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  • - Hey, what's up, guys?

  • Welcome back to Binging with Babish

  • where this week we're taking, oh, whoa,

  • we're taking a look at me I guess.

  • Oh my.

  • Hello, my name is Andrew Rea aka Binging with Babish

  • and I'm here to answer your questions via Twitter.

  • This is Cooking Support.

  • [calm music]

  • @ndwelch asks,

  • "why do they always use kosher salt in cooking videos?"

  • Well, I'll tell you, Nathan.

  • There are really three salts that you need to know about.

  • There is table salt,

  • the one that you're probably most familiar with,

  • kosher salt and flaky finishing salt.

  • I like to call table salt baking salt

  • 'cause that's really all I use it for

  • because most recipes are developed using table salt

  • but that being said,

  • it's not a great way to season your food when you're cooking

  • because you can't pinch it.

  • Kosher salt on the other hand,

  • you have complete control over.

  • So you can see right now I have a big old pinch full of it

  • and there's no salt coming out of my fingers

  • until I start to twist my fingers from left to right.

  • It's also a more forgiving salt.

  • It's a bigger grain of salt.

  • You're less likely to oversalt your food

  • than you would be with table salt

  • and then this is the totally optional salt.

  • These are very light, flaky.

  • Ugh.

  • Really all you use it for is finishing.

  • That's why it's called finishing salt.

  • These two though, absolute necessities.

  • Just know when to use them and why and how.

  • Oh, in all caps.

  • "People don't keep eggs in the fridge?

  • Don't they go bad faster?"

  • As far as I understand

  • and please take what I'm saying with several grains of salt

  • because this is your food safety we're talking about here

  • and you shouldn't trust a guy

  • who doesn't have food safety certification,

  • never went to culinary school,

  • went to film school, got really bad grades

  • and kinda lucked into his job as a food influencer.

  • You shouldn't be listening to me.

  • The eggs that you need to refrigerate

  • are ones that have been commercially washed.

  • Here in the States, they wash eggs with great rigor

  • and that strips away the sort of natural protection

  • on the outside of the shell so they must be refrigerated.

  • If you got them from the side of the road

  • and they were not in the fridge,

  • chances are, they just came out of a hen's ass

  • and they're ready to stay at room temperature

  • in your stylish barn converted backsplash kitchen.

  • Anyway.

  • @ol_daveyboy, "cooking twitter, what are some good knives

  • that won't immediately break the bank?"

  • Well, I'll tell ya.

  • Sorry.

  • I do have a line of cookware out, okay?

  • It's called Babish Cookware line, all right?

  • Okay?

  • These are German steel knives.

  • They're full tang blades.

  • They are 4116 German steel.

  • They come sharp.

  • They keep an edge and they're $25, 25 to $30 per knife.

  • That being said, I'm not here just to huck my cookware.

  • Huck, is that the word?

  • I'm not just here to sling cookware.

  • I'm also gonna be fully honest

  • about other brands that I like.

  • Victorinox Fibrox makes a great starter knife.

  • It is stamped, not forged.

  • Likewise, withsthof's Pro line, it's so cheap.

  • It's $20 for a knife.

  • It's a great learning knife.

  • It's a great starter knife but these knives are great too.

  • @FollowerOfDole says, "time to ask a chef.

  • When I make fluffy scrambled eggs and cheese,

  • fluffy is I tried to make an omelet and screwed it up,

  • my dish is oily?

  • I think it's oil from the cheese

  • because the eggs are cooked fully

  • but it's kinda buttery flavor.

  • It's good but how to fix?"

  • So I'm guessing you're doing is adding the cheese too early

  • so it's getting too much heat from the pan

  • so it's going beyond the point of melting and it's breaking.

  • When it breaks, it basically means

  • that the oil just seeps out of it.

  • What I would do is try to add your cheese

  • as late as humanly possible.

  • Just don't overheat it

  • and don't use cheeses that are too old.

  • Use a Gruyere or a not too sharp, pretty mild cheddar

  • 'cause they're better melters.

  • They're gonna stand up to the heat better.

  • Tablespoon and a half of butter in the pan.

  • Eggs.

  • Always crack on a flat surface

  • then throw the pan back on the heat.

  • Before it gets in the pan, gonna beat these guys up.

  • I'm gonna use the tiny whisk.

  • They're more homogenous now

  • so now we're gonna add them to the pan.

  • Keep 'em moving.

  • Keep the pan moving.

  • Keep the eggs moving.

  • You put this on toast and it's almost spreadable.

  • There we go, that's done.

  • Irish cheddar.

  • We'll put a fair amount in there.

  • This is probably two ounces.

  • Yeah, two ounces-ish.

  • We're just mixing them in there, keeping 'em moving

  • and letting the residual heat in the pan melt the cheese

  • and incorporate them into the egg.

  • This is how I like my scrambled eggs.

  • You might not like 'em this way.

  • I like 'em creamy, I like 'em spreadable

  • and no matter how you like your scrambled eggs,

  • if you add your cheese at the end

  • and don't heat the cheese directly on the stove top,

  • you will notice that there's not a hint of oil

  • or grease in this pan.

