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  • Vanessa: Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Good morning, let's talk about it.

  • We all get up in the morning, right?

  • Even if you are working from home, or watching your kids from home, or not leaving the house

  • much in general, you still have a morning routine.

  • A great way to remember new English phrases is to use them in your daily life, so today

  • I'd like to invite you to join me on my morning routine as I talk about phrasal verbs that

  • you can use in the morning during your routine as you get ready for the day.

  • Are you ready to join me?

  • Let's go.

  • Every morning I wake up to my alarm clock, or I wake up to my baby.

  • I try not to doze off again and push snooze but sometimes I do.

  • Finally I turn off my alarm clock and roll out of bed.

  • Notice the pronunciation of this phrasal verb to roll out of bed.

  • I didn't say I roll out of bed, I said I roll out of bed.

  • The T here is going to change to a D sound, and this means that you are not so enthusiastic

  • about waking up, you just roll out of bed.

  • You could also say I get out of bed, that's a more neutral phrasal verb, but if you want

  • to let people know you are really tired when you woke up this morning you might say, oh,

  • when my alarm clock went off I just rolled out of bed, walked to the car and went to

  • work.

  • You are kind of like a zombie this morning, you just rolled out a bed.

  • Next I go into the bathroom and wash off my face.

  • Wash off does not mean that I am completely erasing my face.

  • You can just say wash my face, but we can also use this phrasal verb wash off my face

  • if you feel like you have some kind of dirt or grime that's kind of thick on your face.

  • Maybe after you were sleeping there's some, we call this sleep, that kind of crusty stuff

  • in your eyes, you might want to wash the sleep out of your eyes.

  • So we are washing it out, wash the sleep out of my eyes or wash off my face.

  • Next I will put on some makeup.

  • Usually I just put on some makeup under my eyes to mask how tired I really am and I will

  • put that away.

  • Sometimes I put on my glasses for the day and sometimes I choose to put in my contacts.

  • Now we're saying put on my glasses because they're going on my face, but I'm putting

  • in my contacts because they're going effectively in my eyeball, they're going in my eyes.

  • So I put in my contacts and I put on my glasses.

  • After I've washed off my face, put on some makeup, put in my contacts or put on my glasses,

  • it's time to brush out my hair.

  • We could say simply brush out my hair and that means you're getting the knots out of

  • your hair, or it could mean that you're taking your hair out of some kind of thing.

  • For me, this is a braid, so I'm taking my hair out of the braid and I'm brushing out

  • my hair.

  • It's kind of like erasing the knots from my hair, I'm brushing out the knots from my hair

  • and now it is wavy.

  • Usually I do this on days that I record videos, on other days my hair is just a wild mess,

  • but because I am recording a video today you get to see behind the scenes, taking my hair

  • out of braids, it is a simple and easy way to have a wavy hair.

  • And I think it's a lot of fun, you get to have braids, you get to have wavy hair, and

  • it's as you can see takes 10 seconds.

  • Amazing.

  • That's what I like the most.

  • I don't know about you but I hardly ever have my hair down.

  • This is what it's called when your hair is not tied back.

  • This is a hair tie, there are a lot of regional words for what to call this thing.

  • I call it a hair tie, but because I'm a mother, I have two young children, I'm always looking

  • down or helping or playing and working in the garden, I'm always doing a lot of things,

  • I can't have my hair in my face.

  • So that means that I need to use a hair tie and I need to tie back my hair.

  • We can use two different phrasal verbs for this.

  • We can say tie back or tie up, and you can kind of get the image here.

  • I'm tying it back or I'm tying it up, and it means the same thing.

  • I'm making this.

  • Do you know what this is called?

  • It's a little bit strange, it's called a pony tail.

  • A pony is a small horse but you can get the image of a tail of a horse kind of looks like

  • this, right?

  • Swish, swish, swish.

  • So I'm making a ponytail in the back of my hair.

  • What if I had two?

  • What if I had two of these and I wanted to tie up my hair like this?

  • Ooh, do you know what these are called when you have two hair ties?

  • Well It is not a pony tail because ponies don't have two tails.

  • Instead these are called pigtails Pigs don't have two tails but I guess this is just referring

  • to how a tail of a pig is kind of curly, maybe originally pigtails were kind of curly.

  • I'm not exactly sure but these are pigtails.

  • Sometimes I wear pigtails, sometimes I don't but they kind of get in the way when I'm trying

  • to do things so usually I use that first expression, I tie back my hair or I use a clip, and we

  • could say I pull back my hair.

  • So here you can see I'm pulling back my hair and putting it up in this clip.

  • So here we used similar ideas but with two different verbs, to tie up, to tie back, to

  • pull up, and to pull back, it just depends on what kind of device you're using, a clip

  • or a hair tie.

  • They're kind of interchangeable too, you can pull back your hair with a hair tie, no one's

  • going to figuratively split hairs over this.

