers. They can ask you for a work visa or work permit,

  • because that's the law, but they can't ask you about anything about your

  • family. Oh, it says: "Why do you speak French?" Hmm. Why do you want to know if

  • I speak French? This has to do with discrimination on a citizenship level.

  • It's not your business why I speak French, unless of course, you are

  • applying for a job as a French-English translator or a French teacher. Hmm.

  • Maybe this is an appropriate question to ask.

  • So, I highly suggest that you know, with the back of your handthat's an

  • expressionwhat things are okay to be talked about in a job interview, even on

  • your part. Because if you start going off: "Oh yeah, you know, I was born here

  • and..." Oh, you've given them too much information. So, please be careful. But

  • good luck out there. You can get this job. Just know your rights.

Hi. My name is Ronnie, and I'd like to share a little story with you. So, nice;

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Job Interview Discrimination in North America

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    Summer posted on 2021/11/06
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