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  • - Today we're shutting off some of our vices. - Boom.

  • - Greg: Wifi. - Mitch: Beer.

  • Greg: Fast fashion.

  • Start the clock.

  • Boys, do what you want with my body.

  • With this!

  • Ah!

  • First, we need to figure out how we're getting wifi.

  • We stealing.

  • These are microbes that we cultured from our feet

  • - to make our off-grid beer. - Oh, look at that.

  • Mitch: Ew!

  • I'm gonna take on the fast fashion industry.

  • Is this a joke?

  • Science is cool.

  • Cheers.

  • Mitch: We're feeling the heat,

  • and it's not just our sexy good looks.

  • - It's climate change. - Oh.

  • Mitch: So we're taking our passion for the environment

  • out of the classroom and into the country.

  • Greg: We are going off the grid.

  • Mitch: One by one, we'll shut off our basic necessities.

  • - Aah! - Oh, my gosh.

  • Greg: And with help from our team, we will use science...

  • Mitch: For a little self-reliance.

  • Yes! It works!

  • Mitch: See ya, city, because...

  • Mitch and Greg: This is "Shut It Off Asap!"

  • These are our last beers for a while

  • because we are officially shutting off our vices, like alcohol.

  • Or wifi! Also known as "wee-fee." I'm addicted to this stuff.

  • It's also linked to my other vice

  • which is shopping online for fast fashion.

  • A gay guy once told me that swim briefs were single use, and I bought three neon ones!

  • We wanna explore the connection of these vices to the climate crisis

  • and also so if we can find some off-grid alternatives to them.

  • Cheers.

  • In order to make our own off-grid beer,

  • I'm gonna culture our own microbes to ultimately make a unique beer.

  • I'm gonna take on the fast fashion industry

  • by sheering a sheep I can actually see out of this window,

  • processing it, and dying it

  • with natural dyes found from plants around this farm.

  • In the end, I'm gonna make something like this.

  • Our devices have no wifi signal down here,

  • which we need to survive and to finish this episode.

  • But I know that the farm which is around 200 meters away

  • does have internet and has a wifi signal,

  • so we're gonna try and steal that.

  • Greg: Sometimes we forget that wifi use

  • is linked to climate change.

  • In fact, watching online video results

  • in 0.4 kg of CO2 released per hour,

  • adding up to 1.3 billion kgs of CO2 per year.

  • This is because the internet relies on data servers

  • that use fossil fuels for energy,

  • and they also need energy to be cooled,

  • as they get really hot.

  • We need to regulate tech companies

  • to use only renewable energy for their servers

  • and encourage them to build servers in colder climates

  • to decrease the need for cooling.

  • Some companies have hopped on this trend

  • and now build their hot, hot servers in Iceland.

  • The farmhouse wifi is connected to the Internet via radio waves.

  • old-time technology that we still use today.

  • Most of our devices, like cell phones, tablets, and laptops,

  • use omnidirectional antennas to pick up wifi signals.

  • This allows them to be anywhere in your home

  • and communicate with your internet,

  • but they aren't optimal for really long distances.

  • So I'm gonna make a cantenna

  • with an added parabolic dish.

  • I'll build a large reflective dish

  • that will hopeful catch more of the radio waves,

  • and the parabolic curvature will focus them towards a can.

  • The can has a copper wire inside

  • which acts like the antenna in your phone.

  • I'll be making something called a Yagi,

  • which is a unidirectional antenna

  • that was invented in 1926.

  • When the wifi signal from the farm reaches my antenna,

  • this signal will be amplified by a series of metal plates.

  • A reflector at the back and five directors

  • all concentrate those waves onto our active element

  • which ultimately sends an electronic signal

  • to the dongle and then to the laptop.

  • While I begin cutting out

  • the different sized copper plates for my Yagi,

  • Greg is building the frame for his parabolic dish.

  • Greg: The first thing I have to do is cut the wood rods

  • that will hold the cantenna in the center of the parabolic dish.

  • The dish is made of mesh and plastic

  • and will collect the radio waves

  • and send them to that little copper wire in the can.

  • The copper wire's electrons

  • will get excited by the farm's focused wifi radio waves

  • and create an electronic signal that travels down the cable

  • and into a dongle.

  • The dongle interprets and translates that signal

  • into digital data which our computer uses as wifi.

  • Mitch: The Yagi antenna I'm building also uses copper

  • because copper will react effectively

  • with the wifi's electromagnetic waves.

  • The great thing about the Yagi is that it has the potential

  • to get a much stronger signal based on its dimensions,

  • which are specifically calculated

  • for our wifi wavelength and setup,

  • but its downfall is that it has to be pointed perfectly

  • in the right direction to work well

  • because its focused beam is so narrow.

  • I'm a little worried,

  • but if we get the Yagi wrong,

  • it just won't work at all.

  • I think this is one of the coolest builds that we've done.

  • My parabolic dish is ready.

  • Now I have to figure out

  • the perfect place to put this monster.

  • ( gasps ) Ay!

  • The vice that I'm most addicted to sadly is wifi.

  • Who needs it more? Greg, 100%.

  • Hands up. You got me, Mitch.

  • But we both need it in our cabin

  • to do the work that's necessary for this show.

  • You sometimes forget how much internet is integrated into your life

  • until you don't have it.

  • Greg: Mitch and I have been having one to two beers a night to relax.

  • So those are being taken away,

  • which is gonna be harder than usual.

  • Since this is my first time brewing beer

  • or brewing anything really,

  • I've been doing a bunch of research

  • and realized the first thing we need is something called wort.

