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  • Way back in those tall trees I saw giraffes

  • My goal is one shot and have the animal not take a step

  • I'm trying to make a humane kill, as quick as possible

  • Dan has travelled to Namibia

  • with a single mission

  • to track and kill an African animal

  • The realities of hunting is you kill something

  • That's true

  • But personally I would much rather live free out here

  • in the Kalahari and then die by a single gunshot wound

  • He's trophy hunting

  • We'll get close to the animal

  • I know we're close when Johnny tells me, load up

  • It's one of the most emotive and controversial sports in the world

  • I have maybe five seconds to make the shot

  • Sometimes I'm not quick enough

  • Sometimes I am

  • It may sound perverse

  • but people like Dan are actually helping

  • to conserve some of Africa's most iconic and endangered wildlife

  • Here's why

  • Images like these create intense debate

  • around trophy hunting online

  • Worldwide outrage tonight, over the death ofCecil the lion

  • Why are you shooting a lion in the first place?

  • Shoot him

  • Shoot him right between the ears

  • Yet campaigns and outrage on social media

  • often only tell part of the story

  • At the moment it's very one-sided

  • It's very emotional

  • It's also driven by people that have more resources than us

  • They have their Hollywood stars

  • that have never travelled and came

  • and sit underneath a tree with these communities

  • and understand where they are coming from

  • I can't understand what would motivate someone

  • to go and want to kill a lion for fun or any other animal for fun

  • There is a narrative that says these animals are threatened

  • and rich Americans generally are going out to shoot them

  • Of course that sounds very compelling

  • But the realities are much more complicated than that

  • Much media attention focuses on trophy hunting in Africa

  • but it actually takes place in countries all over the world

  • And in many as part of a diverse wildlife-conservation strategy

  • Americans do import the most mammal trophies

  • over 30,000 in 2017 alone

  • But trophy hunting is not driving any species to extinction

  • Conservation in general is very underfunded in Africa

  • when it comes to environment and conservation issues

  • they are normally at the bottom

  • of each of the African countries' agendas

  • And hunters can bring in valuable revenue

  • to fund conservation

  • and protect against threats such as poaching

  • Trophy fees can average $600 for an impala

  • over $10,000 for a lion

  • and even more for an elephant

  • with the hunts themselves often costing more

  • Dan has paid to hunt and kill an oryx

  • The whole hunting experience is very challenging

  • and I like that, I live for challenges

  • The challenge of trying to find the animal

  • the challenge of getting close enough to make an ethical shot

  • and then the final thing is when you pull the trigger

  • getting the bullet placement correct

  • so you make a clean, ethical kill

  • Growing up in Texas I've always hunted

  • but I've never hunted trophies until I came to Namibia

  • Namibia, where trophy hunting has been legal since the 1960s…

  • has more wildlife today

  • than at any point in at least the past 100 years

  • Yet the picture across Africa is bleak

  • Although exact numbers are subject to debate

  • In just over a century, elephant numbers have plummeted

  • Over 90% of black rhinos were lost between 1970-94…

  • although numbers have rebounded

  • And it's estimated that lions, which are notoriously hard to count

  • have been reduced by over 30% in just over a decade

  • But trophy hunting is not the major threat

  • facing any of these species in Africa today

  • The biggest threat to survival of wildlife in Africa

  • is the loss of habitat as human populations grow

  • Farming and urban development have taken up large swathes

  • of land previously occupied by wildlife

  • Take lions

  • Only 8% of their historical range remains

  • And they have reportedly vanished from 15 African countries

  • And this is where trophy hunting can actually help

  • Trophy hunting enables governments and other landowners

  • to maintain land under a wildlife-based use

  • and therefore reduces those threats of human encroachment

  • poaching and other very significant threats

  • When Marina Lamprecht bought this plot of land in Namibia

  • where Dan is hunting, it was a cattle ranch

  • In an area like this which was previously a cattle farm

  • wildlife had very little value above that of its meat

  • We now have a very large piece of dedicated wildlife area

  • and we fund it through very selective

  • very sustainable trophy hunting

  • I'll be back

  • Money from foreign hunters, like Dan

  • enables Marina to keep this land for wildlife

  • It's a very nice, quiet morning. Little bit of wind

  • I think it's a nice morning for hunting

  • Most people assume that trophy hunting is about killing

  • but that's not the part that I'm looking forward to

  • I enjoy the stalk, I enjoy the challenge of it

  • And yes you have to take the animal

  • but that's what funds this operation

  • And the local community, where Marina lives, benefits too

  • I have a deal with the local village elders

  • that I will feed the 260-plus children in the school

  • with meat from the hunt

  • but in exchange we have no poaching

  • or interference of any kind

  • And it's a system that works

  • It's all about involving local rural communities

  • in benefiting from the wildlife

  • If communities don't benefit from the wildlife

  • there's little incentive to look after it

  • Living on this landscape is hard

  • There's not much choices

