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  • The first step is to know how to make these /b/ and /p/ sounds in English.

  • So you can pronounce them correctly

  • And you know the difference between the two sounds.

  • And I'm going to teach you that.

  • Also guys, if you're serious about pronunciation, it's very important to know about the IPA spelling.

  • You can also watch how I move my mouth,

  • and of course always try to repeat after me in this video.

  • I'm sure you can master these sounds.

  • So let's do this.

  • Okay, guys.

  • Let's now practice producing the sound /b/ in English.

  • So what you're going to do, the first thing is, that this /b/ sound is voiced.

  • Which means that you're going to use your voice.

  • So when you produce the sound,

  • you are going to feel a vibration in your throat.

  • And what you're going to do...

  • is basically push out the air with your lips.

  • They should touch each other so

  • /b/

  • Okay, please repeat the sound after me.

  • /b/

  • Let's now practice with the word 'bin'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'bin'

  • 'bin'

  • 'bin'

  • Good.

  • And now let's practice producing the sound /p/ in English.

  • So /p/

  • is basically going to be the exact same thing as the /b/ sound,

  • but it's unvoiced

  • which means that you are not going to use your voice.

  • No vibration in the throat.

  • You're just going to push out the air with your lips.

  • No sound.

  • So /p/

  • Can you repeat after me?

  • /p/

  • Let's now practice with the word /pin/.

  • Repeat after me.

  • 'pin'

  • Good job.

  • Ok students, let's now practice with minimal pairs.

  • Words that sound very similar but the actual sounds are different.

  • They are very useful to help you hear the difference between the two sounds.

  • So first let's practice just the sounds.

  • Okay and I want you to repeat after me.

  • First the /b/ sound.

  • /b/

  • And now the /p/ sound.

  • Remember unvoiced.

  • Okay watch my mouth.

  • Repeat after me.

  • /p/

  • Good.

  • Let's now practice both.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • /b/

  • /p/

  • /b/

  • /p/

  • /b/

  • /p/

  • Good.

  • And let's now take our words.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'bin'

  • 'pin'

  • 'bin'

  • 'pin'

  • 'bin'

  • 'pin'

  • Excellent, guys. Moving on.

  • Let's practice producing the /n/ consonant sound in English.

  • So, what you're going to do is,

  • there's going to be air coming through your nose,

  • and you're going to block the air in your mouth

  • with the tip of your tongue.

  • So the tip of your tongue should be up there.

  • Okay watch me.

  • /n/

  • Okay, I want you to repeat after me.

  • /n/

  • Let's now use the word 'pin'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • pin

  • pin

  • pin

  • Good.

  • Let's now learn how to produce the /ŋ/ sound in English.

  • So what you're going to do

  • there's still air coming through your nose

  • and you're also going to block the air in your mouth.

  • But this time not with the tip of your tongue, but with the back of your tongue.

  • So this time, it's the back of your tongue that's going to be up there.

  • Okay, watch me.

  • /ŋ/

  • Okay, please repeat after me.

  • /ŋ/

  • Let's use the word 'ping'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • ping

  • ping

  • ping

  • Good guys.

  • Moving on.

  • Okay we're now going to practice with minimal pairs

  • - words that sound very similar but the sounds are actually different.

  • They are very useful for you to hear the difference between the two sounds.

  • First, let's focus on the sounds themselves.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • First, the /n/ sound.

  • /n/

  • And now the /ŋ/ sound.

  • /ŋ/

  • Let's now do both.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • /n/

  • /ŋ/

  • /n/

  • /ŋ/

  • /n/

  • /ŋ/

  • And now, let's practice with our words.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • pin

  • ping

  • pin

  • ping

  • pin

  • ping

  • Very good, guys.

  • First let's learn how to make this 't' /t/ sound. The 't' /t/ sound in English.

  • It's unvoiced.

  • So you are not going to use your voice.

  • You are not going to feel vibration in your throat.

  • You're just going to push out some air.

  • And for this, your tongue is going to be forward against your top teeth.

  • And then you're going to push out some air.

  • And your tongue is going to go down.

  • Okay.

  • /t/

  • Please try and do it. Repeat after me.

  • /t/

  • Let's practice with the word 'tip'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • tip

  • tip

  • tip

  • Good.

  • Let's now focus on the 'ch' /tʃ/ sound in English.

  • It's slightly different.

  • It's also unvoiced.

  • So no vibration in your throat, ok.

  • But this time your tongue is going to be up there.

  • It's not going to move

  • and you're going to release a lot of air.

  • So /tʃ/.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • /tʃ/

  • Let's practice with the word 'chip'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • chip

  • chip

  • chip

  • Good.

  • Let's now practice with minimal pairs.

  • Words that sound practically the same, but the sounds are actually different.

  • Very useful for you to hear the difference between the two sounds.

  • First, let's focus on the sounds themselves.

  • Please watch my mouth and repeat after me.

  • First, the 't' /t/ sound.

  • /t/

  • Then the 'ch' /tʃ/ sound.

  • Repeat after me.

  • /tʃ/

  • Let's do both.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • /t/

  • /tʃ/

  • /t/

  • /tʃ/

  • /t/

  • /tʃ/

  • And finally, let's practice with our words.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • tip

  • chip

  • tip

  • chip

  • tip

  • chip

  • Good job, guys. Moving on.

  • First, let's produce the /f/sound in English.

  • What you're going to do is -

  • you're not going to use your voice.

  • It's a voiceless sound so no vibration in your throat.

  • You are going to place your teeth against your bottom lip

  • and you're going to push out some air through your teeth and your bottom lip.

  • /f/

  • Okay, please watch my mouth and repeat after me.

  • /f/

  • Let's practice with the word 'fan'.

  • Repeat after me.

  • fan

  • fan

  • fan

  • Good.

  • As for the/v/sound,

  • it's exactly the same as the/f/ sound.

  • But this time, you are going to use your voice.

  • It's a voiced sound so you are going to feel some vibration.

  • Okay

  • So /v/.

  • Can you please repeat after me.

  • /v/

  • Let's practice with the word 'van'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • van

  • van

  • van

  • Good.

  • Let's now practice with minimal pairs.

  • Words that sound very very much alike but the sounds are actually different.

  • They are very useful if you really want to hear the difference between the two sounds.

  • First, let's practice producing the sounds themselves.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • First, the/f/ sound.

  • /f/

  • Now the/v/ sound.

  • Repeat after me.

  • /v/

  • Let's now do both.

  • Repeat after me, guys.

  • /f/

  • /v/

  • /f/

  • /v/

  • /f/

  • /v/

  • Let's now take our words.

  • Repeat after me.

  • fan

  • van

  • fan

  • van

  • fan

  • van

  • Good, guys.

  • First, guys, let's practice producing the sound /l/ in English.

  • So it's a voiced sound.

  • So again you're going to use your voice.

  • You're going to feel this vibration in your throat.

  • And your tongue is going to be forward.

  • okay. It's going to touch your upper teeth.

  • So it's /l/.

  • Okay? Can you repeat after me?

  • /l/

  • /l/

  • /l/

  • Let's now practice with the word 'light'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'light'

  • 'light'

  • 'light'

  • And now let's practice producing the /r/ sound.

  • It's slightly different.

  • It's also voiced.

  • So you're going to feel that vibration.

  • But your tongue is not going to be forward touching your upper teeth.

  • This time it's going to be curved.

  • So it's going to go up there.

  • Okay.

  • /r/