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  • Vanessa: Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Are you ready to expand your vocabulary?

  • Let's go.

  • Vanessa: It's a fact, the more vocabulary you know, the more you can understand natural

  • English conversations.

  • So today I'd like to help you understand and use 15 advanced English expressions for daily

  • life.

  • These aren't phrases specifically for business, though of course you could use them in those

  • situations.

  • These aren't all slang expressions or expressions to make you sound really educated.

  • No, these are expressions for daily life.

  • They're ones that I use all the time and I hope that you'll be able to integrate into

  • your daily conversations as well.

  • All of the phrases that you're going to learn today are part of my monthly course, The Fearless

  • Fluency Club.

  • Some of these expressions I took from lessons in 2018, some are from lessons from 2019,

  • some are from 2020.

  • But today they are for you.

  • If you would like to learn 15 to 20 new expressions just like this every month, feel free to click

  • up here to learn more about my course, The Fearless Fluency Club.

  • Vanessa: During today's lesson, I challenge you to try to say all of the sample sentences

  • out loud with me.

  • This is going to help you get used to hearing your voice using the expressions and also

  • help your pronunciation muscles, help you have a chance to speak and also help you to

  • remember them, which is always a challenging thing with new vocabulary, right?

  • So make sure that you speak out loud today.

  • Try to repeat some of these sentences with me.

  • I have a feeling that some of these expressions are going to be new for you.

  • So let's get started with the first one.

  • Vanessa: A false sense of security, carrying mace gave me a false sense of security.

  • Can you guess what this means from the sentence?

  • Carrying mace, which is like pepper spray or a minor weapon, gave me a false sense of

  • security.

  • Well, I feel secure, I feel safe, but in reality, danger is near.

  • If I were in a really dangerous situation, carrying mace or pepper spray is probably

  • not going to help me too much.

  • It gave me a false sense of security.

  • Vanessa: His wife didn't argue with him about his drinking, but this was a false sense of

  • security.

  • She would blow up one day.

  • Blow up means get extremely angry.

  • This is a pretty common thing that happens in relationships unfortunately.

  • One person has a problem and the other person doesn't say anything about it, so that person

  • thinks, "Oh, maybe it's not a problem.

  • Maybe it's fine, maybe he or she doesn't care."

  • This is a false sense of security because probably the other person is building up some

  • strong feelings and will just explode in anger one day.

  • So make sure that you don't have this false sense of security.

  • All right, let's go to the next expression.

  • Vanessa: To bounce ideas off or to bounce ideas off of.

  • The word of here is just optional.

  • Let's look at a sample sentence and I want you to guess what you think it means.

  • It's a good idea to bounce ideas off of your coworkers.

  • When a ball bounces, it goes down and then it comes back up.

  • Well, when you bounce ideas off of a coworker, you're getting some feedback and opinions

  • from someone.

  • You're bouncing ideas off of someone.

  • In the sentence, you can just as naturally say it's a good idea to bounce ideas off your

  • coworkers or it's a good idea to bounce ideas off of your coworkers.

  • The word of is completely optional.

  • Both are correct.

  • A common question in business is, can I bounce some ideas off of you?

  • And this means that you have some ideas, you would like some feedback about it, especially

  • if the other person has more experience than you.

  • This is a really polite way to say, "Hey, can I ask you some questions and get some

  • feedback?"

  • You can just simply say, "Can I bounce some ideas off of you?"

  • Great.

  • Beautiful sentence.

  • Vanessa: The next expression is wise, but this is just a suffix.

  • That means that we put it at the end of another word.

  • Take a look at this sentence.

  • Safety-wise, my city is pretty safe, but education-wise, we could use some improvement.

  • You're introducing each category with the word safety, but then you're adding wise to

  • show I'm talking about this category.

  • Safety-wise.

  • My city is pretty safe, but education-wise, we could use some improvement.

  • It's not so good.

  • So on the topic of education we could use some improvement.

