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  • Google is accused of treason.

  • Protests erupt in a Hong Kong mall.

  • And US companies are leaving China

  • That and more on this week's China news headlines.

  • This is China Uncensored.

  • I'm Chris Chappell.

  • This week's China news headlines.

  • Peter Thiel, PayPal co-founder and billionaire tech investor,

  • has questioned Google's “seemingly treasonous decision

  • of working with China on artificial intelligence.

  • Thiel made those comments at the National Conservatism Conference.

  • He also went on Fox News.

  • The weird fact, that's indisputable,

  • is that Google is working with Communist China,

  • but not the US military on its breakthrough AI technology.”

  • But why is that?”

  • Well that's the question.”

  • Now Google has denied working with China's military.

  • However, their work in China is still benefiting China's military.

  • For example, scientists from Google,

  • along with other US tech giants,

  • have been working with Chinese universities,

  • researching and developing what's calleddual usetechnology.

  • That's technology that has both civilian and military use.

  • Like these touch screens that can also be used for jet fighters.

  • Another example of dual use technology?

  • Artificial intelligence.

  • So I agree:

  • This is a serious problem.

  • And even President Trump said his administration willtake a look.”

  • Now Peter Thiel is not a disinterested third party.

  • He's a founding board member of Facebook,

  • which just happens to be one of Google's main competitors.

  • But just because he'd be happy to see Google go down,

  • doesn't mean he's wrong about what Google's doing in China.

  • Let's just also keep an eye on what Facebook

  • and other US tech companies are doing in China.

  • But Google may be trying to win some good karma.

  • Or at least one Google security employee is.

  • Google has warned Hong Kong protest champion Joshua Wong

  • that he needs to watch out for government backed hackers.

  • Wong posted the warning on his Twitter account.

  • Now Google didn't say which government to watch out for.

  • I'll give you one guess.

  • Hong Kong has been engulfed in protests over the past month.

  • People there are afraid the Chinese Communist Party

  • is trying to destroy their freedoms.

  • But there's one serious flaw with these protests.

  • It's really hot and humid in Hong Kong.

  • Which is why after we ate dinner at New Town Plaza,

  • a mall in Sha Tin a few weeks ago,

  • Shelley had the brilliant idea they should start holding protests inside,

  • because of the delightful air conditioning.

  • Well, someone must have been paying attention.

  • This is from July 14.

  • In that very same mall.

  • Ok, so the protesters didn't want to go to the mall.

  • Or at least that's what they told their parents.

  • Earlier in the day, there was a protest march to Sha Tin,

  • a very residential area of Hong Kong.

  • And then riot police showed up and chased the protesters into this high-end mall.

  • Probably because they wanted everyone to enjoy

  • the cool, refreshing air conditioning inside.

  • Definitely nothing bad is about to happen...

  • Organizers say there were more than 100,000 people at the protest on Sunday.

  • Police say there were only 28,000.

  • I don't know what's accurate, but either way,

  • that's a lot of people to fit in that shopping mall.

  • Which turned into a pitched battle between police and protesters,

  • after police trapped protesters in the mall and wouldn't let them leave.

  • Umbrellas were flying.

  • So was pepper spray.

  • The amazing part is, there was no looting.

  • And can I just say how rare it is for a protest inside a mall

  • not to involve looting?

  • Police say they arrested 37 protesters and 11 policemen were injured.

  • In this footage from Hong Kong Free Press,

  • you can see what appears to be a journalist intervening in protesters

  • beating up a plain clothes policeman.

  • And then dozens more journalists mob the guy for pictures.

  • The Hong Kong government has of course condemned the violence.

  • But the important thing to remember is,

  • at least there was air conditioning.

  • One of the protesters' demands is for Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam

  • to step down.

  • Well, according to the Financial Times, she tried.

  • Several times.

  • ButBeijing has refused to let her stand down.”

  • The Financial Times says it's because Beijing considers

  • the situation in Hong Kong to be her fault,

  • and that no one else would want to step into her shoes.

  • Yes, that does make sense.

  • But I think the real reason is that the Chinese Communist Party

  • doesn't want to set a precedent that protesting can get a leader to step down.

  • Not that anyone would ask that of Xi Jinping.

  • Everyone loves him.

  • It's required.

  • And just days after the mall protest,

  • thousands of older Hongkongers marched through the streets

  • in what was called a “silver hairedprotest against the extradition bill.

  • Just look at these rioters.

  • Judging by the protests over the past month,

  • so far the Hong Kong government has alienated young people,

  • old people, lawyers, mothers, and even mall shoppers.

  • Is there anyone left?

  • Remember former National Security Adviser Susan Rice?

  • Well, she's condemning a Chinese diplomat as a “racist disgracefor his tweets.

  • The tweets, which have since been deleted, had to do with Xinjiang.

  • Last week, 22 countries signed a letter condemning

  • the Chinese Communist Party's persecution of the Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang.

  • But then, “Ambassadors representing 37 countries praised China

  • for its 'remarkable achievements in the field of human rights.'”

  • Among those 37 countries were stellar human rights upholders

  • like Saudi Arabia, Russia, and Syria.

