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  • The Pandora papers:

  • thousands of documents have been released,

  • which reveal the financial details of some of the richest

  • and most famous people in the world.

  • I'm Neil and this is News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • Joining me today is Roy. Hello Roy.

  • Hi Neil and hello everybody.

  • If you would like to test yourself on the vocabulary around this story,

  • all you need to do is head to our website

  • bbclearningenglish.com to take a quiz.

  • But now, let's hear more about this story from this BBC News report:

  • So, a large number of documents have been obtained

  • by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

  • 140 news agencies around the world are working on these documents,

  • including the BBC and the Guardian in the UK.

  • These documents expose the financial lives and money dealings

  • of many politicians and rich people around the world.

  • These documents have been called the Pandora papers.

  • And you've been looking around the various news websites

  • and picking out interesting vocabulary

  • we can use to talk about this story and...

  • and beyond the story. What have you got?

  • We have: 'leak', 'caught up in' and 'tsunami'.

  • 'Leak', 'caught up in' and 'tsunami'.

  • OK. Let's start then with your first headline please, Roy.

  • So, our first headline comes from the UK,

  • from the Guardian, and it reads:

  • 'Leak' – release of secret or private information.

  • OK. So, 'leak' is spelt L-E-A-K

  • and it can be used as both a verb and a noun:

  • 'a leak' or 'to leak'.

  • Yeah. Now, it might be useful to think of this word

  • in its more, kind of, literal sense.

  • So, for example, the other day I noticed there was a big damp patch

  • on the ceiling in my house.

  • What could that be? I called the plumber.

  • The plumber came along and said that my pipe had a 'leak'.

  • It had a 'leak': it meant that liquid was escaping from this pipe.

  • And it's useful to think about this in the same way, isn't it?

  • Absolutely. So, when water travels through a pipe,

  • it's usually contained in the pipe.

  • It's the same for gas.

  • Now, when the pipe is compromisedmaybe there's a crack in the pipe

  • water starts to come out of the pipe.

  • It's no longer contained and this word we usewe say 'leak'.

  • Water is 'leaking' from the pipe

  • or 'leaking out' of the pipesame with gas as well.

  • And it's the same idea in the headline.

  • Now, this information that we're talking about should be private or secret,

  • but it is 'leaking out'.

  • It has 'leaked' into the press.

  • Yeah, and it's not accidental, is it?

  • Somebody has decided to reveal this information,

  • but we don't often know who the person is

  • who decided to reveal the information.

  • It's often... often done by politicians who want

  • maybe they want to get some criticism aimed at a colleague

  • and they get this information released somehow

  • that makes somebody else look bad.

  • Absolutely, yeah. More... more often than not, it's intentional.

  • Now, obviously it can be an accidental 'leak',

  • but as you say it's more often something intentional.

  • Somebody wants to expose somebody or some information.

  • There is another thing we need to talk about as well.

  • Now, you may be aware there is a vegetable,

  • also called a 'leek'. It's the same pronunciation,

  • but this is spelt L-E-E-K

  • and it's a long white vegetable with green at the top,

  • and I believe it comes from the onion family.

  • Yeah. Tastes a bit like an onion, doesn't it?

  • But it's, kind of, long instead.

  • It does. It does.

  • And it's commonly used in soup: leek and potato soup.

  • But it has no... no kind of link to the word 'leak'

  • that we're talking aboutthe L-E-A-K –

  • unless there's a crack in the bowl of soup

  • and then your 'leek soup' is 'leaking'...!

  • OK. That's... that's definitely time now to get a summary:

  • OK. Well, talking about water,

  • we have a story about slippery toilets,

  • which can help save millions of litres of water.

  • What do our viewers have to do to watch that, Roy?

  • All you need to do is click the link in the description.

  • OK. Let's have a look at your next headline.

  • OK. So, our next headline comes from the UK,

  • from the Daily Mail, and it reads:

  • 'Caught up in' – involved in a bad situation unexpectedly.

  • Yes. So, the expression here is 'caught up in'

  • and this expression is commonly used with the verb 'be' or the verb 'get'.

  • So, you can 'be caught up in' something or 'get caught up in' something.

  • And it's commonly used when we're trapped in a situation that we are...

  • that is unexpected and it's a bad or annoying or awkward situation.

  • Yeah, I think there's a key, isn't there,

  • in the first word there – 'caught', which is the past tense of 'catch'?

  • And when you 'catch' something,

  • there's a sense of it being trapped, isn't there?

  • Yeah. So, for example, you throw me a ball

  • I 'catch' it in my hands and it is trapped.

  • It won't drop from there and it's exactly the same idea:

  • these people are trapped in this situation.

