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  • Last week Tuesday was the first day

  • of the new school year and it was a stressful day.

  • Teachers were stressed because they didn't know

  • if they were totally ready to start teaching.

  • Students were stressed out because they didn't all know

  • where their classrooms were.

  • It was certainly a stressful day for a lot of people.

  • So I thought I should do an English lesson about stress.

  • If you don't know what stress is,

  • stress is a feeling you have.

  • It's kind of a combination of feeling anxious

  • and having anxiety and being nervous

  • and being worried about something new that's starting

  • or just things in life that you are going through.

  • So in this English lesson, I will talk to you

  • about how to express feelings of stress

  • and I'll also teach you some English phrases

  • that we use when we talk about stress.

  • (bright music)

  • Well, hello and welcome to this English lesson about stress.

  • I hope the lesson doesn't stress you out,

  • but I think it's a good idea for us

  • to talk a little bit about stress

  • and how to express it in English.

  • Before we get started, though,

  • if this is your first time here,

  • don't forget to click that red subscribe button

  • and give me a thumbs up if this video helps you learn

  • just a little bit more English.

  • So in general, if you are feeling anxious

  • and you are feeling a lot of anxiety

  • and if you're worried and you're a little nervous,

  • you can express that in two ways

  • and it's very, very simple.

  • You can say, "I'm stressed."

  • Or you can say, "I'm stressed out."

  • They mean exactly the same thing.

  • I'm not sure why we have the second version,

  • but I actually think it's the more common of the two.

  • So if I was in a situation where I was feeling

  • all of those emotions, I would choose

  • one of those two ways to express it.

  • I would either say, "I'm stressed."

  • Or I would say, "I'm stressed out."

  • You can also use the same two expressions

  • to be specific about what you're stressed about.

  • Let's say you have a test tomorrow.

  • You could say,

  • "I'm stressed because I have a test tomorrow."

  • You could also say,

  • "I'm stressed out because I have a test tomorrow."

  • Those two sentences mean exactly the same thing.

  • You could say something like this,

  • "I'm stressed because I have a job interview next week."

  • Or, "I'm stressed out

  • because I have a job interview next week."

  • Both of those phrases, I'm stressed and I'm stressed out,

  • meaning exactly the same thing and you can use them

  • to talk specifically about what you're stressed about.

  • If there are situations in life that happen routinely,

  • where you experienced stress,

  • we usually use the verb to stress out,

  • or we say to get stressed.

  • Here are some examples, you can say,

  • "I stress out when my boss gives me too much work."

  • Or, "I get stressed when my boss gives me too much work."

  • For me personally, I stress out

  • when I don't have enough time in my day

  • to finish my English lesson.

  • I get stressed when I don't have enough time

  • in my day to finish my English lesson.

  • So, when you're talking about things

  • that happen over and over again,

  • things that happen regularly or routinely,

  • things that give you stress, we usually say stressed out,

  • or we use the verb, to get stressed.

  • If there is a person or thing in your life

  • that causes your life to be stressful,

  • we can also use the verb to stress out,

  • but we can kind of invert the sentence a little bit.

  • You could say something like this,

  • "My cousin stresses me out."

  • Maybe your cousin is the kind of person where,

  • when you're around them, you're constantly feeling stressed.

  • You would say, "My cousin stresses me out."

  • Maybe you really, really don't like big storms,

  • you could say, "Big storms stress me out."

  • So you can also use the verb to stress out,

  • but you can flip the sentence and you can talk about someone

  • or some thing that causes you stress.

  • And then of course, we have the adjective, stressful.

  • You can use the adjective stressful

  • to describe things that cause stress.

  • You can say things like this,

  • "My English class is stressful."

  • I hope your English class isn't stressful, but if it is,

  • that's how you would describe it.

  • If you feel stress when you go to your English class,

  • you would say, "My English class is stressful."

  • Maybe you have an English test coming up

  • and you could say, "It is stressful right now

  • to study for my English test."

  • I am experiencing a lot of stress, it is stressful.

  • So, when you want to describe something that causes stress,

  • you can always use the adjective, stressful.

  • So let's look at some English phrases related

  • to the feeling of stress.

  • One of the things that causes stress in my life

  • is I tend to leave things to the last minute,

  • or I tend to do things at the last minute.

  • Both of these are because I tend to procrastinate.

  • When you procrastinate,

  • it means you have lots of time to do something,

  • but you do all of the work or most of the work immediately

  • before that work has to be done.

  • So I am always guilty of doing that.

  • I often leave things to the last minute,

  • or I often do things at the last minute,

  • which are both just bad habits to have.

  • Hopefully you are not like this.

  • Hopefully you plan ahead.

  • Hopefully you do things ahead of time

  • and you do them in a timely fashion.

  • Please, I hope you're not someone who leaves things

  • to the last minute or does things at the last minute,

  • just a bad habit.

  • One thing that causes stress is being too busy.

  • You might have a lot on your plate

  • or you might have a lot on your mind.

  • When you have a lot on your plate,

  • it means you're very, very busy.

  • You probably have a lot of work to do.

  • Maybe you have a lot of errands to run.

  • Maybe life is just very, very busy.

  • You have a lot on your plate.

  • Maybe you have a lot on your mind,

  • when you have a lot on your mind,

  • it doesn't mean you're busy in the sense

  • that you're doing a lot of activities.

  • It means that you have a lot of things to think about.

  • Maybe you're worrying about a sick relative.

  • Maybe you're preparing for a test.

  • Maybe you have to do a whole bunch of errands

  • and you're not sure what you exactly have to do.

  • You have a lot on your mind.

  • So, being busy can be one of the things that causes stress.

  • You might have a lot on your plate,

  • or you might have a lot on your mind.

  • Stress can also be caused by other people.

  • You might be under pressure

  • to get something done on time at work.

  • You might be under the gun to get things done on time.

  • Don't worry, there's no actual gun involved.

  • But when you say that you are under pressure

  • or you are under the gun, it means that your boss

  • or someone who is in charge of you

  • is trying to get you to work really hard,

  • to get something done in a timely fashion,

  • to get something done on time.

  • When you are under pressure to get stuff done on time,

  • it can be very, very stressful

  • and it can cause a lot of stress.

  • So, it doesn't always have to be you

  • that's causing the stress in your life,

  • sometimes it's your boss, or your manager,

  • or your supervisor, or maybe someone in your family.

  • Well, hey, thanks for watching

  • this English lesson about stress.

  • This is actually one of those lessons

  • where I hope you learned a lot of new words and phrases,

  • but I hope your life is stress-free

  • and that you don't really need to use them very often.

  • A little bit of stress in life is okay,

  • but I hope none of you have huge amounts

  • of stress in your life.

  • But anyways, thanks for watching.

  • Remember, if this is your first time here,

  • don't forget to click that red subscribe button over there

  • and give me a thumbs up if this video helped you learn

  • just a little bit more English, and if you have the time,

  • why don't you stick around and watch another English lesson?

  • (bright music)

Last week Tuesday was the first day

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How to Talk About Stress in English | An English Phrase Lesson

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    nao posted on 2021/09/14
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