  • When my friends ask how old my students are.

  • Well there is quite a range of ages of people who learn online.

  • Vanessa: If you teach a class of adults about coding, like how to make software code, you

  • might say, "Well, age-wise," you're introducing this category with the suffix wise.

  • "Age-wise my students are around 40 years old."

  • Okay, cool.

  • Or, "Age-wise, my students are generally 18 to 25."

  • Okay.

  • They're probably right out of high school and they're learning a career path.

  • Age-wise.

  • This is a little bit tricky, a little bit advanced.

  • That's why I wanted to include this but you'll definitely see this and I use this in daily

  • conversation all the time.

  • When you want to talk about a category or talk about two different categories like safety-wise.

  • Well, education-wise.

  • We can use this for so many different things.

  • You can talk about kids, "How's your life?"

  • "Well, health-wise, I'm doing pretty fine, but kid-wise I am overwhelmed."

  • You can use this for any category.

  • Vanessa: "Are you hungry?"

  • "Food-wise, I feel great, but drink-wise, yeah, let's go get a drink."

  • Okay.

  • You can use this for so many different categories.

  • I hope to introduce this to you so that you'll start to hear this as you listen to natural

  • English conversations.

  • Let's go to the next one.

  • Vanessa: For the sake of.

  • This expression has two different meanings.

  • So let me give you one sample sentence.

  • A lot of people make art for the sake of making art.

  • What do you think this means?

  • We could also say a lot of people make art for the sake of it, and that's just replacing

  • making art.

  • What do you think that means?

  • We're talking about the purpose.

  • What is their purpose for making art?

  • Well, if they're making art for the sake of making art, it's not for the sake of making

  • money, for the sake of creative enhancement.

  • It's just because they like making art.

  • It's not for a school project.

  • It's not a requirement.

  • It's just for the purpose of making art.

  • Vanessa: Or we could just say for the sake of it.

  • "Why are you learning English?"

  • "Well, I don't need it for my job.

  • I don't travel that much.

  • I don't know many people from other countries.

  • I'm learning English for the sake of it, just because I want to."

  • The purpose is, well, just the purpose of learning, for the sake of learning English.

  • But there's a second meaning for this expression.

  • Let's take a look at this sentence, for the sake of the people who haven't read the book,

  • I'll give a quick summary.

  • For the sake of the people who haven't read the book.

  • If you are discussing a book with some friends, but other people in the room haven't read,

  • it well you could use this expression, for the sake of the people who haven't read the

  • book.

  • I'll give a quick summary.

  • This is what happened in the story.

  • Vanessa: In this situation we're using for the sake of someone to talk about in respect

  • for someone.

  • So to respect the people who haven't read the book, so that they aren't completely lost

  • in our conversation.

  • Well, here's a quick summary.

  • So you could say, "For the sake of those who have sacrificed a lot, we are going to have

  • a special dinner or a special celebration in respect for those people."

  • All right, so we've got two different ways to use this.

  • The purpose of something, "I'm learning English for the sake of my job."

  • I'm learning English for the sake of it, just because I like learning.

  • Or for the sake of someone to respect someone.

  • Let's go to the next expression.

  • Vanessa: Let alone.

  • When we think about the word alone, we think about someone who's not with other people,

  • but erase that idea from your mind.

  • Let's look at this sample sentence and try to guess what you think it means.

  • I've never been to China, let alone seen the Great Wall.

  • The Great Wall of China is a big tourist attraction and a really cool historical feature in China,

  • but in my sentence I said I've never been to China, let alone seeing the Great Wall.

  • Yeah, I've seen pictures and videos, but it's not the same as in real life.

  • What's an expression that we can substitute in this situation?

  • Vanessa: You could say, "I've never been to China.

  • Not to mention seeing the Great Wall."

  • Oh, here we have a big category, been to China, and then I'm getting a little bit more specific

  • and saying, seeing the Great Wall.

  • You might also substitute much less.

