Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak.

  • I'm Feifei.

  • And I'm Roy! Feifei, have you listened to

  • the latest song by my favourite band,

  • Dragon Tennis?

  • Dragon Tennis are a terrible band

  • who make dreadful music. Mic drop!

  • What?! I think the lead singer dropped

  • the microphone once.

  • You can't hate them because of that!

  • No, Roy. We say 'mic drop' at the end of a

  • sentence after we have made an impressive

  • or pertinent point in a discussion,

  • rendering the conversation over.

  • Oh, so our conversation is finished?

  • OK. Well, that makes sense about

  • the expression 'mic drop'.

  • Yes, we can also use it after you've

  • just finished roasting someone.

  • Yes, for example: Feifei, your taste in

  • music is terrible which is why you don't

  • appreciate Dragon Tennis. Mic drop!

  • Very good example, but not true.

  • Let's listen to these examples.

  • Your idea is the worst thing

  • I've ever heard! Mic drop.

  • I can't believe he ended his

  • message with 'mic drop'.

  • He's so wrong and the discussion is not over!

  • This is undoubtedly the best game ever.

  • Mic drop!

  • This is The English We Speak from

  • BBC Learning English, and we're talking about

  • the expression 'mic drop', which is commonly

  • used at the end of a discussion when someone

  • makes a point that ends the conversation.

  • Yes, it's quite common in messages or emails.

  • It's also seen with the verb 'perform'.

  • That's right: 'perform a mic drop'.

  • I use this a lot when I'm discussing

  • things with people and I know I'm right.

  • It's true that you say that a lot.

  • I think you've explained the

  • expression really well.

  • It's true! My job here is done. Mic drop!

  • Very good use of 'mic drop'.

  • What else shall we teach now?

  • Nothing. I was serious when I said mic drop.

  • Bye.

  • Bye!

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak.

  • I'm Feifei.

  • And I'm Roy! Hey, Feifei, do you fancy doing

  • some karaoke tonight with me and Rob?

  • No, I do not. The last time we went out with

  • Rob, you two managed to upset everyone.

  • Everyone left. He is tone deaf!

  • His singing is not that bad!

  • His mum says he's got a lovely voice!

  • No, Roy.

  • While tone deaf can relate to someone who

  • can't hear notes and has difficulty singing

  • like you - it can also mean someone who

  • is unaware or insensitive to a situation.

  • Ah, so you mean the fact that Rob

  • said that he prefers cats during the

  • annual dog welfare meeting.

  • Yes, that was a bit off.

  • He always says the wrong

  • things at the wrong time!

  • He really is tone deaf.

  • Let's listen to these examples.

  • People who say they've enjoyed

  • lockdown can sound a bit tone deaf.

  • So many people have lost their jobs.

  • We've all been working so hard.

  • The boss seemed tone deaf when

  • he rejected our pay rise.

  • I can't believe Sarah said she

  • doesn't believe in global warming

  • to those activists. She's tone deaf.

  • This is The English We Speak from

  • BBC Learning English, and we're

  • talking about the expression 'tone deaf'.

  • It can be used to describe someone

  • who can't sing, but also has

  • a secondary meaning that refers

  • to someone who can't understand

  • the sensitive nature of a situation.

  • Yes. It's an interesting development of the meaning.

  • So, 'deaf' refers to someone who can't hear,

  • while 'tone deaf' describes someone

  • who can't hear different tones or sounds.

  • Yes, that's right. And the new meaning

  • is for someone who says the wrong

  • thing at the wrong time - like Rob.

  • Yes, it sometimes gets used to refer to

  • authority figures who say something that seems

  • to be out-of-touch with a certain situation.

  • That's right! And, Roy, please don't sing tonight.

  • You really are tone deaf when it comes to singing.

  • Your singing makes dogs bark.

  • Yeah, maybe that's for the best.

  • But then I think the dogs just want

  • to be in the same band as me.

  • I could create a new band

  • called 'Roy and the Dogs'.

  • I can't believe you just said that!

  • I just formed a band called

  • 'Feifei and the Cats'.

  • Your comment was tone deaf.

  • Bye, Roy.

  • Bye!

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei.

  • There you go, Feifei, one

  • skinny cappuccino for you.

  • Thanks, Neil. It's good to get away

  • from the office, and I like this cafe.

  • It's very stylish, for you!

  • I will take that as a compliment.

  • Now, shall we get down to business?

  • 'Get down to business'?

  • Do we have to talk about business?

  • I thought we'd forget about work,

  • relax, talk about... your holiday plans.

  • Where are you going this year?

  • Sorry, Feifei, we need

  • to talk shop for a minute.

