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  • Vanessa: Hi, I'm Vanessa from  speakenglishwithvanessa.com.  

  • Are you hungry? I hope so. Let's talk about it

  • Do you like to cook meals at home nonstopthen doing the dishes and then preparing  

  • what you're going to make for the next meal  all the time? Probably not. Sometimes it's  

  • nice to go to a restaurant, but nowadays  things have changed a bit. Here in the U.S.  

  • restaurants are slowly starting to  open, but not everyone feels comfortable  

  • going to a restaurant. For me, I have two young  children. So, even without the current situation,  

  • it's still a little bit complicated to go into  a restaurant. But we don't always want to cook.  

  • Sometimes it's nice to eat restaurant foodSo, what we can do is order food on the phone,  

  • pick up the food and take it home to eatOr sometimes we take it to a park to eat.  

  • And that is what I would like to do today  with you. I'd like to invite you to join me  

  • as I order food on the phone and pick it up. This is a very natural daily life situation.  

  • You are going to hear a fast conversation thathave on the phone with the woman who's working at  

  • the restaurant. But after each short clip from the  conversation, I'm going to be explaining to you  

  • the phrases we used, the different expressions, so  that you can use this as well, because sometimes  

  • talking on the phone is tough. You can't see the  other person, but also there's a lot of background  

  • noise. Sometimes the restaurant is loud. The  person on the phone is just speaking quickly.  

  • They're not thinking about your perspective. So, today I want to break down this conversation  

  • and help you to tackle this seemingly tough  situation. But after this conversation,  

  • I hope it will be more doable and approachableWe're going to be watching each of the clips  

  • from the conversation, one time, then I'm  going to explain it and then you'll watch  

  • it again after my explanation. I hope that the  second time will be more understandable to you.  

  • Your listening skills will have improved. Your  grammar and vocabulary will have improved.  

  • So, put your helmet on, put your seatbelt on. This  is going to be a fast ride, but you can do it.  

  • All right. Let's get started with my clip. We just got back from a hike and I'm so hungry,  

  • but we really don't have much food in our fridgeSo, we decided to order out and I thought I would  

  • invite you to join me in the process of ordering  food out at a restaurant to go pick up. So,  

  • let's see what happens. Waitress: Stoney Knob  

  • Cafe, this is Mackenzie, how can I help you? Vanessa: Hi, I'd like to make an order for pickup

  • This was a pretty fast start. Wasn't it? Well, in  this first clip, I introduced what I wanted to do  

  • very clearly and directly. I said, "I would  like to make an order for pickup." For pickup,  

  • means that I'm going to be the one getting the  food, but we could switch that out and say,  

  • "I would like to make a order for delivery."  And that means that, that restaurant  

  • will bring the food to your house. Now, this  is typically, in the U.S., only available for  

  • big restaurants, like chain restaurantsthe restaurant that I'm ordering from,  

  • there's only one of them near my house. It's  not an international, or even a national,  

  • or even a citywide restaurant. There's only one  of them. So, they don't have a delivery service

  • So, that's why I said, "for pickup" and I used  the verb "would". "I would like", very polite,  

  • "I would like to make an order for pickup." All  right, we're going to listen to that clip one more  

  • time. I hope that you'll be able to understandlittle bit more. I know it starts off with a bang,  

  • but I hope you'll be able to understand a little  bit more. We're going to listen to that first  

  • part of the clip. And then you're going to  watch the second part of the clip as well,  

  • that I'll explain in just a minute. Let's go. Waitress: Stoney Knob Cafe, this is Mackenzie,  

  • how can I help you? Vanessa: Hi. I'd like  

  • to make an order for pickup? Waitress: Yeah, that's all  

  • right. What can I get for you? Vanessa: Yes. I'd like to get  

  • the duck spring rolls. Waitress: All right

  • Vanessa: Also, a big Greek salad. Waitress: All right

  • Vanessa: You heard, "What can I get for  you?" She said, "What can I get for you?"  

  • This is a common restaurant expression when  you're ordering on the phone. She wants to  

  • know what are you going to order. This is  similar to the phrase. "How can I help you?"  

  • But usually we hear, "What can I get for you?"  At a restaurant, and "How can I help you?"  

