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  • Whether you've gotten your knowledge about the Titanic

  • from the James Cameron film, or through the seemingly endless

  • series of documentaries, websites, and books

  • about the ill-fated ship, the harsh realities

  • of the lives and deaths of the 2,207 passengers and crew

  • tend to get lost in translation.

  • The 706 names on the Titanic survivor list

  • reveal the circumstances of those lucky men and women,

  • as well as those of the over 1,500 unfortunates who

  • never made it.

  • What were they like?

  • Where would you have been if you'd boarded the ship,

  • and would you have made it off?

  • Today we're exploring your chances

  • of surviving the Titanic.

  • But before we sink into that, be sure to subscribe,

  • turn on notifications, and let us

  • know what your favorite iceberg is named.

  • Now, to the Atlantic!

  • [DRAMATIC MUSIC]

  • To be a child traveling on the Titanic in first class

  • would have been a real treat.

  • Well, at least at the start of the journey.

  • Passengers in the first class came from the upper echelons

  • of society and enjoyed all of the luxuries

  • the ship had to offer.

  • Children aged 2 to 17 traveled not only with their families,

  • but with their private attendants.

  • And even their dogs, unfortunately

  • for the attendants and dogs.

  • First class accommodations varied,

  • but first class passengers could hit the gym,

  • play squash, go to the ship's library,

  • drink at one of the cafes, even sweat off

  • a few pounds in the sauna.

  • Children would have spent the trip

  • doing the usual kids stuff, playing games, exploring,

  • and, of course, running up and down

  • the Grand first class Staircase.

  • Your chances of surviving, 48% of children on the Titanic

  • survived the voyage.

  • But among the first class children,

  • their survivability rate was closer to 100%.

  • There were six first class children aboard,

  • and all were saved, although one source indicates

  • that there may have been one child from first class

  • who didn't make it off the ship.

  • Who you are, children in second class,

  • from 10-month-old Alden Gates Caldwell,

  • to 13-year-old Violet Madeline Mellinger,

  • were from middle class families and spent their time

  • aboard the Titanic in moderate surroundings.

  • The children of teachers, clergymen,

  • and other working professionals didn't have as much space

  • to run around, but were able to eat three-course meals

  • in relative style.

  • Second class passengers were given

  • accommodations that resembled first class

  • standards on other ships.

  • Children in second class were representative

  • of some of the diversity and social challenges facing

  • the middle class, however.

  • Michel Navratil kidnapped his two children

  • and smuggled them onto the Titanic, for example.

  • Joseph Laroche, the only black man aboard, his two children

  • and his expectant wife boarded the Titanic

  • after learning he would not be able to dine with his children

  • if they took a different ship.

  • Your chances of surviving, all of the children

  • in second class on the Titanic, 24 in total, survive.

  • The youngest boy was 7-month-old Viljo Unto Johannes Hamalainen.

  • And the youngest girl was 10-month-old Barbara Joyce

  • West.

  • Both Viljo and Barbara's mothers survived, as well.

  • But Barbara's father, Edwy Arthur West,

  • perished on the voyage.

  • Who you are, children in third class, a.k.a. steerage, a.k.a.

  • the broom closet, on the Titanic were from the lower classes

  • of society.

  • Children's tickets were around $15 each which equates

  • to around $387 in 2019 money.

  • The berths and other spaces available to children

  • in the third class were much less glamorous and far smaller

  • than those in first and second class.

  • Children played below deck with their siblings

  • and, in many instances, there were a lot

  • of siblings to choose from.

  • There were five Anderson children,

  • nine from the Sage family, and six Goodwin children aboard.

  • Others made games out of what they had available to them,

  • like Frankie Goldsmith, 9, who swung from cranes

  • in the baggage area.

  • Your chance of surviving, only 27

  • out of the 79 children in third class

  • survived the sinking of the Titanic.

  • The youngest survivor of the Titanic disaster

  • was from the third class, however.

  • Elizabeth Gladys Millvina Dean was only two months old

  • at the time of the sinking.

  • Who you are, all of the shiny perks

  • of being a woman in first class aboard the Titanic

  • would have been a bit overwhelming,

  • especially given how rarely womanhood

  • involved perks in those days.

  • Women from upper class families, like Madeline Talmadge Astor,

  • who had recently married millionaire John Jacob Astor

  • IV, and model and actress Dorothy Gibson,

  • enjoyed 10 to 14-course meals when

  • they weren't spending their time in tea gardens

  • and the library available to them.

  • Most women traveling in first class had attendants with them.

  • Maids, cooks, nurses for the kids,

  • which meant a fair number of lower class women

  • traveled with upper class echelons.

  • The fashion in first class distinguished elite women

  • from the rest of those on the ship.

  • Women donned hats and gloves during the day,

  • and at night they wore the finest evening

  • gowns of the time.

  • Your chance of surviving, women and children

  • first was true for the most part on the Titanic.

  • One of the only difficulties experienced by first class

  • women was the inability to get clear information

  • on what was really going on.

  • Goal one among crew members was to keep the first class

  • passengers as calm and comfortable as what

  • is possible on a sinking ship, which naturally

  • meant controlling the flow of information.

  • After the ship struck the iceberg,

  • John Jacob Astor went to see what was going on.

  • And, after receiving an update from the crew,

  • assured his wife it was nothing serious.

  • Madeline Astor did survive the sinking of the Titanic,

  • as did her unborn child and 90% of the women in first class.

  • In fact, only four of the 144 women in first class

  • on the Titanic perished.

  • Who you are, the women in second class, many of whom

  • were wives and daughters of the middle class

  • bankers, bureaucrats, and other professionals,

  • enjoyed bedrooms and dining rooms

  • decorated with mahogany, silk drapery, and ornate upholstery

  • on the Titanic.

  • These women included Mary Corey, who

  • was traveling back to the United States

  • from India, where her husband was working for the British.

  • Sylvia Caldwell was returning to the United States

  • to visit family after having spent time in Siam,

  • now Thailand, with her husband.

  • Several women in second class were traveling

  • alone or with friends.

  • Clear Annie Cameron, and her friend Nellie Wallcroft,

  • found themselves on the Titanic after their passage

  • aboard another ship had been interrupted by a coal strike.

  • Others were traveling under more clandestine circumstances.

  • Kate Phillips and her married boss Henry Morley,

  • for example, were having an affair.

  • Phillips was traveling under an alias, and it's believed she

  • and Morley conceived a child while on board.

  • Your chances of surviving, out of the 93 women in second class

  • aboard the Titanic, 80 survive.

  • The 86% survival rate indicates that women, again, were

  • given first go at lifeboats.

  • However, in total, only 42% of the passengers in second class

  • survived.

  • Who you are, many of the women in third class

  • aboard the Titanic were immigrants

  • headed to the United States in search of a better life.

  • Often married and bringing along large families

  • to meet up with husbands already in the United States,

  • women in steerage spent their time in boats

  • occupied by two to six people.

  • Women like Margaret Mannion weren't married, but rather

  • were on their way to reunite with siblings or other family

  • members that already made their way to America.

  • Stuck in cramped quarters while the rich folks swanned about