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  • Hi, welcome to invade dot com.

  • I'm adam in today's video, I'm going to conclude our look at the parts of speech.

  • Now, I've made a couple other videos about now owns and adjectives.

  • Another one about verbs and adverbs.

  • Today we're going to look at pronouns, prepositions, articles and conjunctions.

  • Okay, again, there is one more that's the interjections like wow and you and ah these are all self explanatory.

  • I won't look at them.

  • So we're going to start looking at pronouns now again, just before I do that.

  • What are the parts of speech?

  • These are the categories that every english word falls into.

  • So when you have an english sentence, each word belongs to one part of speech and it's very important to recognize them.

  • So you know how to use them in your writing and your speaking and how to understand them in your reading.

  • Okay, so let's start with the pronouns.

  • There are different types of pronouns.

  • There are the personal pronouns and these are divided into subject pronouns and object pronouns.

  • So I is a subject pronoun is going to be used in the subject position in a sentence or in a clause.

  • Okay, I you he she it they the object just like it sounds is going to be used in the object position of a clause or sentence me, your him, her, etcetera, sorry, me, you, him, her.

  • It's them.

  • Okay, so it's very important to understand the position, the type and position of the personal pronouns and then you have the other pronouns, the adjective pronouns and again, very important to remember that.

  • These are adjectives.

  • They will be followed by a noun.

  • My house, my friend.

  • Right, So this is just an adjective.

  • You still need the noun to go with it.

  • So my your his her.

  • Its uh there okay, possessive.

  • This is now a noun.

  • So it's used in the same way as the adjective except that it's a noun.

  • So this house is mine, this friend is mine, Okay.

  • And we're using it in a different position.

  • So mine, yours, his hers, it's theirs and reflexive.

  • So basically just add self to all the adjective ones, myself, yourself, himself, herself except etcetera.

  • Just remember themselves.

  • Okay, listen, let me write that down.

  • Don't forget that you're changing it to a plural because them is a plural and yourselves or yourself depending demonstrative pronouns.

  • This that these those these are talking when you're talking about pointing at something.

  • These can be used as adjectives or as announced depending on how you're you're building your sentence, then you have indefinite pronouns meaning that you're talking about people in general or things in general or places in general.

  • Every every person or everybody both of these are pronounced every All each.

  • Some any, There are quite a few of these but their indefinite means there is not any particular one person.

  • Place thing, relative pronouns.

  • So when you have an adjective clause, the conjunctions that begin the clause, but that also act as subjects in that clause in that relative clause are called relative pronouns.

  • So who, which that etcetera and then interrogative when you have a question, Who did it?

  • Right.

  • So the who is the interrogative pronouns?

  • So again very important to understand the words.

  • You're looking at what part of speech they are.

  • Now A big reason to understand parts of speech is because if you're having any problems with any one particular word that you're just not sure how it works.

  • If you recognize it's part of speech, it's also much easier to look it up in a grammar book or online or to ask your teacher how this part of speech works in general.

  • Right?

  • And as I mentioned with the other parts of speech, especially with the verbs and with the adverbs.

  • You should I highly recommend that you get yourself a very good grammar book to learn all the different pronouns, how to use them when to use them, how to adapt them to whatever context you're working with.

  • Then we're going to look at articles.

  • Articles are very straightforward because there's only three of them.

  • There are only three of them.

  • There are there is a definite article.

  • The and the indefinite articles or n the difference between ah or an is the word that follows it.

  • If the word that follows it begins with a vowel and if it begins with a consonant.

  • Ah but you also have to be careful it has to be a consonant or vowel sound, right?

  • So you have um uh U.

  • F.

  • O.

  • Although you is a vowel.

  • The sound is is a why?

  • Why is a consonant?

  • So uh Ufo um an M.

  • R.

  • I scan now an MRI.

  • Why?

  • Because this is an acronym.

  • We don't say the actual word.

  • So it sounds like em are I sort of like that?

  • Right?

  • So you're going with this sound, M E.

  • And MRI.

  • So keep that in mind now definite.

  • The very simple explanation is specific, indefinite general.

  • So the house, I know which house we're talking about our house could be any house.

  • Now I know I'm very much simplifying article.

  • Use articles can be very very tricky to english learners but again you need to get yourself a good grammar book and learn all the different rules on how to use articles.

