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  • Hello this is The English We Speak

  • with me Feifei and joining me is Rob.

  • Hello Rob.

  • Hello. Now, I was thinking.

  • You always start the programme.

  • It's never me.

  • That's right, I have always started the programme.

  • That's the way I like it.

  • Really? And you always introduce the examples.

  • I do Rob, it's just the way I like to do it

  • and I know what's best.

  • Hmm, you do you.

  • I do me?

  • No. You do you. It means you do your own thing.

  • You know your own mind and

  • you probably won't change.

  • You do you?

  • Hmm, yes thanks for clearing that up Rob.

  • I guess you're right.

  • Thanks but can I introduce the examples today please?

  • No.

  • Look, we can agree on this.

  • You do you and we'll talk about this again later.

  • I told my girlfriend to do more exercise

  • but she wouldn't listen so I told her:

  • "You do you, I'm off for a run".

  • I like the way you do you.

  • You stick to what you think is right and are

  • not influenced by what other people's comments.

  • This is The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English and

  • we're talking about the expression 'you do you',

  • which can be said to someone to mean they

  • always behave in the same way and they won't change.

  • Of course Rob, I couldn't do things your way.

  • Oh, why?

  • You're always late so it's best if I start the programme.

  • And there's another reason why I always do me.

  • I'm always right.

  • Oh, in that case maybe I can do you too?

  • It's ok Rob, it's best if you do you and I'll do me.

  • Who me? This is very confusing.

  • I'll tell you what you can do.

  • You can finish the programme because I've got to go. Bye!

  • Right, that's all for this The English We Speak. Bye.

  • Feifei, where have you gone?

  • Welcome to The English We Speak.

  • I'm Neil.

  • And I'm Feifei.

  • You're a pretty polite person, aren't you, Feifei?

  • Well, thanks. I don't know. I try to be!

  • That was a very polite answer!

  • But sometimes we want to say things that are

  • very honest, or that others  might not want to hear.

  • For example, I ask you: "Do I look tired today?"

  • Well, I could directly say:

  • "Yes, you do look a bit tired."

  • Or you could start with this

  • slang expression 'not gonna lie'.

  • Not gonna lie Feifei, you do look a little tired.

  • I know, I need to get to bed earlier!

  • 'Gonna' of course, is short for 'going to'.

  • Using this phrase indicates that you're

  • choosing to be honest rather than polite.

  • It's not only used for honest criticism,

  • we might also use it before something

  • we're very proud of,

  • or something we boast about.

  • For example: I love recording these programmes.

  • Though I'm not gonna lie, I'm the

  • best presenter in this team.

  • Woah, that's enough. I'm sure everyone

  • listening agrees that I'm the best presenter.

  • Of course you're a fantastic presenter, Feifei.

  • Just an example!

  • Talking of examples, let's hear a few more.

  • Fancy coming round for dinner tomorrow?

  • Absolutely. If you're making your famous roast?

  • Oh yes. Not gonna lie, it's  the best roast in town!

  • Slow down! You really are a terrible

  • driver Mark, not gonna lie.

  • Not gonna lie, I absolutely love my job.

  • I feel so happy when I walk through

  • the office door every day.

  • That last example sounds just like me.

  • Especially as I'm (coughs) the best presenter.

  • OK, OK, that joke is getting old now.

  • You're right. OK, one more thing.

  • This phrase 'not gonna lie'...

  • Yes?

  • Not gonna lie, I think some people use it too much!

  • Yes, it's become a popular phrase on social media.

  • Usually accompanied by a photo of someone

  • on holiday at the beach with a post saying:

  • "Not gonna lie, it's stunning here!"

  • The kind of post that makes me feel

  • jealous when I'm stuck in the office.

  • But I thought you loved your job?!

  • Oh, I do.

  • And yes, you are a very good presenter, Neil.

  • That makes me feel much better, not gonna lie.

  • Bye. Bye.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei.

  • And me, Roy.

  • We may sound a little different.

  • That's because we are not able to record in our

  • normal studios during the coronavirus outbreak.

  • In this programme, we have a phrase that

  • means to keep talking about something,

  • usually in a boring or annoying way.

  • You kept talking about some band this morning.

  • What were you banging on about?

  • What do you mean 'banging on'?

  • I wasn't hitting anything this morning with a pan!

  • I was just talking about music with Neil.

  • Exactly! You were talking about it so much,

  • and I was trying to work.

  • 'Banging on about something' isn't literal,

  • and why would you mention a pan?!

  • It means you were talking about something

  • to a level that it became annoying.

  • Ahhh, the way in which you kept talking about

  • that film 'Unicorns Eat Bananas in the Stars'!

  • You banged on about it so much last

  • week that people left the room.

  • That film is amazing.

  • Feifei, you kept giving people spoilers, and

  • nobody went to see the film in the end because

  • you kept banging on about

  • everything that happened.

  • Well, that's your opinion, Roy.

  • Anyway, let's listen to these examples.

  • My friend keeps banging on about where he's

  • going to go when he buys his new car.

  • It's really frustrating.

  • That person on the bus was really annoying.

  • She kept banging on about

  • how the prices had gone up.

  • Will you please stop banging on about my project!?

  • If you think you could do a better job,

  • you can do my work for me.

  • This is The English We Speak from BBC Learning

  • English and we're talking about the expression

  • 'bang on about something', which is used

  • to say that someone is talking about something

  • so much that it is annoying or irritating.

  • Sorry, Feifei. I didn't mean to say you

  • were banging on about that film.

  • Everyone did love your enthusiasm about it.

  • I'm sorry too, Roy. I just wanted to know

  • more about the band you were talking about,

  • so I found it annoying that I didn't understand.

  • Ah, well, next I'll tell you more about it.

  • That's OK. I think I've heard enough about

  • your taste in music for one lifetime,

  • but thanks anyway. Bye, Roy.

  • Bye.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei.

  • And me, Roy.

  • In this programme, we have an expression

  • which describes when someone has read the

  • message you've sent them, but hasn't replied.

  • That reminds me, Roy, did you get my

  • message yesterday?

  • Ohyes, I did. I read it and then

  • totally forgot to answer you.

  • Was it something important?

  • I can't believe it! You completely ignored

  • my message. I got left on read!

  • What's the colour 'red' got to do with

  • the fact I forgot to reply?

  • Red is actually my favourite colour.

  • Not red the colour, but 'readas in the past of 'read'.

  • Ahh, got you.