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  • Do you ever hear of something that seems too good to be true turns out to be true? Like there

  • is a sugar substitute that tastes like sugar, behaves like sugar when used in baking, and

  • chemically speaking it is sugar but have virtually no calories and also does not raise blood

  • sugar level? How can that be possible? Let's find out, with people also ask.

  • Hi, I am Shao Chieh Lo, Welcome to what people also ask, where I search something seemingly obvious

  • and share with you some of its PAA, aka People Also Ask, which is a feature telling you what

  • other people are searching on Google that relates to your query. Today's keyword is Allulose.

  • We will talk about what is it, and some current researches about it. Usually,

  • I will use the article that Google algorithmically extracted to answer our PAA, but I believe

  • this episode's keyword is related to YMYL contents aka contents that would potentially

  • affect your decision on their health or money. So in this episode, I will also make

  • sure that all medical information mentioned has peer review researches to back it up too.

  • That being said, you should still consult your doctor before you make any change in

  • your diet, I am just a random person on the internet who knows how to Google. So let's

  • start with our first PAA: Is Allulose good for you? Google's auto-generated answer is

  • linked to an article titled "Is Allulose a Healthy Sweetener?" written by Franziska Spritzler

  • who is a registered dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator. This article

  • is published by Healthline, which is an American website providing health information headquartered

  • in San Francisco, CA. This website's articles are usually written by medical professionals

  • and are usually backed by peer-reviewed researches. They do, however, face some controversy concerning

  • the neutrality of some of their pieces in 2018 and 2019, I will include relevant articles

  • in the further reading. That being said, their articles are usually well-curated and informative

  • and can be a good starting point for information gathering before you talk to your doctor.

  • Just make sure you actually talk to your doctor before making any medical decision after reading their article

  • This article compiled a lot of peer-reviewed studies regarding

  • allulose from 2009 to 2015. And here are some summaries of this article: 1.Allulose is a

  • rare sugar with the same chemical formula as fructose. 2.It delivers few calories because

  • the majority of the allulose you consume will not be metabolized and will be eliminated

  • in the urine without being used as fuel according to research published in 2010 on Journal Metabolism.

  • 3.Allulose has been shown in animal and human trials to lower blood sugar levels, improve

  • insulin sensitivity, and protect insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. 4. Allulose may promote

  • fat burningreduce the risk of fatty liver disease and help prevent obesity.

  • There is an especially interesting study in 2012  published in the Journal of food science.

  • In this study, obese rats were fed a high-fat diet with supplements of either allulose,

  • sucrose, or erythritol for eight weeks. Like allulose, erythritol provides virtually no

  • calories and does not raise blood sugar or insulin levels. Nevertheless, the rats given

  • allulose gained less belly fat than the rats fed erythritol or sucrose. This suggests allulose

  • might not only be a sugar substitute, it might actually help to prevent fat accumulation.

  • However, since most of those studies are based on animal models or small-scale human trials,

  • more high-quality human research is still needed. So here's the question: What is the catch?

  • It's just too good to be true, a real sugar, taste like sugar but with virtually

  • no calories, and at the same time might promote fat burning? Are you kidding me, it must have

  • some terrible hidden side effects, isn't it? right? Let's talk about our next PAA: How safe is Allulose?

  • Google's auto-generated answer is linked to an article titled "Is allulose a

  • healthful alternative to sugar?" published by MedicalNewsToday, which is a website actually

  • has been acquired by Healthline Media since 2016. According to this article, the FDA has

  • approved Allulose for use in humans and classified them as GRAS, aka generally recognized as

  • safeAnd based on current studies we actually haven't found any serious side effects yet

  • other than some abdominal discomfort when consuming large quantities, and even this

  • side effect is not toxic and usually temporary. However,  more high-quality research to

  • confirm the long-term safety of allulose is still needed. I don't know...Maybe one day we will discover

  • allulose' skeletons in the closet, but currently there is no evidence that allulose will cause

  • serious side effects when consuming moderately. So next question: Does Allulose bake like

  • sugar? Google's auto-generated answer is linked to an article comparing the differences between

  • erythritol and allulose in the baking process published by Sweet Logic, which is a US company

  • that specializes in low-carb bakery products. According to this article, erythritol is easy

  • to crystallize, and it does not caramelize the way real sugar does. And because erythritol

  • is a sugar alcohol, there will be a strange cooling sensation when you eat it. Allulose

  • does not have the above problem at all. But note that the sweetness of Allulose is only

  • 70% of that of sucrose, so to achieve the same sweetness, more Allulose needs to be

  • added, and it may also increase the volume of the finished product. I searched for some

  • food science researches on the use of allulose as baking sugar and found some interesting studies.

  • A study published in the Journal of Food Processing and Preservation in 2020,

  • baked 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% allulose pound cakes, and a 100% sucrose pound cake as control group

  • , and found that as the proportion of allulose increases, the crumb of pound cake

  • caramelizes faster, but there is no significant difference in the texture of these five-pound cakes.

  • Another study published in the journalLWTin 2021 compared cupcakes made with

  • allulose and sucrose got similar results. Interestingly, this study also found that

  • allulose cakes lost water slower in the baking process than sucrose cakes, and it usually

  • takes a longer time to bake to achieve the same texture. But at the same time, allulose

  • cake is also easier to burn because it caramelizes faster. So for the bakers, managing the baking

  • temperature and time will be a challenge when using allulose as sugar, but if it is handled

  • well, the taste and texture of the finished product can be very similar to ordinary cakes.

  • Okay, let's recap. Today we learned that Allulose is a rare sugar with the same chemical formula

  • as fructose but it delivers few calories because the majority of the allulose you consume will

  • not be metabolized. Allulose might potentially help lowering blood sugar levels, improving

  • insulin sensitivity, and promoting fat burning. It's classified as generally recognized as safe

  • by FDA and we actually haven't found any serious side effects yet other than some abdominal discomfort.

  • However,  more high-quality research to confirm the long-term safety of

  • allulose is still needed. Allulose behaves very similarly to regular sugar when used

  • in baking. However, it tends to caramelize faster and is more likely to burn. If you

  • made it to the end of the video, chances are that you enjoy learning what people also ask

  • on Google. But let's face it, reading PAA yourself will be a pain. So here's the deal,

  • I will do the reading for you and upload a video compiling some fun PAAs once a week,

  • all you have to do is to hit the subscribe button and the bell icon so you won't miss

  • any PAA report that I compile. So just do it right now. Bye!

Do you ever hear of something that seems too good to be true turns out to be true? Like there

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B1 US article paa baking published fat blood sugar

Allulose: Real sugar, baked like sugar, but with virtually no calories? What is that catch?

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    羅紹桀 posted on 2021/07/15
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