  • Okay but just remember that articles are part of the speech are a part of speech and you need to know how to use them and how to recognize them when not to use them, et cetera.

  • Okay so now let's look at prepositions and conjunctions.

  • Okay so now we're going to look at prepositions and conjunctions.

  • We're gonna start with prepositions.

  • So prepositions.

  • These are the little words that you see all over the sentence and you see them in basically every sentence and they are called they are prepositions but they are function words.

  • Each of these prepositions has a function.

  • Some of them have more than one function.

  • Some of them have only one function.

  • Again you have to learn how to use them.

  • So for example in in has more than one function it could be used to talk about place, it could be used to talk about time for example.

  • Okay.

  • And what I mean by function words, these prepositions help you relate or help the writer, the speaker, the reader relate events and time and events and direction or things and time things in place.

  • So we have direction, we have method, so direction too method by time in on at place.

  • In on at Okay, so all kinds of different functions and a lot of prepositions.

  • So for example of on in at on for about two above among with the list is very long.

  • Some of them can be very confusing.

  • So for example, I know that a lot of students have a problem between four and two.

  • Now there's a video on Ingrid.

  • Actually I made a video about the difference between four and to which you can watch didn't understand the difference but the point is that you need to study each of these words and for those of you who are going to be taking a test for example and you need to write the prepositions.

  • I've seen so many mistakes, Okay, make sure you know how to use the prepositions because they can change the meaning of a sentence.

  • Their small words but they're very important words and again get a good grammar book that has a lot of exercises that you can learn how to use these prepositions.

  • Okay, next we're gonna talk about conjunctions.

  • So there are essentially two types of conjunctions, coordinating conjunctions, where you're going to be joining two independent clauses and but so excuse me or for yet nor some people like to remember these by calling it fanboys, if that helps you remember them, that's fine.

  • Four as a coordinating conjunction, a little bit old fashioned.

  • Not used so much anymore, You should still know how to use it But remember two independent clauses when you want to join an independent clause, two dependent clause or subordinate clause, you're going to use a subordinating conjunction, when, which that although if and remember subordinating conjunctions are going to be in three types, you're gonna have a noun clause, an adverb clause or an adjective clause or a compliment, but again, that's always going to be with that.

  • Okay, so which conjunction you're going to use, depending on which type of clause you're going to use and what the purpose of the clause is right now, this is all part of parts of speech if you really need help with individual aspects of parts of speech, if you need help with articles if you need help with conjunctions.

  • If you need help with verbs and adverbs keep in mind that Yes, a good grammar book is very useful but the best resource on the best resource you possibly have is right here, what you're doing right now in vid dot com.

  • Let me write that down for you just in case you're not sure where you are.

  • Go to England dot com.

  • Look for the search box on your phone, on your pc, on your laptop.

  • There's a search box at this site, type in the part of speech that you want to study and there is probably at least one video about this topic.

  • You want to learn about?

  • Articles, We have videos, you want to learn about conjunctions?

  • We have videos, we are here to help you improve your english.

  • If you, a lot of students asked me, where do I start, where do I start to learn?

  • English parts of speech is where you start, make sure you understand what is a noun, make sure you understand what is a verb, different types of verbs, different tenses, adverbs, adjectives, prepositions, pronouns, articles, conjunctions, make sure that you understand every word that you're going to be using, that you're going to be hearing that you're going to be reading and we have over 1000 videos to help you with every part of speech.

  • Okay, so go look for these videos, watch them, take the quizzes, ask the questions, learn english be better english users now having said all that.

  • If you have any questions about conjunctions or prepositions or pronouns or announce verbs, adjectives, please go to invade dot com.

  • You can also look at for the forum under the video and ask me questions and I'm very happy to answer your questions about english.

  • And there's also a quiz where you can practise recognizing the different parts of speech and watch more videos.

  • Ask more questions if you like the video, subscribe to my Youtube channel, you will get more new videos, beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, all kinds of topics to help you improve your english.

  • Okay, I'll see you again soon with a new lesson.

  • Bye bye.

Hi, welcome to invade dot com.

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A2 clause speech adjective noun sentence grammar

Parts of Speech in English Grammar: PREPOSITIONS, PRONOUNS, CONJUNCTIONS, ARTICLES

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/09/28
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