  • In a retail store, where you're going to buy  clothes or buy a phone or something like this

  • Notice that in my answer, I used the word "the",  before my order, this is extremely common in a  

  • restaurant. I said, "the duck spring rolls.",  "I'd like to order the duck spring rolls." I'm  

  • talking about a specific item on the menu. Soyou might say, as you were looking at the menu,  

  • even in a fast food restaurant, you might  say, "Oh, I'd like to order the number five  

  • pork dumplings." Okay. You're talking about  that specific item, the number five. All right.  

  • Now we're going to listen to that clip one more  time. Listen for "What can I get for you?" And my  

  • answer, "the duck spring rolls." After we listen  to that clip, we're going to immediately listen to  

  • the next clip. So, get ready. Let's listen. Waitress: Yeah. That's all right.  

  • What can I get for you? Vanessa: Yes. I'd like to get  

  • the duck spring rolls. Waitress: All right

  • Vanessa: Also, a big Greek salad. Waitress: All right

  • Vanessa: Also, Enter the Dragon. Waitress: And how did you want that cooked

  • Vanessa: What do you recommend? Waitress: We recommend medium rare to rare

  • Vanessa: Okay. How about medium rare? Waitress: Alrighty

  • Vanessa: There is a lot happening in  this short clip, I ordered a tuna dish,  

  • and this dish just has a fancy name, "Enter the  Dragon", on their menu. She asked me an important  

  • question. She said, "How did you want that  cooked?" Notice that she uses the past tense. "How  

  • did you want that cooked?" And you can  use this equally the same amount as, "How  

  • do you want that cooked?" She could have asked  me either question and they both would have been  

  • equally fine. "How did you want that  cooked?", "How do you want that cooked?"  

  • Sometimes we use these kinds of flexible tenses  to be more polite in these restaurant situations.  

  • Unless you are working in a restaurant, maybe you  are, you don't need to worry about the tense. It's  

  • more important to understand the context and how  to answer, but you might hear people say this,  

  • "How did you want that cooked?"  Or "How do you want that cooked?" 

  • She's asking about how done or how cooked I want  my tuna. This is often asked for fish like tuna,  

  • salmon, and sometimes for hamburgers or  steak, which you'll see in just a minute.  

  • There are different levels of doneness. This is  what we call it, doneness. How much you would like  

  • it cooked. There is rare, which is basically rawvery red in the middle. Then we have medium rare,  

  • pretty red still. Then we have medium, a little  pink in the middle. Then we have medium well,  

  • just a small amount of pink. And then well done  or well, and this is no pink in the middle,  

  • this is completely cooked. Usually, this is  not recommended for these types of meats.  

  • So, what I like to do is what you just saw. I  like to ask the restaurant what they recommend

  • You're welcome to do this too. This is very  common in a restaurant. I want to know what the  

  • chef or what the restaurant thinks is the best  amount of doneness for the meat. I don't want it  

  • overcooked. I don't want it undercooked. I want  them to make the best decision here. Of course,  

  • if you have some special diet needs, then you  can say what you want and it's not going to  

  • offend the restaurant. If they say, "We recommend  medium." And you say, "Oh, no, no, no, I don't  

  • want any red. I want it to be well done." That's  fine. They'll do what you want. The customer is  

  • always right. But for me, I like to ask what they  recommend. You also heard me say this phrase,  

  • "How about medium rare?". "How about", why  did I say this? Usually, we use "how about"  

  • to give a polite suggestion to other people. For example, you might say to your friends,  

  • "How about we go to the beach this afternoon?"  And you're just giving a suggestion. You're  

  • not saying, "We have to go to the beach."  You're just giving a suggestion. Does it  

  • seem a little bit strange that the customer  would give a suggestion to the restaurant?  

  • Because they will do whatever I want. I'm the  customer. This is very normal. Why do I need to  

  • give a suggestion? Well, I'm just being politeThis is a common phrase that we use when we're in  

  • these type of restaurant or store situations. Let's imagine that you're trying on a shirt  

  • in a store and you like the shirt, but you don't  exactly like the color. So, the employee comes  

  • to you and says, "Can I get that for you in  a different color?" You might say, "Yeah.  

  • How about red?" You're suggesting, "I would like  to try this shirt, but in a different color",  

  • you might say, "Yeah. How about red?" Or you  could also say, "Do you have red? I'd like to try  

  • red." But we often use this lovely expression, how  about. "How about medium rare?", "How about red?"  

