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  • Hey, I'm Rachel from Rachel's English  and today I'm going to teach you  

  • some of the more advanced vocabulary  and terms that were used in a CNBC  

  • story about what went wrong with the  Coronavirus vaccine rollout in the US.

  • When a vaccine for Covid-19  was designed and tested,  

  • many Americans thought that waiting for  life to return to normal would soon be over.  

  • Instead, there was more waiting to doWhy? Let's watch this 35-second news clip.

  • Here's what went wrong with the  US Coronavirus vaccine rollout.  

  • And how a new White House plans to turn things  around. On May 15th 2020, the Trump administration  

  • launchedOperation Warp Speedto accelerate  development, production and distribution of  

  • Covid-19 vaccines. Its goal was to have 20  million Americans vaccinated by the end of  

  • 2020. But once it came time to get shots into  people's arms, the Trump Administration turn  

  • the reins over to the states. This meant state and  local health officials were left to piece together  

  • a massively complicated rollout operationWithout federal guidance or additional resources.

  • Vaccine rollout. Let's hear that sentence again.

  • Here's what went wrong with the US Corona virus vaccine rollout.

  • Rollout is a noun, this means to introduce something such as a new product to the public.

  • The vaccine was ready and made to be distributed; it was time for the rollout.

  • As a verb, here's a sample sentence: The cellphone company is getting ready to rollout 5G service.

  • Rollout is also a phrasal verb with  a completely different meaning. I  

  • rolled out of bed at 5AM this morning.  I was sleepy I could hardly stand up.

  • Or, the bus rolled out of the  parking lot at 2:30 sharp.  

  • The bus left the parking  lot, it departed, rolled out.

  • Vaccine rollout. Let's hear that sentence again.

  • Here's what went wrong with the US Coronavirus  vaccine rollout. And how a new White House  

  • plans to turn things around. On May 15th  2020, the Trump administration launched  

  • Operation Warp Speedto accelerate developmentproduction and distribution of Covid-19 vaccines.

  • This bit tells us that the US federal  government was planning to oversee the  

  • whole process from start to finish. From  research, design, testing, mass producing  

  • and giving it to individual people, but that's  not what happened. Let's break this part down.

  • The Trump administration  launchedOperation Warp Speed”.  

  • Lauch is a verb meaning to start or set in  motion. We use it generally when starting a  

  • really big project or program. For example, I'm  launching my new book next week. That's actually  

  • not true. I don't have a new book but I do have an  old book. Check it out at RachelsEnglish.com/book.  

  • It's also commonly used to mean to  throw forward or send of an object.

  • NASA is launching its newest rocket to Mars.

  • Operation Warp Speed. Warp speed is another space  Science reference. If any of you have watched  

  • part of the Star Trek TV seriesno doubt you've heard this term.  

  • It means faster-than-light travel of  the highest speed possible. Warp speed.

  • On May 15th 2020, the Trump administration  launchedOperation Warp Speed”  

  • to accelerate development, production  and distribution of Covid-19 vaccines.

  • Its goal was to have 20 million Americans  vaccinated by the end of 2020. But once it came  

  • time to get shots into people's arms, the Trump  Administration turn the rains over to the states.

  • The Trump Administration turned the  reins over to the states. So the federal  

  • government gave control of the rollout to the  individual states. It turned the reins over.  

  • I can think of 3 different meanings for the  same pronunciation and different spelling so  

  • be careful here. We have R-E-I-N-S. Reinsthese are the long leather straps or rope that a rider  

  • uses to guide an animal like a horse. Pull  back on the reins to slow the horse down.

  • We also have R-E-I-G-N-S, reigns. Royal  authority or governing power. The Queen  

  • reigns as a representative of  the state but not the ruler.

  • Then we also have the most common, R-A-I-N-S,  rains, water as drops falling from the clouds.  

  • It rains almost every day in April. All  three of these words are pronounced the same.  

  • R consonant, a diphthong, and z, [ɹeɪnz].

  • In this clip, we're hearing the first spelling, to  turn the reins over. This means to give control or  

  • power to someone else. This idiom comes from  horses. To have the reins control the horse and  

  • you pass them to someone else to control. You  can also say: Take the reins, hold the reins,  

  • grab the reins, pass the reins. Of coursethis isn't limited to riding an actual horse.

  • The CEO took the reins of the company last  month. Or: I need help with this project;  

  • I have too much other work to doCan I pass the reins on to you?

  • You know there are a lot of idioms  related to horses in English.  

  • Horses used to be the central part of our lifeThey were our transportation. I actually thought  

  • of a bunch of idioms with horses one day whenwas dressed up as a horse and I made a video going  

  • over these idioms that you can watch at the end  of this video, it's a classic. Let's keep going.

  • State and local health officials were left  

  • to piece together a massively  complicated rollout operation.

  • State heads to piece together a massively  complicated rollout operation. Have you ever  

  • done a jigsaw puzzle? One with a thousand pieces  maybe more? Ilike this idiomTo piece together”  

  • to describe a very complex problem with lots of  parts and details that need to come together.

