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  • - This video is sponsored by Brilliant.

  • The robots are coming.

  • You've read the headlines, of course,

  • you've heard all the hyperbole,

  • the robots are coming and well,

  • you'd better batten down the hatches

  • and stock up on the canned beans

  • because they're coming for our jobs

  • and for some jobs, well, that's absolutely true.

  • The transportation industry,

  • just to give you one example will largely be powered

  • by self-driving tech in the near future,

  • obviating the need for human drivers

  • and for something that might hit a bit closer to home,

  • for those of you with more desk-bound jobs,

  • there are now algorithms that can even write news reports.

  • In fact, in 2016, the Washington Post's Heliograf Bot

  • wrote over 850 sports articles. And that was four years ago.

  • How long until robots can create convincing online videos?

  • In fact, how do you even now that I'm human?

  • It's not all bad news though, and don't worry,

  • I'm actually human. I'm not a robot.

  • Like you, I enjoy ingesting organic material,

  • both for enjoyment and refreshment, and hydration.

  • Necessary, but more importantly,

  • there is a simple rule that you can follow

  • to ensure that your opportunities for employment

  • and success in your career continue to be plentiful,

  • even as automation tech improves

  • and competition for jobs heats up.

  • It's called the five hour rule. And in this video,

  • we're gonna explain exactly what it is

  • and how you can use it in your own life.

  • But first let's set the stage with a little story.

  • Hey Charles, can I trouble you for one of those flashback

  • sounds real quick?

  • - Sure thing. (piano music)

  • - It's 1978, and all over the world

  • accounting clerks are recording data

  • in spreadsheets, except these spreadsheets

  • are written on paper, physical paper,

  • and even a small recalculation can require hours

  • spent tediously erasing and refilling cells,

  • which is a huge reason why these clerks

  • are employed full-time.

  • One year later, the world's first

  • electronic spreadsheet is released.

  • It's called VisiCalc,

  • and it becomes known as the world's first killer app.

  • Just as Halo made the Xbox a must-buy back in 2002,

  • VisiCalc helped make the Apple Two computer a success.

  • It also erased hundreds of thousands of jobs.

  • All those accounting clerks who had once made their livings

  • writing, erasing, and rewriting data

  • into paper spreadsheets,

  • saw their jobs taken over by VisiCalc

  • and its many successors,

  • which could do the work much faster.

  • But that's not the end of the story.

  • While it may be true that there are 400,000 fewer

  • accounting clerk jobs in the US today

  • than there were back in 1980, it's also true

  • that there are now over 600,000 additional

  • regular accounting jobs.

  • While the electronic spreadsheet may have eliminated

  • some kinds of jobs, it also created others as well.

  • With the ability to quickly make changes

  • and run calculations on a computer,

  • the demand for high level accounting, financial analysis,

  • and a lot other really quite nerdy services,

  • but also quite useful services, went way, way up.

  • Accountants can now do things that were either impossible or

  • at the very least very time consuming in the past.

  • As the podcaster Tim Harford once put it,

  • "Automation reshapes the workplace in ways

  • much subtler than a robot took my job."

  • Automation can also lead to the creation of jobs

  • that involve more creativity and more strategic thinking,

  • both of which humans are pretty good at.

  • But that also leads us to a conclusion.

  • If you want to succeed in an automation-driven future,

  • then you must keep learning.

  • You have to maximize your ability to think creatively,

  • and you have to become adept at working

  • with these new tools and systems.

  • And it's not just automation driving this need

  • for increased learning either. If automation is the rock,

  • then our increasingly connected economy,

  • which enables remote work and a vastly larger talent pool

  • is the hard place. If you rest on your laurels,

  • you'll find yourself caught between them.

  • And that brings us to the five hour rule.

  • This rule simply states that you should dedicate one hour

  • per day to learning, five days per week.

  • The author Michael D. Simmons came up with this rule

  • after observing that Ben Franklin dedicated one hour

  • per day on his daily schedule to reading

  • and generally expanding his knowledge.

  • He also noticed a similar pattern in figures

  • like Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates,

  • and Warren Buffett.

  • His conclusion is that the constant

  • among all these people's success

  • is their commitment to continually learning,

  • improving their skills and their general knowledge

  • across the entirety of their careers and by doing so,

  • they're always opening themselves up to new opportunities.

  • They're never resting on their laurels.

  • So that's really the five-hour rule, in a nutshell.

  • It's an incredibly simple idea.

  • In fact, you could print it on a tee shirt.

  • And in fact, I actually do,

  • but there are probably two big questions sticking in your

  • mind right now, one of them being, how do I make time

  • for constant learning, especially if you're somebody

  • who's really busy with work already.

  • And number two, what should I be learning?

  • So what I want to do with the rest of this video is answer

  • both of those questions.

  • And let's first start with how to make time.

  • First, you have to acknowledge the trade off.

  • In Simmons' article about the five hour rule,

  • he notes that Franklin's daily hour of work

  • actually caused him to accomplish less

  • in terms of short term productivity.

  • However, over time, the gains he made

  • through that constant learning accelerated,

  • they added up, and they propelled him to greater heights

  • than that extra hour ever could've.