  • Countries where they have a right to violate your humanity.

  • Anyway, the Chinese diplomat Lijian Zhao

  • went on Twitter to call that letter of support for China

  • a “big slap on the face of the US and its western cohorts.”

  • And in a classic tactic of changing the conversation,

  • Zhao went on to talk about how in Washington DC,

  • you knowthe whitedon't go to certain areas

  • because of theblack and Latin”.

  • Now you might be thinking that's racist.

  • But I'm just wondering why a top Chinese diplomat

  • would have a Twitter account.

  • Doesn't he know Twitter is banned in China?

  • Bad news if your dream job is working at Huawei:

  • You have terrible judgment.

  • Also, Huawei is planning extensive layoffs in the US.

  • It is kind of hard to operate in a country

  • where you company has effectively been banned.

  • The Trump administration banned Huawei over national security concerns.

  • It's now considering maybe lifting part of the ban,

  • in certain cases,

  • where there's no security threat.

  • But it's still basically a ban.

  • American and European companies are fleeing China.

  • According to a survey,

  • 80% of American companies in China are planning to leave,

  • while 67% of European Union companies are.

  • And the Chinese economy is taking a hit.

  • According to Business Insider,

  • China's growth is at a 27-year low.

  • But the Chinese regime knows how to tackle its problems head on.

  • By detaining another Canadian citizen,

  • plus 12 Taiwanese citizens.

  • The China-Canada relationship has been a bit frosty

  • since Canada detained Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou last December.

  • She's accused of violating US sanctions on Iran.

  • According to Globe and Mail,

  • China has detained at least 13 Canadians since then.

  • As for the Taiwanese citizens, well,

  • the Chinese Communist Party considers Taiwan a part of China,

  • so maybe in their view,

  • they're just detaining Chinese citizens.

  • Which to be fair, the Communist Party is very good at.

  • Speaking of Taiwan being considered a part of China,

  • Kaohsiung mayor Han Kuo-yu will be running in the 2020

  • Taiwanese presidential election against current president Tsai Ing-wen.

  • Han supports closer ties with Beijing.

  • According to the New York Times,

  • Han has promoted the view that Taiwan

  • and China belong to the same country,

  • and had argued that closer ties with China would lift Taiwan's economy.”

  • And he also travelled to China earlier this year,

  • where he met with top Communist Party officials

  • in the former British colony of Hong Kong.”

  • Beijing has always promoted the one country two systems model

  • they have in Hong Kong as a way of potentially governing Taiwan under Chinese rule.

  • And you can see how well it's working in Hong Kong.

  • Meanwhile, President Tsai Ing-Wen was in New York last week.

  • And outside her hotel, a group of pro Beijing protesters,

  • waving the American and Chinese flags,

  • started attacking a group of Taiwanese supporters.

  • They jumping him!

  • That kind of behavior should be flagged.

  • So, keep your eye on the upcoming election in Taiwan.

  • It's going to be interesting.

  • And now it's time for me to answer a question from one of you

  • a fan who support China Uncensored with a dollar or more per episode,

  • by contributing through Patreon.

  • CaptDantastic asks,

  • Wasn't the extradition law Hong Kong was trying to pass

  • comparable to Canada's agreement with the US concerning the Huawei exec?

  • Basically bringing a person to justice to another country

  • where the law in the delivering country wasn't broken?

  • How come no one has spoken of the obvious hypocrisy of this?

  • Good question.

  • So there's actually a pretty big difference

  • between the extradition agreements most countries have,

  • and the extradition bill that was being attempted in Hong Kong.

  • Extradition agreements are usually between two countries

  • that have similar legal systems.

  • That way, a suspect can get a fair trial after being extradited.

  • Or, I suppose, if both countries have really bad legal systems,

  • the suspect can get a totally unfair trial.

  • In the case of Hong Kong versus China,

  • Hong Kong has a British-style legal system that protects the rights of the accused.

  • Mainland China does not.

  • Its courts have a 99.9% conviction rate,

  • which means that wrongly accused people

  • almost never get a successful defense.

  • Hong Kongers don't want to be subject to that system.

  • And it's not just dissidents in Hong Kong that are nervous.

  • Many businesspeople are freaked out,

  • since operating in China typically requires bribes.

  • So a lot of influential people in Hong Kong

  • could be at risk of being sent to a Chinese court

  • if the extradition bill gets passed.

  • And the Communist Party uses the law as a tool

  • to go after people for political reasons.

  • So the Hong Kong extradition bill

  • was not like the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou,

  • where she'll have access to a fair legal system

  • after being extradited from Canada to the US.

  • Because at the end of the day,

  • even Meng would much rather be in a Canadian or American court

  • than in a Chinese court.

  • Thanks for your question.

  • And thanks to everyone watching!

  • We could not make this show without your support.

  • Whether it's supporting us through Patreon

  • or just watching and sharing the show with your friends and family.

  • So thank you from me and everyone on the China Uncensored team.

  • Once again I'm Chris Chappell,

  • see you next time.

Google is accused of treason.

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Google Accused of “Treason” Over China Ops

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    zijun su posted on 2021/07/22
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