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  • A protest breaks out in China People demand the truth

  • After a student dies mysteriously.

  • Welcome to China Uncensored. I'm Chris Chappell.

  • You don't see protests like this  very often in mainland China.

  • That's from the city of Chengdu.

  • Students outside of the No. 49  High School there were chanting  

  • We want the truth.” It wasn't long until  Chinese policehandledthe situation.

  • The crowd is demanding the truth of what happened  to a 17-year-old student at their school.  

  • They think authorities at the school and in  the government are covering up how he died.

  • The student, named Lin Weiqi, was  found dead at their school on May 9.  

  • His mother posted this on social media.

  • On May 9th at 9 o'clock, I received a notice  from the school that my son had passed away.  

  • The school simply informed me that the cause  of death was a fall from the corridor…” 

  • Now, the school is not letting the  parents in to see what happened...  

  • The school immediately dismissed all the class  students and warned them to keep silent...

  • School authorities had given her practically  no information about her son's death.  

  • Only that he hadfallen”.

  • According to Radio Free Asia, “Local  media mentioned the matter was highly  

  • sensitive in Chengdu, and all media  reporters were told not to speak up.”

  • Huh, that's not suspicious.

  • Then this photo began to  circulate on social media.  

  • It's Lin's mother holding a picture of  him outside the gates of the high school.

  • More people began to pay attention to her  sad story, wanting to know more details.  

  • And they watched how the school did  nothing to shed light on the situation.

  • His mother then posted, “Last night at 9 o'clock  the police station told us what happened...  

  • We learned that by the time the ambulance  had arrived at 8:30, my son had no heartbeat,  

  • and he was taken straight to the  funeral home instead of the hospital.”

  • The first thing we did was report this to the  police. The police said they would investigate...  

  • They showed me surveillance footage of that  day, except only the incident was not caught  

  • on camera... I read this kind of news many times  but never thought it would happen to me one day.”

  • How odd that the one time surveillance  footage would actually be helpful,  

  • it's not available. Normally, Chinese  citizens are under constant surveillance.

  • But the incident was getting  more and more public attention.

  • The next afternoon, authorities rushed to  release a public notice to address the incident.

  • It reads, “On May 9th at around 6:40 PM, a  student fell from the top floor corridor. The  

  • school immediately called the emergency numberBy the time an ambulance arrived to investigate,  

  • the student already had no pulse. The Public  Security Bureau has launched an investigation.  

  • The school expresses its deepest condolences.”

  • So...still no further details on how he died.

  • What's weird is, the nearest hospital  is less than 10 minutes from the school.

  • According to the mother's social media  post, the ambulance arrived at 8:30,  

  • just before she was notified about  the death at 9 o 'clock that evening.  

  • But that means the ambulance didn't arrive  until nearly two hours after Lin fell.

  • AndWhen asked about the two-hour delay in  telling Lin's parents of their son's death,  

  • the school's safety director Mi Ping said  that after finding the body at about 7pm,  

  • all of the form teachers were  called to help identify him  

  • but the process took a long time due  to the injuries he had suffered.”

  • And that just raised more  suspicion among the public.

  • With so many missing details, rumors began to  spread suggesting the student had been pushed  

  • off the building, or that teachers or students  had bullied him into taking his own life.  

  • Others began to question if authorities  were covering up something even worse.

  • Then early the next morning, the 'Chengdu Chenghua  

  • Education Branch' issued a statement on  Weiboattempting to dispel all the rumors.

  • Lin died from a high fall according to the  climbing traces, footprints and fingerprints  

  • at the scene. It was determined to bepersonal act, criminal cases were excluded,  

  • and no corporal punishment or insults to students  were found in the school...The student was not  

  • found to be bullied at school...The student  committed suicide due to personal problems.”

  • Yes. He killed himself, completely unpromptedeven  

  • though no students ever bullied him, and  school authorities never punished him.  

  • It just happens, people. And that's why  state media are not allowed to report on it.

  • Then state-run Xinhua said the reason there  was no surveillance footage is actually that  

  • “[Police officers] had taken away the recording  for investigation [as it was] key evidence.”

  • Yes, key evidence...of nothing  suspicious having happened.

  • State media also claimedLin's  father had watched the complete  

  • recording on Monday morning  in the company of a lawyer.”

  • Meanwhile, articles began  circulating on the Chinese internet,  

  • saying the issue had been resolved  between the school and Lin's parents,  

  • and they ultimately signed and  agreed to have the body cremated.

  • But, that might not be true. According  to Lin's parents. His mother said,

  • “I solemnly declare here that I do  not agree with the statement issued  

  • by Chenghua District this morning. There are many  questions about the content of their statement!  