  • Franklin understood that learning, constant learning,

  • is a longterm investment.

  • All right, onto more practical advice,

  • starting with this tip, which is upside down, I guess.

  • But do it first thing in the morning.

  • If you find it hard to make yourself disciplined enough to

  • do your independent learning after work,

  • then get up a little bit earlier in the morning

  • and do it first.

  • I have found that like the blood pooling into my head,

  • making me less and less eloquent and able to think over time

  • as I do this particular shot,

  • as the day wears on, my willpower tends to go down.

  • But if I have a deadline or a boss,

  • or some kind of assignment hanging over my head,

  • the lack of willpower doesn't matter so much.

  • So, take advantage of the maximized willpower

  • at the beginning of the day and do your learning then.

  • Secondly, work to eliminate low value activities

  • from your life. See, even if you've made that trade off

  • acknowledgement in your head, on an individual day,

  • it's quite easy to say,

  • I just don't have time for that hour of learning.

  • I just have so much work to do.

  • And this is also a justification we tend to use

  • for skipping workouts, particularly when it's leg day.

  • But I would encourage you to examine that claim for yourself

  • and if possible, test it.

  • And you can actually do this using an app like Rescue Time,

  • which will track the time you spend

  • on the apps and websites that you go to.

  • And when you see just how much time you spend

  • on things like social media or mindless YouTube binges,

  • of which this could be one, well, you're going to find out

  • that you do in fact have the ability to cut some of those

  • low value activities from your life, and make time

  • for that hour of learning.

  • That brings us to question number two.

  • What should you be learning

  • with this dedicated daily learning time?

  • Well, since we're talking about

  • increasing your career opportunities,

  • even as automation takes over more and more low level jobs,

  • I wanna talk about three specific types of learning.

  • First learning that directly impacts the skillset

  • you're currently using in your career.

  • For example, as a YouTuber,

  • my main technical skillset is making videos,

  • setting up lights, turning on the camera,

  • all that kind of stuff. As a YouTuber,

  • the technical requirements for getting videos made are

  • pretty low, but that didn't stop me

  • from taking a full week earlier this year

  • to read this workflow guide put out by a company

  • called Frame.io, and this is a hundred thousand word guide

  • that goes through the process used by professional

  • filmmaking teams, like actual Hollywood studios

  • and documentary crews, and helps them

  • get their bigger works completed,

  • and put onto platforms like Netflix

  • or even big screen movie theaters.

  • And not only does this guide go through the entire process,

  • starting with filming, going to editing,

  • covering color grading, sound, VFX,

  • it also gets into really technical territory,

  • exploring color spaces, and bit depth, and garbage mattes,

  • and all kinds of stuff

  • that I've really never heard of before,

  • or at least had never explored. And again, as a YouTuber,

  • my productions are a lot smaller and I didn't really need

  • to learn this stuff in order to do my job,

  • but learning it improved my craft.

  • I was actually able to learn some things that helped me

  • to make the workflow that we use for my channel

  • a lot more efficient. For just one tiny example,

  • we found, after reading this guide, that the video codec

  • we were filming with was actually pretty bad for editing.

  • And that was why we were having a lot of sluggishness

  • in Premiere Pro. Well, one of the reasons why,

  • the other reason being Premiere Pro.

  • But once we changed to a more edit friendly codec,

  • things got a lot better.

  • And if this example teaches you anything,

  • it's that no matter what field you're in,

  • there's always some area where you can broaden

  • or deepen your knowledge. So go find it.

  • Secondly, we have learning that decreases domain dependence.

  • Essentially domain dependence is what happens when a person

  • has a ton of expertise and skills in one particular area,

  • but they have an inability to transfer those skills

  • to new fields, even if the two fields

  • have a lot of underlying similarities.

  • And people with domain dependence are not very adaptable,

  • but luckily the fix here is pretty simple.

  • You just need to take your skills that you already have

  • and spend some time applying them to challenges

  • that are slightly different than what you're used to.

  • In other words, you want to put yourself

  • in what's called a wicked learning environment,

  • which is the opposite of a kind learning environment.

  • Kind environments have well-defined rules

  • and often perfect feedback mechanisms

  • that show you exactly what you did wrong

  • when you made a mistake.

  • The game of chess is a great example here,

  • but if you spend all of your time

  • in environments like these,

  • then you're never really developing your ability to deal

  • with unforeseen challenges.

  • So find a way, at least sometimes,

  • to make your learning environment a bit more wicked.

  • For instance, switching up the tools that you use sometimes.

  • I've found that the time I've spent building spreadsheets

  • and big formulas in Google Sheets has actually made me

  • better able to think about the templates

  • and databases that I build inside of Notion.

  • These are two very different tools,

  • but they share a lot of the same underlying structures.

  • And I found that time spent in either one makes me better

  • at both of them. Finally, we have time spent learning skills

  • that I think everyone should know.

  • These are skills that will both improve your life,

  • but also sometimes expand your career opportunities.

  • I'm talking about skills like public speaking,

  • like being able to evaluate statistics well,