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  • Huawei's deep connections with China's military.

  • Indictments in GE Intellectual Property Theft.

  • And an arresting slap.

  • That and more on this week's China news headlines.

  • This is China Uncensored.

  • I'm Chris Chappell.

  • This week's China news headlines.

  • Huawei:

  • It's the Chinese telecom company

  • that wants you to know

  • it poses no security risk,

  • because it totally has no connection

  • to the Chinese Communist Party.

  • Well, it turns out,

  • Huawei may actually be partly funded

  • by the Chinese Communist Party's military.

  • A source speaking to the British newspaper the Times, said,

  • The CIA accused Huawei of receiving funding

  • from China's National Security Commission,

  • the People's Liberation Army

  • and a third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network.”

  • Okay.

  • Just because Huawei may be funded

  • by the Communist Party's state security apparatus,

  • doesn't mean you should be worried they're building

  • a backdoor into your phones or 5G networks,

  • so the Chinese military can sneak in.

  • It just might make you think twice about using Huawei equipment.

  • Huawei has of course denied all the accusations,

  • saying the company,

  • does not comment on unsubstantiated allegations

  • backed up by zero evidence from anonymous sources.”

  • But it really can't help that just last week,

  • this academic paper,

  • looking at publicly available records, concluded

  • Huawei may be deemed effectively state-owned.”

  • So how much control could the Communist Party

  • really have over Huawei?

  • Let's just say,

  • it's the Party's way,

  • or the Huawei.

  • Wait, no.

  • It's both.

  • They're the same way.

  • Two Chinese men have been indicted for stealing trade secrets

  • from the American conglomerate GE.

  • Now China will now know the secret to GE's success...

  • well maybe not.

  • One of the men is a former engineer at GE.

  • He was charged last August.

  • But the latest unsealed indictment gave more details,

  • that the alleged theft was conducted to benefit China,

  • and that the Chinese regime provided

  • 'financial and other support' to the Chinese companies

  • that received the stolen information.”

  • The two men are uncle and nephew.

  • It's a family affair.

  • Together, the pair are charged with stealing

  • electronic files of design models,

  • engineering drawings,

  • and other info about the company's gas and steam turbines.

  • Then, they allegedlycoordinated with Chinese government officials

  • to enter into research agreements

  • with Chinese state-owned institutions

  • to develop turbine technologies.”

  • That's basically a textbook case of how

  • the Chinese government steals American intellectual property

  • and then puts it in the hands of Chinese companies.

  • Turbine theft is big business for the Chinese Communist Party.

  • Not just gas and steam turbines, but wind, too.

  • Yes, Xi Jinping loves his windmills.

  • The Confucius Institute!

  • It's everyone's favorite tool of Chinese

  • state-backed soft power propaganda.

  • The Confucius Institute is a free Chinese language program

  • paid for by the Chinese state,

  • and set up in schools across America,

  • and around the world.

  • You'll learn useful Chinese phrases like,

  • Taiwan is part of China's sacred territory.

  • And you won't learn un-useful phrases like

  • Tiananmen Square Massacre.

  • And that's why it's so sad that Western Kentucky University

  • is getting rid of its Confucius Institute.

  • Now how will its students not learn about

  • the Tiananmen Square Massacre?!

  • The decision was made because of

  • US legislation created last year

  • barring any U.S. university from using Pentagon resources

  • for any program involving Confucius Institutes.”

  • Remember that CCTV reporter

  • who allegedly slapped a Conservative Party member

  • at a Hong Kong democracy event...in London?

  • Well, that CCTV reporter was charged with common assault,

  • but she didn't show up to her court date.

  • And now there's a warrant out for her arrest.

  • Which is quite a twist

  • since a few months ago,

  • the charges against her had been dropped,

  • because there wasn't enough evidence.

  • Wait, not enough evidence?

  • Well at some point, the investigation was opened again.

  • This does seem like a tough case.

  • Only a mind like Sherlock Holmes could sort it out.

  • Taiwan is working to create a blacklist of certain tech companies,

  • and ban them from building critical infrastructure

  • things like water and energy supply,

  • communications,

  • as well as government webcams,

  • servers, and computer software.

  • Of course this blacklist won't be dedicated

  • to any country in particular.

  • But I'm sure if there were say,

  • a hostile country to the north

  • that's repeatedly threatened to invade Taiwan,

  • and has tech companies known to work with that country's military,

  • then those tech companies might be targeted.

  • Speaking of the military,

  • what about all those elderly Chinese soldiers

  • who served their country?

  • Well, the higher-ups want to make sure Chinese veterans

  • don't “disturb social order”,

  • such as by asking for the retirement benefits they were promised.

  • Or by protesting when they don't get them.

  • Or by protesting about how the police beat up

  • the previous group of veterans for protesting.

  • That's why Chinese courts have imposedheavy sentences

  • on a group of veterans in eastern China.

  • 18 of them have been sentenced to

  • between 2 and 6 years in prison

  • fordisturbing the social order,”

  • intentional assault,”

  • orthe crime of preventing officials

  • from performing their duties.”

  • There's no way the Communist Party

  • going after its own soldiers

  • will ever come back to bite them.

  • And finally, think your student loan debts are bad?

  • At least you didn't borrow from a loan shark.

  • Probably.

  • Because one Chinese student

  • did borrow from from loan sharks.

  • He borrowed about 1,000 dollars,

  • and in a year,

  • it ballooned to almost 450 thousand dollars.

  • Graduates in China often struggle to make ends meet.

  • There's a lot of graduates,

  • but not a lot of jobs.

  • That makes loans hard to pay back.

  • Plus, a lot of these loan sharks

  • put on a good show of being legitimate lenders.

  • So for the first time ever,

  • I actually feel better about my student loan debt.

  • Slightly.

  • And that's it for this week's China news headlines.

  • Now it's time for me to answer a question from one of you

  • a fan who support China Uncensored

  • with a dollar or more per episode,

  • by contributing through Patreon.

  • Charles Walter Brooke asks,

  • Chris, what are the percentages of times

  • you are wearing dress pants vs just shorts, jeans, or whatever,

  • while you are filming the episodes?

  • Well, I hate to break it to you Charles,

  • but I actually do the whole show in the buff.

  • I feel more free that way.

  • This suit... is just CGI.

  • By the way,

  • thanks for filming the show Matt.

  • Matt: I hate this job.

  • And thank you to all my 50-Cent Army soldiers

  • who support China Uncensored.

  • It's only because of your support that we've been able

  • to cover topics that most other media don't want to,

  • because they prefer to get advertising dollars,

  • or make cars in Xinjiang,

  • rather than criticize the Chinese Communist Party.

  • Once again, I'm Chris Chappell.

  • See you next time.

Huawei's deep connections with China's military.

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CIA: Huawei Funded by Chinese Military | China Uncensored

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    zijun su posted on 2021/05/19
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