  • Great. All right. Let's watch that clip one  more time. I want you to listen carefully for  

  • how she asked me about how I want it cooked, howanswered, how I said, "how about", and then we're  

  • going to go on to the next clip where I'm also  going to continue my order. Listen carefully

  • Also, Enter the Dragon. Waitress:  

  • And how did you want that cooked? Vanessa: What do you recommend

  • Waitress: We recommend medium rare to rare. Vanessa: Okay. How about medium rare

  • Waitress: Alrighty. Vanessa: And finally,  

  • the Gustavo's Gourmet Hamburger Steak

  • Waitress: All right. WonderfulAnd how would you like that cooked

  • Vanessa: What do you think? You  think medium well is normal for that

  • Waitress: Most people go for medium on that one. Vanessa: Okay. Let's just do medium then

  • All right. In this clip, I finished ordering  all of the food that I was going to get  

  • because I... You'll see later, I have a gift  certificate. So, I decided to order a lot of  

  • food because I wouldn't really need to pay for itBut did you notice in this clip, if you did not,  

  • when we watch it again, please try to notice. I  said, "the", in front of my order, "the Gustavo's  

  • Hamburger Steak". The, because I'm talking  about a specific item on their menu.  

  • When I asked her about what is normal  for the doneness of the hamburger steak,  

  • she said, "Most people go for medium on that  one." Do you know this phrasal verb, "to go  

  • for"? "Most people go for medium on this one." It is extremely common to use this phrasal verb  

  • in restaurants. When you are ordering somethingyou might say, "All right, I'm going to go for the  

  • tuna and the steak.", "I'm going to go for the  salad.". "I'm going to go for", this just means to  

  • choose. "I'm going to choose that one." But we use  this phrasal verb a lot when we're ordering in a  

  • restaurant. All right, let's watch that clip again  and go on to the next clip. Listen carefully

  • And finally, the Gustavo's  Gourmet Hamburger Steak

  • Waitress: All right. WonderfulAnd how would you like that cooked

  • Vanessa: What do you think? You  think medium well is normal for that

  • Waitress: Most people go for medium on that one. Vanessa: Okay. Let's just do medium then

  • Waitress: Alrighty. And anything else for you? Vanessa: That's all

  • Waitress: All right. So, that's the duck spring  rolls. The Greek salad. The tuna, cooked medium  

  • rare. Then the Gustavo, cooked medium? Vanessa: Yes. That's it

  • Here, she is repeating my order to make sure that  I got everything correct. I think this is a common  

  • practice around the world in restaurants. It seems  like a good idea, right? But I used two phrases  

  • with the word "that", they're slightly differentSo, I want to help you understand them and also  

  • use them because we use them all the timelike a lot of expressions from this video. So,  

  • when she asks, "Anything else for you?" She's  wanting to know, are you going to order anything  

  • else? "Anything else for you?" And I said,  "That's all." That's all, means I'm finished.  

  • There is no more. This is the end. That's allIt's not rude to say, it is extremely helpful,  

  • in fact, to say, "Anything else I can get  for you.", "Nope. That's all. Thank you."  

  • After she listed all of the things thatordered, I said, "That's it." That's it

  • "Yes. That's it." How is this different from  "That's all."? Well here, I'm telling her,  

  • "You got it, correct. That's it." This is common  in other situations too, not just restaurants.  

  • This is very useful for you, as an English  learner. If you're having a conversation and  

  • you forget a word, which happens to us  all, even for native English speakers,  

  • this happens too, you might be talking  about an experience you had driving.  

  • "I was driving down the street, and then a dog ran  into the road and I didn't want to hit the dog.  

  • So, I turned my car and I ran into a... What's  that word? The thing on the side of the road,  

  • it goes down. Rain is in it sometimes." And your  friend might say, "A ditch, you ran into a ditch." 

  • And here you can use our key expression. You can  say, "That's it. Yes. I ran into a ditch." You're  

  • letting that person know, with enthusiasm, that  they got it correct. That was the word that you  

  • were thinking of. So, here I used "that's it" to  tell her, "You got my order, correct. Yep. That's  

  • it." Or you can tell your friend, "That's it. You  understood the word that I was trying to say."  

