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  • In this video, I'm going to focus on two initial consonant sounds in English.

  • The /t/ sound and the /d/ sound.

  • They may be confusing because they sound quite similar.

  • But they are very different.

  • And they are important sounds in the English language.

  • So I want you to be able to pronounce them correctly.

  • Let's start with two example words.

  • The first example word is the word 'ten' with a 't' sound.

  • 'ten'

  • It's different from 'den' with a 'd' sound.

  • 'den'

  • So 'ten', 'den'.

  • Can you hear the difference?

  • Well if you can't, practice with me.

  • By the end of this video, I promise you you'll be able to pronounce them correctly.

  • Let's get started.

  • Before we learn about these initial consonant sounds /t/ and /d/ in English,

  • please remember to check the I.P.A spelling - it's very useful.

  • You can also watch how I move my mouth, and of course repeat after me in this video.

  • You can make those sounds.

  • Let's do it together.

  • First, let's learn how to produce this /t/ sound in English.

  • /t/ It's voiceless.

  • You're not using your voice.

  • No vibration in your throat.

  • You're just going to push out some air.

  • You put your tongue against your top teeth and you push out some air.

  • /t/ Please repeat after me.

  • /t/

  • /t/

  • /t/

  • Let's practice with the word 'ten'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'ten'

  • 'ten' 'ten'

  • Good.

  • And now moving on to the /d/ sound.

  • The tongue is in the same place as with the /t/ sound.

  • It's actually the same but this /d/ sound is voiced.

  • You're going to use your voice and your throat is going to vibrate.

  • So you put your tongue against your top teeth but this time you don't push out some air

  • you produce a sound.

  • So, /d/.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • /d/

  • /d/

  • /d/

  • Let's practice with the word 'den'.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'den'

  • 'den'

  • 'den'

  • Great.

  • Let's now practice using minimal pairs.

  • These words that are almost the same but the sounds are different.

  • They're very good if you want to focus on the differences between the sounds.

  • First let's focus on the sounds themselves.

  • Watch my mouth - repeat after me, please.

  • First the /t/ sound.

  • /t/

  • /t/

  • /t/

  • Now the /d/ sound.

  • /d/

  • /d/

  • /d/

  • Let's now do both. Please repeat after me.

  • /t/

  • /d/

  • /t/

  • /d/

  • /t/

  • /d/

  • Just a trick.

  • The /t/ sound is voiceless.

  • The /d/ sound is voiced.

  • If you really want to make sure that you can do it properly,

  • what you can do is you put your hand in front of your mouth

  • If it's voiceless, it means that you're going to push out some air.

  • And you're going to feel some air on your hands.

  • /t/

  • You can actually feel the air on your hand.

  • If it's voiced, you won't.

  • But if it's voiced, if you put your hands on your throat, you can feel the vibration,

  • okay.

  • So you can do that to make sure that you pronounce correctly.

  • Let's now move on to our words.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'ten'

  • 'den'

  • 'ten'

  • 'den'

  • 'ten'

  • 'den'

  • Great job, guys.

  • Okay, guys.

  • Time to go through minimal pairs together.

  • Please watch how I move my mouth and repeat after me.

  • Let's go.

  • tab dab

  • tail dale

  • tame dame

  • tamp damp

  • tank dank

  • tart dart

  • teal deal

  • team deem

  • tear dear

  • tech deck

  • teed deed

  • teen dean

  • tell dell

  • tent dent

  • tick Dick

  • tied died

  • tie die

  • tier deer

  • till dill

  • tin din

  • tine dine

  • tint dint

  • tip dip

  • tire dire

  • to do

  • toast dosed

  • tock dock

  • toe doe

  • toes dose

  • tomb doom

  • ton done

  • tongue dung

  • torn dawn

  • tote dote

  • touch Dutch

  • tough duff

  • tout doubt

  • town down

  • train drain

  • tresses dresses

  • try dry

  • tub dub

  • tuck duck

  • tug dug

  • tummy dummy

  • tusk dusk

  • tux ducks

  • tike dike

  • tyre dire

  • two do

  • Great, guys.

  • Time now to practice with sentences containing these consonant sounds.

  • Sentence number one: 'Just dip the tip.'

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'Just dip the tip.'

  • Sentence two: 'The dummy hurt his tummy.'

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'The dummy hurt his tummy.'

  • And finally: 'Try to dry and drain the wet train.'

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'Try to dry and drain the wet train.'

  • Good job.

  • Let's move on.

  • Let's now move on to listening practice.

  • I'm now going to show you two words.

  • I will say one of the two words, and I want you to listen very carefully and

  • to tell me if this word is, 'a)' or 'b)'

  • Let's get started.

  • Let's start with our first two words.

  • Which word do I say?

  • 'a' or 'b'?

  • Listen.

  • 'tyre'

  • One more time.

  • 'tyre'

  • Word 'a', 'tyre'.

  • 'b' is 'dire'.

  • What about this one?

  • 'dry'

  • 'dry'

  • It's word 'b' guys, 'dry'.

  • Word 'a' is 'try'.

  • 'dank'

  • 'dank'