  • I've never been to China, much less seen the Great Wall.

  • So we've got a big category and then we're narrowing it.

  • If I've never done that big category, of course I haven't done that small category too.

  • Let's look at another example.

  • After the accident, he couldn't walk, let alone play soccer.

  • What's the big category here?

  • Walking.

  • Well, if you can't walk, you probably have a difficult time playing soccer.

  • So we could say after the accident he couldn't walk much less play soccer.

  • After the accident he couldn't walk, not to mention play soccer.

  • Vanessa: Of course, if he can't walk, he can't play soccer.

  • I'm sure there are some exceptions, but in this situation we're going to use let alone.

  • He couldn't walk, let alone play soccer.

  • We're getting more specific.

  • This is a wonderful advanced expression that you're definitely going to hear all the time

  • around you.

  • Now that you're aware of this expression, you're going to hear it a lot.

  • All right, let's go to the next one.

  • Vanessa: A whole 'nother something.

  • A whole 'nother level.

  • A whole 'nother thing.

  • A whole 'nother animal.

  • There's a lot of different ways that we can use this, but the main part that's used in

  • each of these expressions is a whole 'nother.

  • What is 'nother?

  • Well, let's look at a sample sentence and I want you to guess.

  • We've been dating for two years, but deciding to get married is a whole 'nother animal.

  • Am I getting married to an animal?

  • No.

  • We're not really talking about animals in this situation.

  • We can just substitute thing or level.

  • Getting married is a whole 'nother level.

  • What if I said getting married is another level?

  • Does that make a little bit more sense to you?

  • We've been dating for two years, but getting married is another level.

  • I'm not sure if I'm ready to commit.

  • That's more serious.

  • Well, this is pretty much what we're saying here except this is using, if you want to

  • get a little nerdy and grammatical, this is using something called tmesis, which is when

  • you insert one word into another word.

  • Vanessa: So look at this expression.

  • Do you see another and then the word whole splitting it?

  • Yep.

  • That's what's happening.

  • Here we have another, but the word whole has just cut into the middle of that word.

  • Another whole or a whole 'nother.

  • When I was thinking about this expression, I had no idea why this actually happened,

  • because we use this all the time in daily life, but if you really try to break down,

  • wait, 'nother?

  • 'Nother is not a word.

  • Why do we say a whole 'nother?

  • I had to do a little bit of research about this, because it's so commonly used, but it's

  • not something that you would write in an essay.

  • It's not common grammar from a grammar textbook.

  • So I hope to introduce this to you so that you can hear it everywhere now and you can

  • use it yourself.

  • Let's take a look at another example.

  • Vanessa: Going to college is relatively easy, but finding a job in your field is a whole

  • 'nother thing.

  • Here we're talking about something that's a little bit more difficult.

  • It's a little bit more challenging, at least in the US, going to college, getting into

  • college.

  • It's a pretty simple process.

  • But it is much more difficult to find a job in the field that you studied.

  • If you studied History, well, it's going to be pretty difficult to find a career or find

  • a job in that field, in the field of History, so we could say finding a job in your field

  • is a whole 'nother thing.

  • All of these words that we can add afterwards, a whole 'nother animal, a whole 'nother

  • level, a whole 'nother thing.

  • They all have that same meaning, so you can really interchange them however you want.

  • A common way to use this grammatical form tmesis if you're curious, is often you'll

  • hear really casual situations where native speakers will say, "Abso-freaking-lutely."

  • Well, the expression is absolutely, and the word freaking, which is a polite way to say

  • a bad word, but we often split it.

  • Vanessa: If you eat some ice cream, that is unbelievable.

  • It is so good.

  • You could say, "Wow, this ice cream is abso-freaking-lutely amazing."

  • You're splitting the word absolutely with the word freaking.

  • You're probably going to hear this commonly in casual conversation, in this situation

  • because you're using the word freaking, it is really casual, but this idea of tmesis

  • is used a lot in English, especially with a whole 'nother something.