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  • stare at this image for five seconds and without realizing it, the photo receptors at the back of your eyes will start to become fatigued.

  • So much so that when this image turns white you see the green birds as red and the red background is green.

  • All of this happens because of biological processes in your eyes that link you to the lives of pollinating insects.

  • Can help you design bedrooms or rooms in your house to be more satisfying.

  • And can also explain why women can see better than men seeing colors.

  • So fricking cool kind of mixes science with sensation.

  • And over millions of years our eyes have evolved to see wavelengths on the electromagnetic spectrum roughly between 380 nanometers to around 700 nanometers.

  • That's it, wavelengths longer than this.

  • You get into radio waves and microwaves, which our eyes cannot see.

  • But they can send a text wavelengths shorter than this.

  • You get into UV rays and gamma rays.

  • Again, your eyes cannot see, but they can damage your cells and cause cancer.

  • But if we hone in on the wavelength of color, there are specific patterns that our eyes pick up.

  • Most people see less than 450 nanometers as violet.

  • 450 to 485 nanometers.

  • As blue.

  • 500 to 550 nanometers.

  • As green.

  • 572 590 nanometers as yellow 5 92 6 25 nanometers.

  • You got gold, 625 nanometers and above you get rid.

  • Now no object actually possesses any color Which is so weird to say, all an object does is absorb certain wavelengths of light and then reflect others.

  • For example this gorgeous teal, seafoam, coral blue is absorbing all the colors except for that seafoam teal, gorgeous blue which is being reflected to your eye and your brain is interpreting this that's color.

  • For example if you're looking at one of my favorite flowers, the golden rod which blooms in august.

  • The flowers are absorbing every wavelength of light.

  • Except for the ones between 590 to 625 nanometers again as we said earlier which most people see as gold.

  • This light is sent to your cornea which bends it towards the pupil that controls the amount of light hitting the lens which focuses the wavelengths onto the back of your eye.

  • Called the retina.

  • At the back of your eye.

  • The retina is covered in photo receptor cells called cones.

  • You have around six million cone cells which absorb light and pass it on to the brain's visual cortex to be interpreted as color.

  • This is a biological process that's happening all the time.

  • You're looking at this screen.

  • I'm looking at this blue sky, you're looking at me.

  • I'm looking at you one.

  • Oh this is what connection my friends now.

  • Your cone cells at the back of your are divided into three different types.

  • You got red cone cells, green cone cells and blue cone cells, R.

  • G.

  • B.

  • Since you have three types, you are visually try chromatic.

  • So you can walk around order your coffee and say by the way you were try chromatic.

  • Some other animals, for example are tetra chromatic and can even see within the UV wavelengths.

  • Some birds, some fish which I'm sorry are cooler than mess.

  • That's a wrap thing to do.

  • They are superheroes.

  • We are um usually try crow mats.

  • Sit down folks because the science is complicated but the red cone, optimal for perceiving the color red, the blue cone optimal for receiving the color blue and you guessed it.

  • The green cone, optimal for perceiving the color green.

  • But these cells work in combination for you to see over 10 million different colours unless you're 12% of women who can see way more than that more on that later.

  • But the nature of these cone cells are what creates complementary colors that we perceive as satisfying.

  • Now a compliment is something that lacks a whole.

  • So for example, this circle is a complement of this rectangle with the missing section together, they make a hole.

  • That's a whole W.

  • H.

  • O.

  • L.

  • E.

  • Not a whole like here here here are a couple down here.

  • If I showed you the ones down here, we'd be on a different tube site according to the physics of light, a complementary color for your I.

  • R.

  • Two colours that when combined produce white light.

  • It's a law of nature.

  • It's fascinating.

  • That's why we have complementary colors for our eyes.

  • And it has to do with how our cones work.

  • Look at this black and white image if we put on the complementary colors of the original picture and you stare at this dot for a few seconds due to the specific stimulus on your eye.

  • The background we used and the perception of your red, green and blue cone receptors.

