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  • Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo. With a population

  • of over 14 million, itís the largest French-speaking city in the world.

  • The streets are bustling with activity.

  • Many people take on multiple jobs to get by.

  • Among them are couriers, street-sweepers, maggot sellers, bread

  • sellers, and jewelers.

  • Each day they count their earnings, dreaming of becoming one of

  • Congoís super-rich.

  • Everyone in Congo dreams of getting rich. Thereís money if you

  • know where to find it.

  • But large parts of the population live below the poverty line.

  • Albert is a fisherman. He earns less than one euro seventy cents per day.

  • Just opposite from his poor neighborhood live some of Congoís

  • richest people.

  • Thatís ìLa CitÈ du FleuveThe rich live there. They do business deals,

  • we catch fish.

  • The residential complex is for Congoís new upper class, including

  • the countryís millionaires.

  • Uninvited guests arenít allowed in.

  • Fally Ipupa has the kind of life most Congolese can only dream of.

  • I never imagined Iíd have multiple cars. I just wanted to sing and

  • make a name for myself in Kinshasa and in Africa.

  • Fally Ipupa is the DRCís biggest star, and heís known internationally. He

  • is also a multi-millionaire.

  • ant a photo?

  • My God, I love you man!

  • I love you too.

  • Heís just invested more than 600,000 euros in a new home in ìLa

  • CitÈ du Fleuve

  • Are the doors open? Go on, open them!

  • I really like being here, especially on Sundays. I can relax here. Iíve

  • always liked coming to the river with my family, so I decided to put

  • down a few bricks.

  • Those ìfew bricksî amount to a Californian style villa, which stands

  • out here in the DRC, one of the worldís poorest countries in terms

  • of GDP per capita.

  • It doesnít have to be that way. With its abundance of mineral

  • resources, the DRC could be one of the richest countries in Africa.

  • Mining is the countryís most important industry. Many of Fallyís

  • neighbors have made a fortune selling raw materials to a resource-

  • hungry world.

  • Fally likes to relax away from the hustle and bustle of the city center.

  • The Congo River is one of the longest in the world. For the local

  • fishermen, itís also vital to their livelihood. They recognize the

  • singer immediately.

  • They say theyíre my brothers. Iíll give them something. Fifty bucks.

  • Fally gets one of the marina workers to hand out a few notes.

  • This is a lot! We called out to him, and he gave us fifty bucks to share

  • amongst ourselves.

  • Each fisherman just got the equivalent of about seven euros,

  • the amount theyíd earn in a whole week.

  • These people have different problems than we do. They even

  • work on Sundays. I often give them a little something, even if itís

  • just so they can take home a treat for their children. Iím happy to do it.

  • Fally Ipupa is one of about 600 millionaires in the Democratic

  • Republic of Congo.

  • The DRC is the largest country in Central Africa, about six times the

  • size of Germany. Itís home to nearly 100 million people. Its

  • history is one of conflict and exploitation. The ongoing violence

  • has resulted in six million deaths in the past couple decades.

  • In 1965, Mobutu Sese Seko came to power. Nicknamed the ìLeopard of

  • Zairehe ruled for nearly 32 years, embezzling the equivalent of more

  • than four billion euros during his reign.

  • In 1996 civil war broke out. Militias, supported by neighboring countries,

  • enlisted thousands of child soldiers as they attempted to seize the

  • countryís wealth. Mobutu died a year later in exile.

  • 2001 saw Joseph Kabila step into the political spotlight. During his 18

  • years in power, he amassed an estimated fortune of more than 13

  • billion euros. Because of its instability, the DRC is today

  • regarded as a failed state.

  • Weíre traveling across the Democratic Republic of Congo to

  • understand why some are getting richer and richer, while others are

  • struggling to survive.

  • In Kinshasa, the roads are unpaved and difficult to navigate.

  • Amid this chaos, a young woman named Moukembi is trying to build

  • a future.

  • Tell me what to do! The officers are supposed to direct traffic but

  • one of them says go to the left; the other one says go to the right.

  • What am I supposed to do?

  • Moukembi is in the middle of a test. In the back seat, Arnaud is

  • evaluating how well she navigates the traffic.

  • Sheís clearly feeling the pressure.

  • Youíll have to turn soon. You can tell you donít know your way

  • around here. Follow this car.