  • I will continue to fight the police and the  school to give me the truth. I want to speak  

  • with my son's teachers, and I want to see all  the videos! I do not agree with this result.”

  • Which brings us back to the protestsStudents gathered at the school holding  

  • white flowers to mourn Lin Weiqi as they chanted,  

  • calling for the truth. And videos like this caused  more anger at the way authorities handled it.

  • But this protest seems to have brought too much  attentionwhich I'll explain after the break.

  • Welcome back. After this protest video went viral,  

  • authorities had a problem. Not just the problem  of how to handle Lin Weiqi's mysterious death, but  

  • also how to handle large numbers of young people  protesting, and spreading those videos online.

  • Their solution? Blame foreign forces and Hong Kong  pro-democracy groups for instigating the protests.

  • Some Chinese netizens were quick  to side with local authorities,  

  • and jump on thehostile  foreign forcesbandwagon.

  • Here are some examples:

  • Losers, quit the act. To think you flew all  the way from Guangdong and Hong Kong with your  

  • broken Mandarin speech and cameras, wearing  masks so no one will recognize who you are.  

  • You have some nerve to come  to Chengdu and make a scene.”

  • Yes, this guy thinks that Hong Kong  protesters flew to Chengdu tomake a scene.”

  • “I can't take it anymore! Open your eyes everyonedon't fall into the trap of the foreign forces!  

  • Notice how their chanting seems stagedNot to mention everyone was able to hold  

  • flowers and cameras, there was even a girl who  was assigned to cause a scene in the video!  

  • They obviously pushed the girl and  made it seem like the police's fault,  

  • when they were actually trying to save  her! It's too obvious, everybody WAKE UP!”

  • Yeah, wake up, sheeple! Don't you realize  communist authorities are the good guys?!

  • And then there's doxxing. This post  identifies a woman in the crowd,  

  • and claims she's a friend of someone  who worked at the local US consulate.  

  • The consulate that was closed down last year. And  somehow she made $300 million dollars from this?!

  • Wow, I wish hostile foreign forces would pay *me*  300 million dollars just to attend a protest.  

  • I've been funded by hostile foreign forces  for years, and they've never given me a cent!

  • Now you'd think posts like this would not get  much traction online, because they're too stupid.

  • And yet, the provincial cyber police  just doubled down on the message.

  • They wrote, “The peace and tranquility of  the motherland today are not easy to come by.  

  • Generations of revolutionary martyrs exchanged  their blood and lives for national independence,  

  • and generations of Chinese sons and daughters  have used their youth and sweat to fight for  

  • prosperity and strength. No one is allowed to  destroy it. We will never sit back and watch  

  • the damage to national security and development  interests. We will never allow hostile forces  

  • to undermine the security and stability of the  country and the peaceful life of the people.  

  • We will never allow the color revolutions to  occur on this land. Anyone who wants to carry  

  • out such a situation, try, you will be hit  head-on! #Vigilance Against Color Revolution

  • Yeah, hashtag vigilance  against color revolutionwhich  

  • no one was actually suggesting  was happening, except for you.

  • But if anyone knows how dangerous a revolution  can be, it's China's revolutionary martyrs  

  • who exchanged their blood and  lives for national independence.

  • And now it's time for me to  answer a question from you,  

  • a fan who supports the show through  the crowdfunding website, Patreon.

  • Lucien Furneaux says, “I am interested in knowing  more about 'gain of function' research and how the  

  • CCP had been using it in regards to Covid 19,  and how they are continuing to implement it.”

  • Good question, Lucien. The simple answer isthe Wuhan Institute of Virology was doing  

  • gain of function research on  coronaviruses before Covid-19 spread.  

  • According to one of their funding  proposals, “gain of function”  

  • meant scientists there were experimenting  to see if they could make coronaviruses  

  • more contagiousand then use this knowledge  in the future to help *stop* global pandemics.

  • Hindsight, of course, is 2020.

  • Thanks for your question.

  • But speaking of, there's more and more consensus  that the most likely origin of Covid-19  

  • was an accidental lab leak from Wuhan. So if  you'd like us to do an episode about this,  

  • leave your comments below, and we just might do  it for you. It will get demonetized by YouTube.  

  • Which is why your support  on Patreon is so important.  

  • Go to Patreon.com/ChinaUncensored  to learn more. The link is below.

  • I'm Chris Chappell. Thanks for watching.

A protest breaks out in China People demand the truth

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B1 US lin chengdu student police ambulance hostile

Chinese Police Cover Up A Mysterious Death

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    zijun su posted on 2021/05/24
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