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  • LORINA: Why I was hired for this job, it was my passion for it.

  • And it's not a secret.

  • So everybody on the team knows that in some way

  • I talked my way into this job because I was really,

  • really so obsessed with the product.

  • And I'm still-- every time I see Waymo,

  • I scream with excitement.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • JENNY: I will say that I feel like Waymo

  • is kind of like the most supportive place I've ever

  • been at.

  • Before I was at Waymo, I was doing my PhD

  • at Carnegie Mellon.

  • And just, like, most of my classes,

  • I was the girl in the room, or there

  • was some cases, three of us in, like, a 20-person classroom.

  • I know there's still a lot of issues.

  • But I just feel like there's much more support here.

  • DAPHNE: But you feel like you can improve because you feel

  • supported in order to make those change

  • and propose those changes, right?

  • So that's amazing position to be in actually.

  • Yeah, yeah.

  • ANDI: Yes, we're making huge strides,

  • but people's mentality doesn't even--

  • or some people don't think that we actually have a problem.

  • DAPHNE: There's two sides of it.

  • There's the in-the-room side where you're maybe outnumbered.

  • But then there is the other side where the actual system that

  • decides whomever moves up when, how you're judged, how you're

  • performing, kind of the system that judges people,

  • is made by the same kind of people still.

  • And I think until those "rules" are changed,

  • it might feel the same, even if theoretically you

  • would have 50-50%.

  • ANDI: The good news is we're changing it.

  • And because our leadership recognizes wow,

  • that's a problem.

  • And so we have this whole big push

  • for equity, inclusion, and diversity that's company-wide.

  • And it's not just on recruiters and sourcers

  • to have the onus to make our company more diverse.

  • It's going to be for everyone.

  • BECCA: We're slowly progressing where

  • it's like, yeah, a woman can lead a company,

  • a woman can do this.

  • Or I'm the first woman, I'm the first African-American woman

  • to do this.

  • It's still a progression.

  • So you're going to still see a lot of firsts.

  • And it's going to be a lot of mindset shifts to say, oh, wow,

  • they can do that.

  • DAPHNE: The more women are surrounding each other

  • with the positive mindset, I think it will really help us.

  • And as I mentioned, if the system will change over time,

  • yes, I think that will help a lot.

  • And also I think we learned how to deal with the system

  • very well over time.

  • So it's a combination.

  • I do think we'll get there.

  • JENNY: For the first year I was here I'm like,

  • why am I a software engineer?

  • I can't code.

  • This isn't what I do.

  • DAPHNE: But you play such an important role on your team,

  • right?

  • No, seriously.

  • You're like, a pretty prominent software engineer,

  • I would say, at Waymo.

  • That takes quite a lot of courage to say,

  • I'm afraid I don't have the right skills.

  • And I think we've all thought that.

  • But then speaking up about it and saying

  • that in front of your managers feels vulnerable.

  • ANDI: We're all on the same side.

  • We all have the same goal.

  • But sometimes it is hard to be--

  • you have to be that one person who

  • doesn't look like everyone else or doesn't

  • think like everyone else and still get them

  • to believe what I'm saying.

  • DAPHNE: But then I feel like some days you

  • really need unlimited limited level of confidence.

  • And I don't have it at some point.

  • You know what I mean?

  • Like, you really need some unlimited source of confidence.

  • LORINA: My team helps me a lot in this.

  • They tell me every day that we hired you for a reason.

  • And I think having a supportive environment

  • helps a lot with it.

  • BECCA: Like, with new women that join Waymo, or just people

  • that I meet in general, both men and women,

  • I always just want to provide a space

  • where people can feel like they can be themselves

  • and that they can come to me specifically, and tell me

  • what they need to tell me and not be judged, and just

  • feel like they can be their true selves.

  • JENNY: I try to mentor and support other women

  • on the team.

  • Daphne, you keep saying I'm senior.

  • I don't feel like I'm that senior,

  • but I do try and similarly set an example

  • and to support others.

  • I actively try and be as involved as I can

  • with recruiting and interviewing.

  • LORINA: It takes a lot of people and education

  • to actually tell girls that there are sources,

  • there are ways that they can achieve anything they want.

  • BECCA: I just really believe it's

  • about changing people's mindsets,

  • and then educating people so that they have awareness

  • of the issues themselves so that they can actually

  • contribute in a positive way.

  • DAPHNE: I come from an aerospace background.

  • And I think having worked in a very kind

  • of old procedural industry, where you just

  • follow a process--

  • and I've started challenging the status quo.

  • And in certain industries I have not

  • felt like I could be doing that, because things are there

  • for a reason.

  • But no one could explain me the reason, right?

  • And here, I feel like I can question.

  • Why are we doing the things we are doing this way?

  • So what I like is when people step up and take part

  • of the burden instead of saying, this

  • is what I would like to see, and then put their hands up.

  • I would love for everyone to be part of the solution, actually.

  • ANDI: I'm excited, because I feel

  • like we're on the cusp of a transformation that's

  • going to blow people's minds.

  • Because I just think self-driving cars

  • are going to be a game changer for so many people.

  • We're literally trying to find people to do things

  • no one has ever done before.

  • So it's having to do something brand new.

  • And then this is really cool and exciting.

  • But it takes the right type of person

  • with the right type of mentality to want

  • to come in and face challenges that they haven't seen before.

  • JENNY: Waymo has an opportunity to help here.

  • Like, you will have like a 2-ton vehicle surrounding you,

  • safely transporting you to your destination.

  • And I think we can do a lot to help.

  • DAPHNE: I think that's our role.

  • We can empower people to go places and do

  • the things they want to do.

  • LORINA: Positive experience for me.

  • It's important for me to work harder.

  • Like, I thought, well, I work at Waymo,

  • and I actually have some ability to solve this problem.

  • DAPHNE: And I think one of the things

  • I'm so passionate about when it comes to Waymo is you--

  • we're focused on the general public, on everybody.

  • And it's not a special product for a niche of the population

  • that has the money to afford it or lives in the right area,

  • right?

  • Like, preferably you want to be able to provide the safest

  • transport to absolutely everyone.

  • And that really motivates me for sure.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

LORINA: Why I was hired for this job, it was my passion for it.

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Driving Conversations: Women of Waymo

  • 9 2
    joey joey posted on 2021/05/24
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