  • All right, let's go back and watch this  clip and then go on to the next clip

  • Waitress: Alrighty. And anything else for you? Vanessa: That's all

  • Waitress: All right. So, that's the duck spring  rolls. The Greek salad. The tuna, cooked medium  

  • rare. Then the Gustavo, cooked medium? Vanessa: Yes, that's it

  • Waitress: All right. PerfectWe'll have this ready for pickup  

  • in probably about 15 minutes. Is that okay? Vanessa: Yes. I have a quick question though,  

  • I was given a gift certificate  to Stoney Knob. When I pay,  

  • should I just bring that  with me or what should I do

  • Because I don't order pickup very often. I wasn't  sure what this restaurant wanted to do. I didn't  

  • know if they wanted me to pay over the phonesometimes they'll ask for your card number over  

  • the phone, or if they wanted me to just pay when  I went to the restaurant. So, that's why I asked,  

  • and because I had a gift certificate, I wasn't  sure what their process was. So, I simply asked  

  • them, "What should I do?" And this is good  news for you because maybe there's multiple  

  • cultural practices that you're not sure  about. It is no problem to ask. I asked,  

  • you saw me ask, I didn't know what to do. This  is my home country. I feel familiar with a lot  

  • of the customs, but there's still things  that I don't know too. And I want to make  

  • sure that I'm being polite to that restaurant. So, I just asked, "What should I do?" And I  

  • also... Because it's a gift certificate, I wanted  them to be aware of this, in case there were any  

  • little rules about the gift certificate, sometimes  gift certificates or gift cards have rules like,  

  • you need to go into the store to pay, or you  need to spend this much money to use it. So,  

  • I just wanted them to be aware so that there  were no surprises when I went to pick up my food.  

  • All right. Let's watch this clip  and then go on to our next one

  • Waitress: All right. Perfect. We'll have  this ready for pickup in probably about  

  • 15 minutes. Is that okay? Vanessa: Yes. I have a quick question though,  

  • I was given a gift certificate to  Stoney Knob. When I pay, should I  

  • just bring that with me or what should I do? Waitress: Yeah. Just bring it with you and we'll  

  • be able to... We can just take it from you. You  can either come in to pay with it, or we can just  

  • take it from you in the car and do it inside. Vanessa: Okay

  • Waitress: So, either way, yeahBut just bring it with you

  • Vanessa: In this clip, she's giving me two  options. One option is, I can go into the  

  • restaurant and pay for the food when I arrive, or  they will come to my car, take my payment, go in,  

  • make the payment and bring it back to me. There  are two options. She uses a lovely expression  

  • here. She says, "either way", you can use this  in so many situations in daily life. If you and  

  • your friend are going to drive to the beach, and  you're not sure whose car you're going to take,  

  • you might say, "Well, should you drive, or should  I?" And your friend might say, "I don't know,  

  • either way is fine with me." Or if your friend  says, "Well, do you want to cook tonight,  

  • or do you want to go to a restaurant?" You  might say, "Oh, either way is fine with me."  

  • Either way. Both of these are okay with youeither way. All right, let's go and watch  

  • this clip again and then go on to our next one. Waitress: Yeah. Just bring it with you and we'll  

  • be able to... We can just take it from you. You  can either come in to pay with it, or we can just  

  • take it from you in the car and do it inside. Vanessa: Okay

  • Waitress: So, either way, yeahBut just bring it with you

  • Vanessa: Okay. I should just  give you a call when I get there

  • Waitress: Yes, ma'am. That would be great. Vanessa: I live in the South of the U.S. and it is  

  • quite common to use the term "ma'am", even though  I'm probably not that much older than she is. I'm  

  • not her mother or her grandmother, but it's still  polite in the South to say "ma'am". So, if someone  

  • asks me a question, I might say, "Oh, yes, ma'amthat's right." If I'm talking on the phone to my  

  • bank, or even if I go into a restaurant, I might  say that or into the bank, this is polite, but it  

  • is not necessary. If you say this in the North  or in the West or in the Midwest of the U.S.,  

  • I don't think this is as commonbut in the South of the U.S.,  

  • when you say "ma'am", this is only for women, just  to let you know, when you say "ma'am", to a woman,  

  • or "yes, sir", to a man, their eyes get all  sparkly and lit up because you're being so polite

  • And in Southern culture, where I live, this  is kind of what children are taught. They're  

  • taught that when you say "Yes, ma'am. Yessir." You're being polite to older people,  

  • but even in restaurant situationswhen there's not a big age difference,  

  • this is still a polite situation with a store  and a customer. So, you're going to hear those  

  • expressions if you visit the South of the U.S.  Please don't feel like you need to use, ma'am,  

  • when you're talking with people on a daily basisbut I just wanted you to know why she said "ma'am"