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  • Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Neil. Joining me today is Tom. Hi there, Tom.

  • Hello Neil and hello to our audience.

  • Good news for Italy; bad news for England. Italy have won Euro 2020.

  • If you want to test yourself on the vocabulary you hear in this

  • programme, there's a quiz on our website at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • Now, let's hear some more about the story from this BBC News report:

  • So, Euro 2020 has finished.

  • Sunday evening was the final, the final match here in London.

  • Italy woncongratulations to Italyand England lost on penalties.

  • That's the end of the story, Neil, unfortunately.

  • Yes... yeah. Difficult one for us isn't it, Tom?

  • But congratulations to Italy. You've been looking around the

  • various news websites at this story and what have you got?

  • I have: 'erupts', 'shoulders blame' and 'broke into'.

  • 'Erupts', 'shoulders blame' and 'broke into'.

  • Let's have a look then at your first headline.

  • My first headline, Neil, is from Reutersit says:

  • 'Erupts' – expresses something suddenly and with force.

  • Now Tom, 'erupt' – that's got something to do with a volcano,

  • hasn't it? Is that what we're talking aboutvolcanoes?

  • It does, yeah. If you think about what the volcano does:

  • it explodes and the lava comes out.

  • The verb that we would use for this is 'erupt'. It's very dramatic.

  • Yeah. So, why are we talking about a football match and this word?

  • I think it's... it's very dramatic, the imagery,

  • when we use 'erupt' like this in a figurative way.

  • If you think of a volcano and everything goes bang!

  • It happens very quickly and it's very intense.

  • I imagine when Italy scored their final penalty last night

  • that a lot of celebrations 'erupted' in the country.

  • They came suddenly and quickly, and they were very strong and dramatic.

  • Yeah. Now what words do we use around this word 'erupt'?

  • So, we would actually normally use this with a preposition 'in'

  • or 'into', like 'in' is in the headline. If we say, 'The Italians erupted,'

  • it's not very specificcould actually mean they exploded.

  • So, if you 'erupt in' celebration or 'erupt into' celebration,

  • it tells you the state that you enter quickly.

  • Yeah. And as you've already said, it's dramatic

  • and we use this to talk about extreme emotions, don't we?

  • So, joy but also the negative side of thingsviolence.

  • Yeah. Yeah, precisely. It can have a negative use as well.

  • It's very common to see the expression 'erupt into violence'.

  • So, if you think about violence that happens very quickly and is

  • intense and dramatic, we would also use this expression 'erupt'.

  • Yeah. And we've been looking at it here as a verb,

  • but it also exists as a noun: 'eruption'.

  • Yeah. 'Eruption' – E-R-U-P-T-I-O-N – is the noun form.

  • OK. Let's get a summary:

  • Well, things change quickly in football, don't they?

  • It seems like only a couple of years ago, we were talking about the

  • fact that Italy hadn't qualified for the 2018 World Cup and now

  • they're European champions. Where can our viewers find that story?

  • They can find it by clicking the link in the description of the video.

  • OK. Let's have a look at your next headline.

  • Sure. My next headline, Neil, is from here in the UK.

  • It's from the Independentit says:  

  • And that language is 'shoulders blame'.

  • 'shoulders blame' – accepts responsibility.

  • 'Shoulders blame'. 'Shoulders blame' is a fixed expression

  • means accept responsibility. 'Blame' is negative responsibility.

  • So, the headline is saying that Gareth Southgate,

  • the manager of England, accepts the 'blame': he 'shoulders'

  • or takes the negative responsibility for the defeat of his country's team.

  • Yeah. Now, I know what a 'shoulder' is.

  • That's this thing hereit's part of the body.

  • So, why are we talking about a part of the body and this 'blame'.

  • We did a News Review recently, Neil, about a word 'burden'

  • and 'burden' is kind of, like, a heavy negative responsibility.

  • And if you 'shoulder a burden', it means that you carry it.

  • You kind of carry it and it weighs heavily around your 'shoulders'.

  • So, you've got this sort of... the imagery

  • makes it as if you've got a weight around you

  • that's uncomfortable, you know.

  • Yeah. It's a kind of figurative weight.

  • You know, if you ever go backpacking or something,

  • you carry the rucksack on your 'shoulders' and there's a weight.

  • This is a figurative weight: the weight of 'blame'.

  • It is and actually we have another expression in English, Neil,

  • which is if... you know, if you feel relief, if you lose responsibility,

  • you can say, 'That's a weight off my shoulders.' So,

  • you don't have to carry it any more, yeah.

  • So, 'shoulders the blame' is accepts or carries responsibility

  • We can use 'shoulder' also as a verb in another sense.

  • We can. This is a bit more literal – a bit more, kind of,

  • practical if you will. Imagine if someone...

  • if you go shopping and someone bangs into you with the shoulderbang!

  • And they push you out of the waythey 'shoulder you' or they 'shoulder

  • into you'. If you push someone with your shoulder, you 'shoulder' them.

  • OK. Let's get a summary:

  • So, we've been talking about the use of 'shoulder' and we mentioned a

  • previous News Review about overwork. Where can our viewers find that, Tom?

  • Same as ever, Neil: please go in the video description and click the link.

  • OK. Let's have our next headline please.

  • Our next headline is from at home, the BBCit says:

  • 'Broke into' – entered without permission.

  • 'Broke into' – the phrasal verb.

  • The phrasal verb in the present is 'break into'.

  • And if you 'break into' somewhere, you enter without permission.

  • The headline uses 'broke' because it's in the past;

  • the final has finished. The headline is referring to

  • some England fans who entered Wembley Arena illegally.

  • They didn't have a ticket. They didn't have permission to be there.

  • So, we use this phrasal verb 'break into'.

  • Yeah. And it starts with the word 'break'.

  • Are they actually 'breaking' something?

  • Is it helpful to think in those terms?

  • Hmmm... kind of.

  • We often use 'break into' with crime, especially kind of stealing or

  • thievery, and if you think... if you enter someone's house without

  • permission, you might 'break' the window to get into the house.

  • So, you would often see it in a context of crime.

  • Yeahalso exists as a noun:

  • we can describe when someone 'breaks into' a property

  • as 'a break-in'.

  • A 'break-in', yeah. Spelt the same: a 'break-in' is an act

  • or an instance of entering someone's property without permission,

  • probably to steal things.

  • Yeah. Be careful though:

  • the verb is 'break into', but the noun is 'break-in' without 'into'.

  • Yeah, and we have other meanings as well that we can use 'break

  • into' for, kind of similar to 'eruption' that we were talking

  • about at the start, actually. So, we could say that last

  • night the Italian supporters 'broke into celebration'.

  • It means they started to celebrate very quickly. It happened like that.

  • Yeah and people can 'break into song' as well. They... if people are in a

  • good mood or something at a party, they might 'break into song'.

  • I'm sure there were a lot of Italians in Rome and all round Italy

  • 'breaking into song' last night when they won the football, Neil.

  • Yes. Whereas here, there was total and utter silence.

  • Yeah. I went to bed straight afterwards actually.

  • OK. Let's get a summary:

  • OK. Tom, time now just to recap the vocabulary please.

  • Of course. Today's vocabulary:  

  • we have 'erupts' – expresses something suddenly and with force.

  • 'Shoulders blame' – accepts responsibility.

  • And 'broke into' – entered without permission.

  • If you want to test yourself on the vocabulary,

  • there's a quiz on our website at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • And you can find us all over social media.

  • Thanks for joining us and goodbye.

  • Bye!

Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

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Italy win Euro 2020 - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/07/13
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