  • Now not the warts that you get on your body.

  • W-O-R-T.

  • And it's basically a mix

  • of boiled barley, hops, and malt extract.

  • But the most important ingredient we need is yeast.

  • Humanity's existence is profoundly intertwined with yeast.

  • It lives on our skin, in our lungs and guts,

  • and it floats in the air that we breathe.

  • And regulating yeast through brewing and baking

  • has made it a key building block

  • in humanity's transformation from nomadic hunters

  • to a domesticated agricultural society.

  • To break down that malt extract into ethanol

  • we're looking for something called brewer's yeast,

  • and to find it, we're gonna use our bodies and our environment.

  • If we find yeast samples,

  • we can take them and culture them.

  • ( alarm blaring )

  • We're about to swab our toes, butt cracks, and skin

  • to hopefully have yeast on them.

  • - Just doing some science. - Wa-pah!

  • Aw, gross. What a freak.

  • So which do you think will actually have the best growth?

  • Greg: I think it's gonna be one of my skins.

  • I think the butt crack will show the most growth,

  • but it may not be what we actually want.

  • If we can make beer out of the butt crack, we're gonna be rich.

  • - It's gonna fly off the shelves. - I don't know.

  • ( cash register dings )

  • Mitch: Greg and I's job has been to find that yeast somehow,

  • but we also have some wort samples

  • like this one that we've placed around the farm.

  • We have this bit of cheese cloth on top so the yeast can get through,

  • but other insects or animals can't get in.

  • And the hope is that near fruit and near flowers,

  • near oak trees, might find some wild yeast

  • and be able to cultivate that and use it for our beer.

  • It'll take nine to ten hours,

  • so we'll leave the wort out overnight to capture the yeast.

  • - Look what I got. - Ooh. Thank you.

  • Mitch: Lastly, we streaked a plum

  • then added it directly into a wort bottle

  • in order to take advantage of the natural yeast on its skin.

  • Now we just have to wait two to three days

  • to see if we have enough yeast growth

  • to use for brewing our beer.

  • Greg: To make my swim briefs,

  • first I'm going to need the wool.

  • So I'm here with Rachel who's gonna teach me how to shear a sheep with this!

  • Okay, I'm so sorry. I'm freaking out.

  • - I trust you absolutely. - Okay.

  • I trust myself as a teacher.

  • We are gonna be taking the fleece off of a sheep with a razor.

  • Rachel: They have to be sheared, because once they're done,

  • you'll see how much wool comes off,

  • and that's one year's worth.

  • They want this fleece off of them,

  • so that's what I keep thinking.

  • I'm like, "I'm gonna help cool down the sheep.

  • I'm gonna help cool down the sheep."

  • I think we should just get started

  • 'cause I still have to process the wool, dye the wool,

  • and then, you know, knit it into a swim brief.

  • You're gonna become a gorgeous swim brief

  • that a gay guy's gonna wear on the beach.

  • - ( bleats ) - She just said, "I can't wait."

  • - Ready? - I love you.

  • It's like you've done this before.

  • - Once or twice. - Oh, my God, it's, like,

  • the most satisfying thing I've ever seen in my life.

  • - Ready? - I'm ready.

  • I just don't wanna cut them. I don't wanna cut them.

  • - So like this? - Yep.

  • Oh, my God.

  • Shearing sheep means we're working with natural fiber,

  • but a lot of our clothes are made with synthetic fibers like polyester,

  • and that polyester contributes to plastic waste.

  • For example, one 6 kg load of laundry

  • releases more than 700,000 microplastic fibers into waste water,

  • which means washing clothes

  • produces the equivalent of 50 billion plastic bottles

  • of waste per year.

  • All the way out with that leg again.

  • There! Beautiful!

  • My hands feel amazing. I haven't washed them because lanolin is an oil

  • that comes off the sheep when you're actually touching them

  • and shearing them, and it's good for your hands.

  • So I'm just basking in these sheep shearing hands.

  • Baby, do you feel naked and like a newborn?

  • Rachel: She says, "Oh, I feel wonderful."

  • Thank you so much. I never thought I'd do something like this.

  • Rachel: For the average Canadian sheep farmer,

  • selling that wool doesn't even pay for me to come shear the sheep.

  • So it's just something you have to do for the health of the sheep.

  • Wouldn't that be a good thing, Canadian wool? I don't know.

  • Yes, you could find it if you looked for it.

  • There are smaller producers that do have wool sheep,

  • and the majority of their sales would be private, directly to the buyer.

  • - Greg: Like making clothing? - Rachel: Exactly.

  • Greg: Now that we've sheared the sheep,

  • we need to get it into yarn that I contextualize knitting into a swim brief.

  • It's really hard to have a strong opinion about responsible production

  • when you don't understand how things are made.

  • 85% of textiles end up in landfills each year,

  • which is the equivalent of one garbage truck of clothes

  • being dumped in a landfill every second.

  • Fast fashion companies and influencer culture

  • are constantly trying to make us buy new things,

  • but if you do need to consume things,

  • honestly, second-hand shopping is incredible,

  • and you kinda carve out a little style for yourself.

  • We both have our antennas finished.

  • I am keen to try my Yagi first.

  • Our cabin's right there, but we need line of sight

  • to the farm for both of these to work,

  • so that's why we brought them up here.

  • Greg: The wifi comes to us in the form of radio waves,

  • a type of electromagnetic radiation.

  • And hopefully we'll capture those waves

  • and they'll induce an electric current in our copper antennas,