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  • Here are seven life lessons I learned from Stoic philosophy, in the form of a letter

  • to myself.

  • (1) Wisdom is realizing what you can and can't control.

  • In the past, when you've tried to get into better shape, you found that focusing on the

  • things you couldn't controlsuch as your cravings for food, your body fat percentage,

  • or your weightled to zero progress.

  • Instead, it often led to feelings of shame and guilt.

  • But when you focused on the things you could controlsuch as finding fun workouts, moving

  • each day, and looking for new, healthy, and satisfying foods to eatyou made better

  • progress on your health.

  • Everything in life falls into one of two categories: things you can control and things you can't.

  • When you focus on the things you can control, you actively shape your future, but when you

  • focus on the things you can't control, you are imprisoned by your past.

  • (2) Your emotions depend on your expectations.

  • Let's say you're expecting to get a D on a test.

  • If you get a C, you're gonna be happy because your reality is greater than your expectation.

  • If you get an F, you're gonna be sad because your reality falls short of your expectation.

  • But if you're expecting to get a B on that same test, now a C will make you sad, and

  • only an A will make you really happy.

  • Your emotions equal your reality minus your expectations.

  • (Emotion = reality - expectation).

  • (3) Right perception leads to right action.

  • If I told you a million dollars were buried in your backyard, you'd go out there and

  • start digging right now, and you wouldn't stop until you found it.

  • Your actions arise from your perception of the world.

  • So right perception leads to right action.

  • (4) Your relationships will make or break your life.

  • In the light of recent worldwide events, this lesson is easier to understand than ever before.

  • The line that separates your health from someone else's health is very thin, perhaps nonexistent

  • in the long run.

  • You depend on the tree for your oxygen, the farmer for your food, and the builders for

  • your home.

  • And all of these entities depend on you too.

  • If you drag people down to climb higher, the people around you will learn to do the same.

  • And soon, you will be surrounded by people who do nothing but pull each other down.

  • But if you lift people up with you, the people around you will learn to do the same, and

  • soon, you will be surrounded by people who always lift each other up.

  • In reality, all things are in relationship, directly or indirectly, and the quality of

  • your life is inseparable from the quality of your relationships.

  • (5) Being attached to what other people think of you will rob you of your potential.

  • I made a full video on this topic which you can check out by clicking the link in the

  • top right of this video or using the link in the description below.

  • But basically, the most valuable thing you can do is be yourself.

  • Like a tree, you don't need to do anything but be yourselfyou don't need to do anything

  • but truly thriveto be of use to the world.

  • But if you're attached to what other people think of you, you'll be what they want you

  • to be rather than being yourself, and by abandoning yourself, you abandon your full potential.

  • (6) Your values determine whether your internal life is peaceful or stressful.

  • If you value money but don't have any, you'll spend your life in a stressful chase to get

  • it.

  • But if you value the process of creating useful things instead, you'll spend your life in

  • peace.

  • And you'll spend your life in peace because you can create something useful at any time.

  • Nothing is stopping you.

  • You already own the thing you value: your own action.

  • If you value something that you don't currently have, your life is full of stress until you

  • get it.

  • But if you value something you currently have, your internal life is peaceful.

  • (7) The most valuable things are available in the present.

  • What's more valuable than knowledge?

  • Isn't it the quality that leads to knowledge in the first place?

  • Let's call it curiosity.

  • What's more valuable than a strong body?

  • Isn't it the quality that leads to strength?

  • Let's call it determination.

  • And isn't the quality that leads to money more valuable than money itself?

  • Let's call it usefulness.

  • You acquire knowledge, a strong body, and money through time, but the qualities that

  • will lead you to these rewards, which are more important, require no time to achieve.

  • Curiosity, determination, and usefulness are available now.

  • What is acquired through time can be taken away through time, but what can be achieved

  • instantly can never be taken away.

  • If you have the right qualities, you will never lose your way.

  • And if your compass is oriented properly, you'll always find your treasure.

  • Whatever is most valuable, whatever is the thing from which all good things come, whether

  • it's virtue, truth, justice, love, or some other name, it's available in the present.

  • It's available in every moment.

  • It requires no time to acquire, or achieve, or act upon.

  • It requires no learning, no money, no status, nothing special.

  • It can be achieved right here, right now.

  • And if

  • you really want it, you'll find it.

Here are seven life lessons I learned from Stoic philosophy, in the form of a letter

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7 Life Lessons I Learned from Stoicism

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    Summer posted on 2021/07/30
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