  • Shoppping! I'd love to talk about shopping.

  • No. Talk shop.

  • Which shop?

  • Our shop. I mean our work.

  • To talk shop means to talk about work,

  • even when you're not at work!

  • Oh right! And do we talk shop to just anyone?

  • No, Feifei, just to the people we work with.

  • I don't think anyone else would be interested.

  • Let's hear from some more

  • people who are 'talking shop'.

  • We went to the pub to celebrate Rob's

  • birthday but inevitably we started talking shop!

  • I bumped into my boss on the train home

  • tonight and he talked shop all the way to my stop.

  • We've been at work all day, let's all have

  • some fun and not talk shop please!

  • This is The English We Speak from

  • BBC Learning English and we're talking

  • about the phrase 'talk shop'.

  • It means to talk to people you work with

  • about work, even when you're not at work.

  • So come on then, Neil.

  • Let's talk about work, if we have to.

  • Thanks. I brought you to this cafe so we could

  • talk about all the scripts I've got to write.

  • You want me to write some scripts,

  • that's why you bought me a coffee?

  • Of course not. I just need some ideas for

  • some authentic English phrases to write about.

  • That's why I needed to...

  • ... talk shop.

  • Exactly.

  • No! 'Talk shop', that's an English

  • phrase you can write about.

  • Brilliant, Feifei! Wow, these

  • scripts just write themselves.

  • Fancy another coffee?

  • Only if we stop talking shop!

  • Bye.

  • Neil, what are you doing?

  • That's the biggest spreadsheet I've ever seen!

  • Hi, Feifei. Yes, just you wait.

  • I'm developing a product that will

  • revolutionise English teaching!

  • Great. So why are you looking at

  • screens of numbers?

  • Not numbers, data. Big data!

  • This is what I need.

  • And that is the expression we're

  • talking about in The English We Speak.

  • How do you plan to use this data?

  • I haven't figured it out yet.

  • But that's not important.

  • Everyone's talking about big data.

  • It is a hot topic.

  • But big data is all about analysis.

  • You need to know what to do with all that data.

  • Right.

  • What you are looking at is a list of

  • football scores from every country in 1987?!

  • Ah, yes. Not useful?

  • Sadly not! Let's listen to this

  • explanation of what big data actually is.

  • We are surrounded by data.

  • Every time we use social media, buy

  • something online, or even search

  • for information, we are creating data.

  • Because there's so much of it,

  • and because it comes

  • in many forms, we call it big data.

  • Companies collect and analyse big data

  • to discover hidden trends and patterns.

  • For example, online retailers use big data

  • to learn what kinds of things customers like,

  • so they can suggest new products to buy.

  • You're listening to The English We

  • Speak from BBC Learning English.

  • Our expression in this

  • programme is 'big data'.

  • So, Neil, how's your research going now?

  • Not well. It's hard to know where to start.

  • Well, you'll probably need information

  • on things like spending patterns on

  • language learning apps, key times users

  • log in and how long sessions last,

  • how demand varies by language level,

  • data on first languages, data on

  • which kind of content is most...

  • OK. Stop, stop, stop. I'm trying

  • to write all this down. Feifei?

  • Yes?

  • Can I hire you as a big data analyst?

  • Sorry, Neil, you're too late.

  • I'm launching a product of my own.

  • It helps predict football scores.

  • In fact, I need a bit more data from...1987!

  • Well, I might just be able

  • to help you out there!

  • Yes, I think you were actually

  • looking at my screen earlier.

  • Sorry! You know, I think I'll leave

  • this big data stuff to the experts.

  • Bye.

  • Bye.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei.

  • And me, Roy.

  • Roy, please will you sit down!

  • It's really annoying with you

  • always just standing there!

  • No, I refuse to sit down!

  • I haven't sat down for the whole week.

  • I heard you talking about 'a sticking point'

  • the other day, and after you played a joke

  • on me and glued me to the chair.

  • I will not sit down ever again!

  • No, Roy! 'A sticking point' refers to a

  • problem or issue that prevents progress

  • towards a goal or an agreement.

  • I was talking about negotiating

  • my new work contract.

  • I think I should be given 'unicorn truffles'

  • everyday as part of the job.

  • Wait, so a sticking point in your new

  • contract is that you want unicorn truffles?

  • Yes! I also asked for an eagle called Clive.

  • But I want unicorn truffles.

  • That's a great idea.

  • I might ask for free unicorn truffles too.

  • Sorry, Roy. That's only for amazing people

  • like menow sit down and let's listen

  • to these examples.

  • Trade tariffs were a sticking point

  • in the negotiations.