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  • We are going to focus on two consonant sounds.

  • The sound /ʤ/ and the sound /z/.

  • Okay.

  • They are very different in English even though they may sound similar.

  • But I want you to be able to pronounce them differently and correctly.

  • So let's take two example words.

  • The first example word is 'jag'.

  • Can you hear this 'dg' sound?

  • 'jag'

  • The other word is 'zag'.

  • Can you hear the /z/ sound?

  • 'zag'

  • So 'jag' and 'zag'.

  • I know they sound similar but they are different.

  • We are going to practice together, and by the end of this video, I promise you will pronounce them correctly.

  • So let's get started.

  • Before we learn about the consonant sounds /ʤ/ and /z/ in English,

  • you should know about the I.P.A. spelling, guys.

  • It's very useful.

  • Also you can watch me and how I move my mouth.

  • And of course always try to repeat after me in this video.

  • You can make those sounds, guys.

  • Let's do it together.

  • First, let's learn how to make the /ʤ/ sound in English.

  • So this is a voiced sound.

  • You're going to use your voice and feel the vibration in your throat.

  • What you do is, you place your tongue up there,

  • it doesn't move,

  • but your mouth is going to come out

  • and you're going to produce a sound using your throat.

  • You have to feel that vibration, okay so

  • /ʤ/

  • So please repeat after me.

  • /ʤ/

  • Let's practice with the word 'jag'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'jag'

  • Good.

  • Let's now move on to the /z/ sound.

  • It is voiced as well.

  • You're going to use your voice and feel the vibration in your throat.

  • You put your tongue against your bottom teeth.

  • Your teeth should practically touch each other.

  • And you're going to produce that vibration using your voice, okay so...

  • /z/

  • So, please repeat after me.

  • /z/

  • Let's use the word 'zag'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'zag'

  • Good.

  • Let's now practice using minimal pairs.

  • These words that sound almost the same

  • but not exactly.

  • And they're extremely good if you really want to focus on the difference between the two sounds.

  • First, let's focus on the sounds.

  • Watch how I move my mouth and repeat after me.

  • First

  • /ʤ/

  • And now the /z/ sound. Repeat after me.

  • /z/

  • Let's now do both.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • /ʤ/

  • /z/

  • /ʤ/

  • /z/

  • /ʤ/

  • /z/

  • Let's now use our words.

  • Please repeat after me, guys.

  • 'jag'

  • 'zag'

  • 'jag'

  • 'zag'

  • 'jag'

  • 'zag'

  • Great.

  • Let's now go through minimal pairs together.

  • Please watch how I move my mouth and repeat after me.

  • Let's get started.

  • barge

  • bars

  • binge

  • bin

  • budge

  • buzz

  • cage

  • Ks

  • change

  • chains

  • charge

  • chars

  • forge

  • fours

  • fridge

  • frizz

  • fudge

  • fuzz

  • gauge

  • gaze

  • gorge

  • gauze

  • grange

  • grains

  • jest

  • zest

  • Jew

  • zoo

  • jig

  • zig

  • page

  • pays

  • purge

  • purrs

  • rage

  • raise

  • siege

  • seize

  • singe

  • sins

  • stage

  • stays

  • strange

  • strains

  • tinge

  • tins

  • wage

  • ways

  • Good job, guys.

  • Let's now practice with a few sentences containing these consonant sounds.

  • Our first sentence is:

  • 'The actor stays on stage.'

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'The actor stays on stage.'

  • The second sentence:

  • 'A strange virus strain made her sick.'

  • Please repeat after.

  • 'A strange virus strain made her sick.'

  • And finally: 'There are ways to increase your wage.'

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'There are ways to increase your wage.'

  • Very good.

  • Moving on.

  • Let's now move on to listening practice.

  • I'm now going to show you two words.

  • I will say one of the two words,

  • and I want you to listen very carefully and to tell me if this word is,

  • 'a)' or 'b)'

  • Let's get started.

  • Let's start, guys.

  • So which word do I say?

  • 'a' or 'b'?

  • Listen to me.

  • 'tins'

  • One more time.

  • 'tins'

  • Was this word 'a' or word 'b'?

  • Word 'b' of course, 'tins'.

  • Word 'a' is tinge.

  • What about now?

  • 'zest' 'zest'

  • It's 'b', 'zest'

  • 'a' is 'jest'. Listen to me, guys.

  • 'rage' 'rage'

  • 'a' or 'b'?

  • It's 'a', 'rage'.

  • 'b' is 'raise'.

  • 'singe' 'singe'

  • It's 'a', 'singe'.

  • 'b' is 'sins'.

  • Which one do I say now?

  • 'bars' 'bars'

  • 'b' Very good. 'bars'

  • 'a' is 'barge'.

  • Now listen.

  • 'ways' 'ways'

  • It's 'b', 'ways'.

  • 'a' is wage.

  • 'charge' 'charge'

  • It's 'a', students, 'charge'.

  • 'b' would be 'chars'.

  • 'zoo'

  • It's 'b' obviously, 'zoo'.