  • It is just egg and cheese.

  • Nothing has separated

  • and that's how you prevent cheese from breaking.

  • Mm.

  • @DutchessWoodall said,

  • "kay, what y'all season your ribeyes with?"

  • Salt and pepper, man.

  • Salt and pepper.

  • For the most part,

  • you're just hitting it with salt and pepper.

  • Maybe a sauce or something on the back end.

  • Steak seasonings, the shakers and all that stuff,

  • not so much.

  • bforboss9 says, "people give me all of your advice

  • on how to cook large slabs of meat so it won't dry out.

  • The dog is now getting my three pound pork roast

  • 'cause I dried it out."

  • A lot of things could be happening here.

  • First off, you might be cooking it

  • at too high a temperature.

  • You might be just cooking it for too long.

  • Pork, you can cook to a rosy 135

  • if you know where the pork is from and if you trust it.

  • Otherwise, cook it to 145.

  • It's still gonna be nice and rosy and pink in the middle

  • and it's gonna be super juicy.

  • Something like a pork loin

  • which doesn't have much extra muscular fat,

  • you need to be very careful to make sure

  • that you're not overcooking it

  • 'cause that's how it dries out very fast.

  • If you overcook it by 10 degrees,

  • it's gonna be dry as a bone.

  • You need to cook slowly, gently

  • with big, big joints of meat.

  • The best way to make prime rib for example

  • is to cook it at like 250 degrees Fahrenheit

  • for like six hours.

  • Also, yeah, pull the meat 10 degrees shy

  • of where you want it to end up.

  • It will come up 10 more degrees

  • at least when it comes out of the oven.

  • @hawaiianseawich, "if you're cooking shrimp...

  • why do you leave the tails on?

  • Why?

  • It's so [beep] inconvenient when you're eating

  • and you have to use your hands to pick off the tails

  • to make sure you get all the shrimp out.

  • Yes, I just recently had shrimp pasta and I'm mad about it."

  • It is absolutely inconvenient.

  • You're right to be mad about it.

  • Having shrimp tails on in pasta is ridiculous

  • because if you don't wanna eat with your hands,

  • you're out of luck.

  • You have to use your hands in some capacity

  • if you've got shrimp tails on.

  • That or you're spitting 'em out like an olive pit

  • which I don't think you wanna do in a fancy restaurant.

  • So shrimp tails in pasta makes zero sense to me.

  • I completely agree.

  • That can really go [beep] itself.

  • From @JimKuras1, "are #bayleaves a hoax?

  • I've been cooking with them for 30 plus years

  • and I'm not sure why.

  • The only thing I know about them

  • is that they're not actually supposed to be eaten.

  • #cookingquestion."

  • I personally don't fully know what they're for either,

  • these mysterious bastards.

  • From what I understand,

  • they're supposed to lighten up otherwise very heavy dishes

  • like stews and braises.

  • They also play really well with seafood.

  • You're not supposed to eat them obviously

  • but if you wanna see what they taste like,

  • you just gotta, just gotta, mm, yeah.

  • It is a minty, almost basily.

  • Yeah, you're not supposed to eat them

  • but they do play really well in stews and braises

  • and if they are a hoax,

  • they're the weirdest hoax I've ever heard of

  • 'cause these things cost like 99 cents a ton.

  • Jill Bean aka @Jili_Bean, "hardest fruit to cut?

  • Mango.

  • Anyone beg to differ?

  • Come prove me wrong.

  • #struggling."

  • Is there a harder fruit to cut?

  • Nope, I just ran through the entire list

  • of fruits in my head.

  • Mango is a very difficult fruit to cut.

  • You could peel it first

  • but I like to just kinda go at it kinda like an avocado.

  • You wanna try to get really as close to the pit as possible.

  • It's thinner than you think.

  • Same thing on the other side.

  • Really straddle the pit.

  • You're gonna wanna very carefully score this guy.

  • Do you see that sort of spread apart mango action?

  • And now that you've spread it open like this,

  • you can just kinda chop it out.

  • Try not to take any skin with you

  • but you can just sorta slice it off there.

  • If I had to sum up the technique,

  • it's like a modified avocado.

  • With the avocado, of course you remove the pit.

  • For this, you have to be just a little bit more

  • ready to lose some fruit

  • and ready to just have some weird oblong pieces

  • like this guy.

  • Meghan Spencer, @TheRealMeghanS.

  • @BingingWBabish.

  • This one's actually for me.

  • "@BingingWBabish, I've tried your bagel recipe

  • from Steven Universe twice now

  • and they don't brown up as much as yours

  • and are only bubbly and brown

  • on parts that touch the baking sheet.

  • I have a traditional oven, not a convection.

  • Do I need to be baking at higher than 425 Fahrenheit?"

  • I would say that's a good place to start.

  • Another really important thing would be to make sure

  • that the rack in your oven is in the right spot.

  • If they're only browning on the bottom,

  • I'm guessing your rack is towards the bottom of the oven

  • especially if you have an electric oven

  • that has the heating element on the bottom.