  • This means get upset about small little differences, nobody's going to get upset about these small

  • differences, so you can use them interchangeably.

  • Next, very important, I've got my toothbrush and I need to put on the toothpaste and simply

  • brush my teeth.

  • I need to spit out the toothpaste.

  • After spitting out the toothpaste I need to put back my toothbrush into the little toothbrush

  • cup.

  • Now that I'm ready from the shoulders up I need to get dressed.

  • Specifically I need to pick out my clothes.

  • I think I'm going to wear this dress today, it's a lovely summer day, so I picked this

  • out.

  • I do have a closet where I could put clothes, but for some reason I just like to have this

  • little bar here to put my most used clothes on.

  • I find myself more likely to hang them up and to take care of them if it's really close

  • to my bed where I get changed and I change my clothes before I go to bed, it's easy for

  • me to remember this.

  • I also have some drawers, some dresser drawers, with some clothes in them like socks or pants,

  • things like this, but it is summertime so I'm going to only wear this sun dress that

  • I picked out.

  • Usually by then my baby is awake and it's time for me to pick him up.

  • Good morning baby.

  • Is that how you feel about the morning?

  • You want to tell us what it's like to be a baby?

  • What's it like to be a baby?

  • Is that really what it's like?

  • Oh wow.

  • Yeah, little sweetie.

  • I never drink coffee but most mornings I make some tea.

  • To make tea I need to heat up some water in a kettle.

  • We can call this a tea kettle, a hot water kettle, or just a kettle.

  • And after the water has heated up I need to pour out the water into my teapot.

  • After the tea has steeped for three or four minutes I need to pour out the tea into my

  • mug, or we could say simply I need to pour the tea, or we could say pour out the tea,

  • that's fine, or we could say I'm going to fill up my mug with some delicious tea.

  • This is some green tea that I added some dried lavender to.

  • I have a lavender bush in my yard and I put some dry lavender in here and added it to

  • the green tea, it smells amazing.

  • I forgot to show you but I also whip up some breakfast.

  • To whip up means that you're making something really quickly.

  • Usually it's not very thoughtful, it's pretty simple, and for me this morning I just whipped

  • up a piece of toast.

  • Typically this means that you're making something instead of just cutting something.

  • So for example part of my breakfast is this cantaloupe that came from our garden.

  • A cantaloupe is a melon, I don't know if they have it in your country, but it's pretty typical

  • here.

  • We actually grew this in our garden.

  • When I cut this cantaloupe I wouldn't say that I whipped up the cantaloupe because I

  • didn't make it, I didn't create this, even though yes it did come from our garden.

  • But instead, because the toast, I put some butter on it, I put some jam on it, I actually

  • made it in a way, we could say I whipped up some breakfast.

  • But if you're just opening a granola bar and eating a granola bar, or if you're just cutting

  • a piece of fruit and eating it, you're not really whipping up breakfast.

  • You have to have some kind of making or creating that happens.

  • So for me I whipped up breakfast, I made a piece of toast, and then I cut up this cantaloupe.

  • Finally it's time for me to go over my plans for the day.

  • Go over is simply another way to say review.

  • Usually I try to be pretty organized because there's so much going on in my life.

  • I have a toddler, a newborn, a husband, so I need to keep up my relationship.

  • I'm also an individual so I need to do things for myself as well, and I am your English

  • teacher and I run my own English teaching business, so there's a lot of different hats

  • that I have to wear.

  • For me the key to my sanity is to keep organized.

  • So I usually have a list of the things that I want to accomplish that day or maybe that

  • week, and in the morning I go over my plans for the day.

  • Because I work here from home I don't need to go anywhere to work, but if you are going

  • to the office at the end of your morning routine, when you open the door of your house and leave

  • your house, you can say I'm heading out the door.

  • This isn't just your head going out the door, it just means that you're leaving your house.

  • I'm heading out the door or I'm heading to work.

  • We use that expression head to talk about the movement here.

  • I'm heading out the door, I'm heading to work.

  • Where are you going?

  • I'm heading to work.

  • Great.

  • We can use this phrasal verb.

  • I hope that you enjoyed following me on my morning routine.

  • Now I have a question for you.

  • Can you use three of these phrasal verbs to describe your morning routine?

  • It's time to take action and use what you've learned.

  • Please write a comment below using three of these phrasal verbs to tell us what you do

  • in the morning.

  • Thanks so much for learning English with me, and I'll see you again next Friday for a new

  • lesson here on my YouTube channel.

  • Bye.

  • The next step is to download my free ebook Five Steps to Becoming a Confident English

  • Speaker.

  • You'll learn what you need to do to speak confidently and fluently.

  • Don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel for more free lessons.

  • Thanks so much.

  • Bye.

Vanessa: Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 US hair tie morning phrasal tea morning routine

30 Phrasal Verbs for your Morning Routine

  • 15 4
    Justin Ho posted on 2021/07/12
Video vocabulary