  • Moukembi has applied to be a driver at a taxi start-up. The

  • company was founded by a Congolese businesswoman who

  • wants to lift women out of poverty.

  • The pink cars are the serviceís trademark.

  • Previously, Moukembi worked as a nurse. If she passes the test, sheíll

  • triple her salary, earning around 250 euros per month.

  • I canít wait to start the job. Letís hope I pass the test.

  • Okay, back to the office.

  • Moukembi plays the part of a professional chauffeur until the

  • very end, but it will be a few days before

  • she finds out if sheís landed the job.

  • The cab companyís customers are middle and upper class.

  • To make the time spent in Kinshasaís traffic jams more

  • enjoyable, passengers are offered drinks, snacks, and even WiFi.

  • Weíre the first to offer this.

  • Patricia Nzolantima wants to give women better employment

  • opportunities. After completing her studies, she returned to Congo and

  • started this cab service with the help of investors. Today, she pays it

  • forward and supports other female entrepreneurs.

  • We want to have more millionaires. Congo has more than

  • 80 million residents, and weíre rich in natural resources. Itís time

  • for Congolese women to get a piece of that wealth.

  • Despite the instability in the country?

  • Give me two of those.

  • ?Patricia believes the economy will take off.

  • You canít reduce Congo to rape and wars. There are young people,

  • especially young women, who are trying to make real change. So itís

  • wrong to reduce the country to just the things that donít work.

  • This new generation will move the country forward.

  • Like Patricia and her friends, more and more Congolese people are

  • returning from abroad to work and invest in their homeland. These so-

  • called ìrepatsî live in secure areas

  • that offer a Western standard of living.

  • Back at La CitÈ du Fleuve, the high-end residential complex sitting

  • on a couple hundred hectares, two new residents are moving in.

  • Olivier and Naomie have just relocated from Johannesburg,

  • South Africa.

  • Most important for us was the washing machine. And the bed.

  • The couple works in finance. New job prospects convinced them to

  • return to their home country.

  • This will be the living room. The carpet can go here. There ? the

  • table, the TV.

  • This will be the bedroom.

  • The apartment also offers a great view of the Congo River. Olivier and

  • Naomie are newlyweds and want to start a family here.

  • The couple earns about 3,500 euros per month. Thatís more than 100

  • times the average salary. A third of it will go toward rent ? the steep

  • price of security.

  • You know, I want a place where my kids can play in the street and

  • they donít have to worry about 100 other people on the street,

  • and they donít have to worry about air pollution, noise pollution.

  • They can do their homework in peace. Itís also very much about

  • the environment, but also yes, it is a whole lot safer than the inner city.

  • A brand-new apartment, brand new furnishings. The next thing we

  • need is a brand-new baby!

  • The couple has found their safe haven.

  • Beginning of a new life for us. -Yes.

  • Thereís growing demand to live in this new residential complex.

  • Eventually, la CitÈ du Fleuve will have more than two thousand

  • homes? including singer Fally Ipupaís.

  • We meet him at an estate he rented to film his new music video.

  • The dancers are dressed as Congolese warriors.

  • The shoot is going well, until suddenly the music stops. Thereís

  • been a power outage in the area.

  • Thereís no electricity. Weíre trying to work it out.

  • Fally and his team are stuck.

  • Finally, a technician tracks down an emergency generator?

  • ?but that quickly breaks too.

  • Fally is frustrated, even though heís used to these sorts of challenges.

  • You see this tattoo? It means Iím Congolese. Iím not going to leave

  • my country just because of a few power outages.

  • Eventually, Fally Ipupaís assistant Manon

  • tries using the carís sound system.

  • We make do with what we have. Iíll connect my phone to the car for now.

  • It works, and the video shoot can continue.

  • In his twenty-year music career thus far, Fally has joined the club of

  • multi-millionaires. And the number of members is increasing.

  • The country is rich in minerals, including coltan, from which

  • tantalum is extracted. The metal is used

  • in the manufacture of mobile phones.

  • The mines are in the Great Lakes region, in the eastern part of the

  • country, near the Rwandan border.

  • Goma, the capital of North Kivu province, has been shaken by

  • bloody conflicts for more than two decades. Armed groups fight each

  • other for control of the mineral resources.

  • The UN has stationed 16,000 peacekeepers here, to shore up a