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  • The mud actually feels good on your feet

  • Some kind of like spa treatment

  • Usually pay 100, right?

  • Hundreds of dollars, usually

  • In this video we're going to Peace & Nature NPO

  • Organic farm in Kobe Japan

  • Bahram, an Iranian man, alongside his wife Shinobu,

  • has worked to develop the farm for the past 18 years

  • Working side with their Japanese neighbors,

  • They strived to retain the appreciation of old method of Japanese farming

  • Integrating with that,

  • sustainability

  • technology

  • All at the same time

  • Pretty impressive, right?

  • He specifically accomplished by holding weekend events

  • Where participants can come, and experience first hand

  • What it is like to actually take part in this traditional style of communal planting

  • This is what you will see today

  • Along with the "community focus"

  • "community accomplished"

  • "traditional rice farming"

  • We're also going to hear from some of the students who participated

  • And don't be fooled, these students grew up in Japan

  • They're going to give insight on what farming means to them personally and community

  • and as well as how they are involved with the farm

  • for these technological initiatives that they have placed to help the environment

  • Naturally I was in a huge rush to discover what an completely inapt rice farmer I would make

  • but Bahram explained in our orientation that

  • That would be perceived by cutting down bamboo first

  • And that had 2 full purpose of helping the neighboring farmers,

  • but also because where the bamboo had grown up

  • was where the rice fields were before

  • So you needed to remove them first, before you can plant more

  • So it's just beyond this path

  • Up over the hill, we walked over the edge

  • I suppose of the local mountain range,

  • That is where you can do your bamboo chopping

  • As you can see you can see a lot of bamboo growing wild around

  • But it's covering a lot of rice field

  • And the idea is to clean up

  • So we can give identity to the village back

  • because there are beautiful rice there this year

  • And we can use the bamboo, because it's an amazing grass

  • It works very well in structure, even for architecture

  • but in this case, we will ground it,

  • make it into powder and use it for fertilizing the field

  • There's a lot going on at OZO Base

  • That involves youth and tries to get kids involved in youth programs

  • Get really in touch with nature

  • Do things like the rice planting

  • but that's an inward initiative

  • But they are also looking outward

  • with the power of technology

  • They have accomplished that in a variety of interesting ways as well.

  • My name is David, and for my school project I have collaborated with OZO base

  • to promote forest sustainability using social media

  • The # I created was #10000treechallengekobe

  • This project is intended for Kobe but

  • it is appreciated to become a global initiative

  • so please post planting a tree using the hashtag

  • And this will help this project and the environment

  • ok so we have our safety gear today

  • and we have our helmet since we don't know what will fall off a tree

  • And then we have our trusty blades

  • They were just saying as well that

  • because it rains so much

  • There's a lot of frogs

  • And frogs are food for snakes so

  • we got to be extra careful of those as well

  • Now here I'm going to give you guys a dark fact

  • Bamboo grows notoriously fast

  • For that reason, it was used a long long time ago,

  • as a torture device

  • where they would lay people over the bamboo,

  • and it will grow so quickly

  • but still agonizingly slow

  • but they would grow up through the person who were laid up on top of them

  • and kill them

  • You never thought you'd get that on Waoryu! ONLY in JAPAN, did you?

  • Unquestionably one of the highlights of the day was,

  • not only the younger kids,

  • but the students who participated in the day's event

  • were really enjoying the experience

  • We make this assumption about the younger generation

  • that they would only be entertained when we put them in front of a screen,

  • but when they were sharing their experience of enjoying this and why,

  • it really spoke to the contrary,

  • and demonstrated why functions like this are so

  • still valuable for youthful minds

  • Always nice when the vegetables harvest

  • because then my mom brings them home and we have fresh vegetables

  • and it's sustainable here so there are no chemicals

  • and things like that in the food you're eating

  • and you know where it's coming from, which is nice.

  • This is a perfect place I'm standing right here to highlight

  • how the shadow can cast over the rice field

  • and when you clear it out, when you clear out the bamboo that is,

  • these are collective fields in the sense that

  • they are right next to each other in the sense of ownership

  • There is peace and nature initiative here

  • for ONO compound

  • but there are also the locals who live here

  • who have their rice paddies next to each other

  • And when you clear out a space like this

  • you're helping yourself but you're also helping your neighbor

  • and that's another kind of active community they are trying to support

  • with the initiative here

  • Next up in our day

  • we're going to plant some rice

  • Now the thing about the planting we are doing today is that

  • it's obviously without any machine

  • The whole mentality here is,

  • sustainable

  • That means doing it yourself

  • I think it's very valuable to feel

  • directly connected to whatever that is

  • going to provide you with nourishment

  • FOOD

  • Today we got to directly participate in that,

  • and I think things are going to get pretty wet

  • because I was told I have to wear these half length pants

  • and we're going in bare foot

  • so there is no turning back now

  • In the west,

  • farming is thought as something individual or by each household

  • so they have been using machinery

  • but in the Japanese farming culture

  • is said to have started 6000 years ago in Yayoi period

  • and did not see the development of machinery

  • so a community of manpower was needed to grow crops

  • Today we're doing without the machine

  • When you have the machine you have it uniformly spaced for you

  • To overcome that, today we have on either side of the patty,

  • they have individuals with poles with string attached

  • which extends across the patties

  • and at intervals along that string was

  • red marks which indicates people that are planting

  • where they should put the rice in

  • It obviously take more time

  • but that tactile sense involved is cool

  • You plant one line across that string,

  • And those with poles move back half a foot,

  • and you continue

  • And another detail which is easy to make mistake

  • the line moves forward when you're putting in the rice

  • you always put it in the other side of the string

  • so it doesn't get pulled over when they move to the next line

  • The mud actually feels really good in your feet

  • yeah it's so satisfying

  • It's sort of like some spa treatment

  • You would usually pay 100s, right?

  • This would be 100s of dollars usually.

  • Yeah, for free

  • This war paint, is not simply because it feels cool to wear war paint

  • and I don't do this often

  • It actually has a totally practical reason

  • When you put this on,

  • you 're going to protect you from the sun

  • natural protectant against being burnt all day

  • Not only that

  • but if you have this mud on you,

  • of course it's going to protect you from the insects as well

  • Insects could be a huge irritant when you're out here so

  • finally getting to play in the mud like a kid

  • but this time with utility

  • is incredibly satisfying

  • Just as assuredly

  • as the sun burnt arms I got from this trip

  • I also earned appreciation for physical labor again

  • It was so much fun to get out there

  • go out to the act of planting rice

  • I've always been curious to do that

  • Thanks so much to Bahram and Steen

  • to being so accommodating

  • I feel like a changed man after this

  • I will never look at the food in Japan quite the same way

  • and be with a greater appreciation

  • Thank you as well for watching and tuning in

  • If you enjoyed this stuff please push the LIKE and comment

  • Maybe hit that bell notification

  • For now that's all. Have a great day

  • Take care out there and we'd see you in the next video

The mud actually feels good on your feet

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B1 rice bamboo planting farming mud string

How the Ancient Japanese planted rice- and how we can see it today | Kobe Japan

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    Summer posted on 2021/06/19
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