  • And this wildlife is wild

  • People romanticise that these animals are beautiful

  • They are beautiful animals, but they are also very dangerous

  • And they can kill people or they can make our kids not go to school

  • If wildlife becomes an economic asset

  • people will want to protect it, rather than poach or kill it

  • Critics of trophy hunting say

  • that it only benefits the privileged in a country

  • like Marina, who operates a private farm

  • But in Namibia, and other countries, this is not always the case

  • Nearly 20% of its land is run by local communities

  • They choose how they want to use it

  • The communities use the land

  • as farmers, or they can be livestock owners

  • They can be crop-growers

  • The conservancies choose to have trophy hunting

  • it's also benefiting them financially

  • And that is the only way that we can motivate these communities

  • to be able to look after the lands for conservation values

  • at the moment

  • If trophy hunting is implemented well

  • and critically with the buy-in of local and national

  • communities and governments

  • you really can see an increase in the wildlife populations

  • According to international data

  • the only African countries with increasing populations

  • of wild lions

  • use trophy hunting

  • including of lions

  • as part of their wildlife management

  • And back in Namibia...

  • there were only 12 white rhinos in 1968…

  • since trophy hunting of them began in 1982…

  • their numbers have rebounded

  • And valuable revenue has been raised for their conservation

  • In order for countries to see these results

  • trophy hunting has to be well-implemented

  • As it is in Namibia

  • They are downwind from us

  • By law

  • Dan has to be accompanied

  • by a registered Namibian professional hunter

  • His guide today is Johnny

  • These are giraffe footprints

  • You can see it's very fresh

  • It's early from this morning

  • Only a maximum of 2% of certain species

  • can be killed in trophy hunting

  • and in many cases even less are taken

  • And there are strict government quotas

  • on which species of animal can be hunted

  • and for some species, which sex

  • For trophy hunting we don't shoot young animals

  • because we use these younger males for breeding

  • and big bulls they are not breeding big bulls

  • They don't breed anymore, they just eat and sleep

  • They've been searching for an old oryx bull for hours

  • I think we can get close to this oryx

  • because we have zebra here on the right

  • The zebra saw us

  • Namibia is a peaceful and reasonably well-governed country

  • Rifle

  • Load up

  • which is why trophy hunting can be well-managed here

  • But in other countries, it's not so simple

  • Trophy hunting is by no means a panacea

  • Done badly, it can negatively affect animal populations

  • For instance, around Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe

  • They had far too high quotas for male lions there

  • It just was completely unsustainable

  • Corruption can also be rife in some countries

  • Some estimate that across just seven African countries

  • trophy hunting brings in more than $200m a year

  • But it's often unclear

  • how much reaches local stakeholders

  • Yet in places where revenues do reach local people

  • trophy-hunting money is a financial life-line

  • For example, in Namibia

  • the annual revenue from hunting is $28.5m

  • And in Zimbabwe 770,000 households benefit in some way from it

  • In many cases, revenue from trophy hunting

  • can't be replaced by other incomes

  • There's a real misconception that photo-tourism

  • could easily be substituted for trophy hunting

  • in most places and that's just not the case

  • For tourism you need stability

  • you need low disease risk

  • you need infrastructure

  • you need scenic areas with lots of wildlife

  • In many, many hunting areas that's not the case

  • In Namibia frequent droughts make it difficult

  • for large tourist operations

  • But it's ideal terrain for hunters

  • And Johnny has spotted some prey

  • Hunting involves killing

  • It's just a necessary part of it

  • Is that what I'm here for?

  • Absolutely not

  • Is it necessary? Absolutely so

  • It's a big old bull

  • Get ready with the rifle

  • Safety off, safety off

  • You see it between the trees?

  • Yes

  • Just aim dead on his chest

  • Congratulations

  • He's down

  • I didn't see it until the last moment

  • because it was behind a tree, but Johnny knew it was there

  • It's a heart-lung shot

  • He went right down with one shot

  • I've seen trophy photos

  • which are disrespectful of the animal and I don't approve

  • But that's not the way we do it

  • We respect the animal, we honour it

  • we use every bit of it

  • so I think you can do it tastefully

  • and that's what we strive for

  • Calls for trophy-hunting bans are intensifying

  • Britain appears to be pushing ahead with a ban

  • on the import of trophies

  • And some American states have also pushed for import bans

  • But blanket bans and restrictions are not the answer

  • There is no conservation model in the world that is perfect

  • And I will also not claim that ours is perfect

  • Over the years we have managed to bring wildlife

  • back in areas in countries where it was nearly decimated

  • I fail to understand why would you like to close down

  • …a really good model that work for southern Africa?

  • With no immediate alternative to trophy hunting

  • vast areas of African habitat

  • more than that covered by national parks, would be put at risk

  • When people look for a ban on trophy hunting

  • because they find it morally unacceptable

  • What is the alternative that's going to be put in their place