  • They are involved in the situation.

  • So, when they're 'caught up in' it, they're...

  • they are trapped or involved in this situation.

  • Now, it's important to mention it's often unexpected or unintentional.

  • Now, these people could have been doing something wrong

  • and therefore they didn't expect to be exposed,

  • or it could have been completely unintentional

  • and they've got 'caught up in' this situation.

  • Yeah, when you say that you're... someone is 'caught up in' a situation,

  • it doesn't necessarily mean that they are ultimately guilty.

  • Yeah, that's true.

  • And it's normally very negative.

  • Yeah It's normally negative...

  • we don't... for example, you say:

  • 'Caught up in a difficult or bad situationcaught up in a scandal.'

  • We don't... we wouldn't use it for a positive situation

  • that you were involved in: you wouldn't say,

  • 'I'm caught up in a lottery victory,' or something like that.

  • No. No, you would not, although I would love

  • to be 'caught up in' a lottery win.

  • There is another meaning of 'to be caught up in' something

  • and this is when you're so involved in something

  • that you don't realise that something else is happening.

  • So, maybe you're reading a really, really good book

  • and you're so 'caught up in' the book,

  • but your mum or your partnerthey're calling you and you don't hear them.

  • You don't realise that they're calling you

  • because you're so involved in the book.

  • Yeah, this happens to me on the...

  • on the Underground, going to work – I'll be so 'caught up in' my book,

  • I'll miss the stop and I have to get off and change train and be late for work.

  • Maybe it's... maybe it's time to set the alarm on your... on your watch

  • so you know when to get off, or stop reading!

  • OK. Let's get a summary:

  • Now, 6 Minute English has got so many fascinating topics,

  • it's impossible not to get 'caught up in' them

  • and we've got one about language,

  • which is just really interesting, isn't it, Roy?

  • Yes, it is. All you need to do to see that

  • is click the link in the description.

  • OK. Let's have a look at our next headline please.

  • OK. So, our next headline comes from the ICIJ,

  • or the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists,

  • and it reads:

  • 'Tsunami' – arrival of something in huge amounts.

  • Yes. So, this word is spelt: T-S-U-N-A-M-I.

  • Now, in English, with native speakers,

  • you will commonly hear it without the pronunciation of the 't',

  • so they say 'tsunami': the 't' is silent.

  • But it's important to recognise that this is

  • a loan word that comes from Japanese,

  • and I believe in Japanese the 't' is pronounced:

  • so, it's 'tsunami'.

  • But it's very difficult for a lot of English native speakers to say that,

  • so we just say 'tsunami'.

  • Yeah. So, a tsunami is a... is an enormous wave, isn't it?

  • So, why are we talking about huge waves when we're talking also

  • about data and financial information?

  • Well, yeah, you're absolutely right.

  • It can relate to that huge wave that washes everything away,

  • but we also use it to talk about an arrival of a huge amount of something.

  • So, for example, information or data or even people:

  • there could be a 'tsunami' of visitors to your...

  • to your city or something.

  • So, it's about an arrival of a large amount of something, which is...

  • it kind of makes sense when you're thinking about

  • the large amount of water that is arriving.

  • We also... we have other expressions

  • connected to water that have a similar meaning, don't we?

  • For example, 'deluge':

  • if you say there is a 'deluge' of something

  • 'deluge' is a very heavy downpour of rain that washes things away

  • we can talk about a 'deluge' in the same way,

  • about something that has a large impact.

  • Yes. And we can also say

  • a 'flood' of information, linking back to that water idea,

  • or a 'tidal wave' of data.

  • So, we use these water expressions

  • to talk about a huge amount of information

  • or data arriving at the same time,

  • and it's very important to say we commonly use this word,

  • like 'tsunami', to exaggerate the amount of something.

  • So, for example, I might say:

  • 'I've just had a tsunami of emails arrive in my inbox!'

  • And there might be only three or four,

  • but I'm just being a little bit dramatic and exaggerated.

  • Yeah. OK. Well, let's get a summary:

  • Time now, Roy, then for a recap of the vocabulary we've heard today.

  • Yes, we had: 'leak' – release of secret or private information.

  • We had: 'caught up in' – involved in a bad situation unexpectedly.

  • And we had: 'tsunami' – the arrival of something in huge amounts.

  • If you want to test yourself on the vocabulary,

  • there's a quiz on our website at bbclearningenglish.com

  • and you can also find us all over social media.

  • Thanks for joining us and see you next time.

  • Goodbye. Bye.

The Pandora papers:

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 caught tsunami leak pipe situation headline

Pandora Papers: Rich exposed - BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/10/05
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