  • When we put back this black and white image, you see the color.

  • I do this all the time.

  • Just for fun.

  • I'm like gosh, dang on my eyes and brain are insane.

  • The reason that this happens is because your eyes are so sensitive to these wavelengths that the cones become overused and oversaturated when looking at the same color.

  • The stimulus can start to spread to other cones nearby.

  • And when the stimulus has taken away the tired cones and your visual cortex default to seeing the complementary colors.

  • This is why we love looking at complementary colors beside each other.

  • They have energetic reciprocity going back to this image when staring at the green, your green and blue cone cells become fatigued.

  • But the red isn't really being used in these sections.

  • So when you switch to white, your brain reads these sections as red.

  • The red cones start to trigger your brain to see red.

  • It's all just about perception.

  • It's wild because it's like through these two little things that I'm seeing everything.

  • And living my life, purple and gold are a reciprocal pair that are try chromatic eyes and the eyes of bees see very similarly golden rod and purple asters grow together so that bees find them attractive and this increases their pollination.

  • These flowers evolved to grow together to help pollination with bees.

  • They weren't for us.

  • But because of the energetic reciprocity of our cones being similar to that of bees, we get to reap the benefits of this energetic beauty when looking at flowers when you see gold and you see purple and it feels good.

  • Thank the bees when designing a room.

  • Take a look at this light complementary color wheel.

  • If you focus on the compliments of each other throughout your room, you're going to be designing pleasing scenarios for the cones of your eye.

  • This can really help you make decisions about how you're going to design your room.

  • Just think about the physiology of your fricking brain.

  • Now for men, seeing color can be more of an issue.

  • This is because the genes that encode red and green cones show high sequence symbology on the X chromosome.

  • So although gender and sex can fall on a spectrum.

  • For the most part, people who identify as women have X.

  • X chromosomes and people who identify as men have Xy chromosomes and it's this Y chromosome.

  • For people like me who have a Y chromosome, we are more likely to not be able to see red and green as well.

  • This is why statistically men are much more likely to be colorblind.

  • But on top of this, there's a lot of new research but it is starting to be found out that 12% of women are actually Tetra chromatis.

  • They have an extra cone and can see 100 times more color than the rest of us have gone to a rabbit hole of all this research after being in nature and just looking at all these beautiful colors that were so soothing to my I my brain, my perception and it almost just looks like what is beauty science has a hard time defining beauty.

  • Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • But when you look at these complementary light color wheels, you start to realize there are some things we can do in our lives to better understand the physics of light, our eyes and our brain and utilize this thinking to benefit our lives essentially.

  • This is just a video enticing you to get out there and of course stop and smell the flowers but also stop and look at those flowers.

  • Thank you to skill share for sponsoring this video and they are giving a free one month premium membership of skill share to the 1st 1000 people who click the link below.

  • So you've got to click a fast ball skills shares an online learning community where you can learn new things from the safety and comfort of your own home.

  • My biggest passion in life is learning and skill share is a huge asset to me.

  • I cannot recommend skill share enough.

  • This video exists because I was spending more time in nature because of a skill share course called Urban Nature Journaling, seven days of artistic problems, essentially what it taught me to do was look around at nature in a new way.

  • It's a beautiful course that honestly kind of changed my life and my perspective of the city that I live in.

  • It also got me journaling, which has made me feel better essentially, skill share literally changed my life.

  • Again, it's an online learning community with tons of new class is great for curious people who want to feel inspired.

  • They're also always updating new premium classes, so depending on what your interests are, you can find something for you, skill share is dedicated to learning.

  • So lucky for you, for me, there are no ads.

  • So again, be one of the 1st 1000 people to click the link below And you'll get a free skill share premium membership for one month.

  • Also by clicking this link, you're able to help our show here at a sub science, thanks for watching and we'll see you next week for a new science video.

stare at this image for five seconds and without realizing it, the photo receptors at the back of your eyes will start to become fatigued.

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This Is Why Women See Better Than Men

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/09/16
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