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  • Please, thank you.

  • These are words you learn when you're first learning English, but wouldn't it be better to use alternatives of these words, which help you sound more natural, more interesting and more cool?

  • Well, in this video, we're going to look at 20 different expressions in British English that you can use instead of saying thank you.

  • If you like this video, please give the video a thumbs up and click subscribe, and I would be eternally grateful.

  • 'I would be eternally grateful.'

  • There you go, what a wonderful expression, instead of just saying thank you.

  • This is quite extreme, um, which means obviously I would thank you, I would be grateful for the rest of my life.

  • A bit much? Maybe.

  • Okay, so let's go with a couple of really, really common ones.

  • The most common way of saying thank you in British English is 'cheers'.

  • 'Hey, hey cheers.'

  • A lot of people know this word because it's what you say when you have a glass of wine or a beer, and you say to the other person, 'cheers', right?

  • But also, it's a very, very common way of saying thank you in English.

  • Probably the most common way is simply, 'thanks'.

  • It's a short version of thank you.

  • Where I'm from in the north of England, we have an even shorter version of this, and it is 'ta'!

  • 'Ta!' 'Ta very much!'

  • Thanks very much. It's nice, it's colloquial, it's northern; you probably won't hear it in the south of England.

  • You definitely won't hear it in the States, but I love it.

  • 'Ta!' 'Ta very much!'

  • Okay, now let's take the word thanks, and now we can add some words after this to make a few different expressions.

  • 'Thanks' just means thank you.

  • If we want to make this stronger, we can say, 'thanks a lot.'

  • We can also say, 'thanks a bunch.'

  • 'Thanks a bunch.'

  • And if we want to make it even stronger, we can say 'thanks a million.'

  • 'Thanks a million.'

  • One that I hear students using quite often is 'thank you so much'.

  • It's fine.

  • We do use that, but I think students often use it more than they should because 'thank you so much' is very, very extreme.

  • It's like thank you so much.

  • But you know, I've heard students say this when I give them a pencil.

  • 'Greg, can I have a pencil?'

  • 'There you go.'

  • 'Thank you so much.'

  • Definitely too much.

  • And another one is 'thanks ever so much'.

  • 'Thanks ever so much.'

  • I really like this expression.

  • You can use it for everything - It's not just for extreme things.

  • That's a really nice expression to use.

  • 'Thanks ever so much.'

  • Okay, let's use the word 'appreciate'.

  • Now, we've got a couple of expressions.

  • One is 'much appreciated'. 'Much appreciated.'

  • And another one is 'I really appreciate it'.

  • You know, thanks for the cookies you brought to my house yesterday.

  • 'I-I really appreciate it.'

  • At the beginning of this video, I used the word 'grateful'.

  • I said I would be eternally grateful if you subscribe to my channel and give this video a thumbs up.

  • 'Grateful.'

  • So, 'I would be eternally grateful' is, yeah, it's a big deal.

  • If you want to be more normal and just use the word grateful, you could say 'I'm really grateful' or 'I'm so grateful'.

  • If you want to specify why you are grateful, use the preposition 'for' plus 'a noun'.

  • 'I'm so grateful for your help.'

  • 'I'm so grateful for your time.'

  • The next one is a very common expression we use when somebody gives us a present.

  • You receive a present and you say, 'you shouldn't have.'

  • 'You shouldn't have.'

  • Like, literally, you shouldn't have taken the time and effort to buy me a present.

  • 'You shouldn't have.'

  • And, obviously, we are not saying, 'Hey, don't buy me a present next year.'

  • It's just an expression, which means you've been really nice here.

  • I didn't expect it from you, so you shouldn't have.

  • Okay, a couple with the word 'kind'.

  • 'I' 'I' 'I'. Kind not 'kind'. 'Kind.'

  • One is 'that's so kind'.

  • 'That's so kind.'

  • Or we could also say, 'you're too kind.'

  • 'Oh, thank you. You're too kind.'

  • 'You're too kind.'

  • Now, saying you are ... is also a very common way of saying thank you.

  • We've got 'you are too kind'.

  • We could also say, 'you're a star.'

  • 'You're a star.'

  • Like, you are excellent, you're so helpful, you're so kind, you're a star.

  • And another one is 'you're a legend'.

  • 'Oh, thanks, mate. You are a legend.'

  • We can also say, 'you're the best.'

  • 'You're the best.'

  • And if the thing that the person does that you want to say thank you for, if that really saves you from, like a bad situation; let's imagine you have lost your key and you can't get in your house, so a friend drives across the city to give you an extra key.

  • Oh, 'he saves your life'.

  • 'He saves your life.'

  • Not literally, but, come on, he saves you.

  • So you could say, 'you're a lifesaver.'

  • 'You're a lifesaver.'

  • Right, we also have: 'I can't thank you enough.' Thank you.

  • 'I can't thank you enough.'

  • Like, I want to thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you, but there is no limit to my gratitude.

  • I can't thank you enough.

  • And the next one is 'if you do me a favour'.

  • 'If you do me a favour', I could say, 'I owe you one.'

  • 'I owe you one.'

  • 'I owe you one.'

  • And this literally means 'I owe you a favour'.

  • So, next time, it's my turn to do you a favour.

  • All right, the most common mistake I hear is when people are speaking to me and they say 'many thanks'.

  • 'Many thanks' is not really an expression we use in spoken English.

  • We do, however, use it in written English, and it's a very common way of ending an email.

  • 'Many thanks, Greg.'

  • So save 'many thanks' for your written English.

  • So, they are your twenty British expressions to say thank you.

  • Use them, they will help you sound more native.

  • And if you have liked this video, please use one of the expressions to thank me for it in the comments below.

  • There are another couple of videos there with more ways of using different expressions and avoiding very common words, which will help you sound more native, more natural.

  • So, I recommend you watch one of those videos next, and I'll see you there.

  • Thanks for watching, and bye for now

Please, thank you.

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A2 UK grateful eternally ta common expression favour

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    Elise Chuang posted on 2021/07/16
Video vocabulary