  • I might also say, put together,  

  • figure out, carry out, piece togetherAnother sample sentence: The police had to  

  • piece together reports from several witnesses  to get and accurate account of what happened.

  • Or: After we talked for a few minuteswe pieced together our connections  

  • and realized we had metyears earlier at a conference.

  • Piece together, a great expression  to use here since the vaccine rollout  

  • involved so many details to make happen. On the  newsclip, a doctor explains some of these pieces.

  • That really requires an assembly line-like  setup, it requires several weeks of planning,  

  • requires to make sure complex storage is connected  to individuals that the other end of the process  

  • and for places that don't have all of that  infrastructure and that expertise they really  

  • need more technical assistance from the federal  government and unfortunately operation won't  

  • speed only really seem to focus on the Science  and ultimately the development and approval  

  • of these vaccines but not the logistics  around distribution and administration.

  • First he mentions and assembly line-like set upAn assembly line, this is something that you might  

  • see in a factory, an arrangement of machinestools and workers that get a large quantity  

  • of a product put together quickly. The product  goes down the line and everyone does their step.

  • Another piece is complex storage. The vaccines  can't be just shipped in a box. They have to be  

  • kept at a very, very cold temperatures. A typical  freezer won't do the job for some of the vaccines.  

  • Let's skip to another report. I'll put links to  both of these news clips in the video description.

  • In this report, CNBC is talking about  how commercial airplanes were used to  

  • solve a piece of this rollout puzzle. Large  commercial aircraft were used to transport  

  • PPE. That is personal protective equipment  and vaccines in addition to FEDEX and UPS.

  • Normally US mail and Amazon packages and  

  • various other things from live animals  to electronics are all flying below us.

  • Because so many planes have been taken outairlines have been using especially their larger  

  • aircraft to carry only cargo. They're pretty  much desperate to find revenue wherever they can.

  • In March of 2020, airlines were even  transporting some cargo in passenger seats  

  • to help distribute PPE equipment  at the beginning of the pandemic.

  • Listen for 2 reductions with linking in  this clip. And. We very often drop the d.

  • US mail and Amazon packages. And Amazon.

  • US mail and Amazon packages--

  • And various other things. And  various. No d, linked together.

  • And various other things

  • Dropping the D in this word is more  common than pronouncing it. And Amazon.  

  • And various. Let's look at  2 more common reductions.

  • Because so many planes have been taken out--

  • Because.

  • Because so many planes have been taken out--

  • Because. This word can be reduced to cuzwithout the first syllable. Here we do  

  • hear the first syllable but it's said  very, very quickly. Because, because.  

  • You can think of there is being no vowel in the  first syllable just a quick b sound b'cuz, b'cuz.

  • Because so many planes have been taken out--

  • Dropping the H at the beginning  of certain function words is also  

  • really common on both casual  and professional speech.

  • Here we have an example where  the word have becomes ǝv.

  • Because so many planes have been taken out--

  • Other words where this might happen, had  becomes ǝd. Has becomes ǝz. Him becaomes im.  

  • Her becomes ǝr and he becomes I.

  • If you want some examples and  reductions like these interests you,  

  • I do have a whole course dedicated to them in  my online school, Rachel's English Academy. I  

  • always tell people, if you want the most bang  for your buck, practice reductions like these.  

  • Bang for your buck means getting a lot for  what you put into something. Time studying  

  • on reductions and stress is really going to impact  how natural you sound speaking English. So visit  

  • Rachelsenglishacademy.com to see more. Okaylet's check out the final clip in this video.

  • Because so many planes have been taken outairlines have been using especially their larger  

  • aircraft to carry only cargo. They're pretty  much desperate to find revenue wherever they can.

  • In March of 2020, airlines were even  transporting some cargo in passenger seats---

  • Did you catch a reduction  of an adverb? Listen again.

  • especially their larger aircraft--

  • Especially. If you look it up in a dictionaryyou're going to see that this is a four-syllable  

  • word with stress on the second syllable  but with the ly adverbial suffix,  

  • it's really easy to drop the schwa right before  the suffix so especially becomes especially,  

  • especially. Four syllables become three. This  happens in other words too. Let's take finally  

  • becoming fainly. Three syllables dropped to  two. That's a more common pronunciation.

  • Necessarily. Necessarily becomes necessarly,  

  • necessarily. Five syllables becoming four.

  • It's perfectly fine not to drop the  schwa to do the full pronunciation  

  • but you'll hear these reductions by  native speakers in all sorts of contexts.

  • Reductions make our speech a little bit more  smooth and connected and that's always a

  • top priority as you roll out your plan for  American accent training. Now, let's get to  

  • this video from the past. A video from the vault  where I went over nearly 20 idioms relating to horses.

  • And that's it for today's lesson. Thanks  for watching and don't forget to subscribe  

  • with notifications. I make new videos every  Tuesday and I love to be your English teacher  

  • so come on back. That's it and thanks  so much for using Rachel's English.

Hey, I'm Rachel from Rachel's English  and today I'm going to teach you  

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 rollout warp operation trump administration administration speed

Learn English With News: Advanced Vocabulary & Phrases | Rachel's English

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    Summer posted on 2021/08/24
Video vocabulary