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  • Hi.

  • Welcome to engVid.

  • I'm Adam.

  • Today's lesson is a very special one, especially here in Canada because we're going to talk

  • about beer, one of our favourite drinks, one of our favourite pastimes.

  • In fact, it looks something like this.

  • This is a beer.

  • Not a Canadian beer, but that's okay, it's an import.

  • We're going to talk about the different types of beer, we're going to...

  • You're going to be drinking here when you come to visit us.

  • And beer is a very delicious, cold drink, made with a few particular ingredients.

  • It's alcoholic, so I know not everybody drinks it, but if you come to Canada it's a big part

  • of our culture; we drink it summer, winter, lunch, dinner, sometimes breakfast but not

  • usually.

  • It happens.

  • But there's a bunch of things you need to know if you're going to come to Canada and

  • talk about beer.

  • Of course, in Europe and other places in the world, very common as well.

  • So, first of all, we have a few nicknames for beer.

  • We could call it: "a brew", "a brewski", "suds", "a cold one", some people even call it "a

  • barley sandwich".

  • "Barley" is like a little grain, it's a cereal that you make beer with, so if anybody offers

  • you a barley sandwich, they are offering you a beer.

  • So, first let's talk about the process of making beer.

  • You begin with...

  • By making a "malt".

  • You take the barley, you put it in a container and let it "sprout".

  • So like little seeds come out and little strips of that come out.

  • And once you have those sprouts, you put them in a different container and let them "ferment".

  • In other words, you let the sugar content become alcohol.

  • Okay?

  • You..."Fermenting" is used with a lot of different things, but especially in beer.

  • Once the sprouts have fermented and the alcohol is there, then you add "hops".

  • "A hop" is a particular type of plant, very green, very bitter that you add, and you also

  • add "yeast".

  • "Yeast" is the same thing we put in bread, or in flour and water, in dough to make it rise.

  • Okay?

  • So we put it also in beer, that's why you have the white foam on top of the beer.

  • Okay?

  • And the hops and the yeast, they add the bitters and the flavours.

  • That's why your beer tastes a little bit bitter, depending on the type of beer.

  • Some of them are more sweet, some are less, we're going to talk about that after.

  • Okay, so next we need to think about the "alcohol content" or "alcohol by volume".

  • Now, there is such a thing as non-alcoholic beer, but it doesn't really taste that good.

  • They say it's supposed to taste the same as beer, but I'm not so sure.

  • I'll let you decide that yourself.

  • So, every time you get a bottle of beer it will say on it: "alcohol by volume" or "ABV".

  • Okay?

  • So, a lite beer-and we generally spell it "l-i-t-e", not "g-h"-is 4% usually, 4.5 maybe.

  • A regular beer is usually 5, 5.5, and a strong beer is 7 or higher.

  • And a strong beer will get you drunk pretty quick.

  • Okay?

  • And it's a very strong taste to it.

  • Now, how do we drink beer?

  • You can drink it from the bottle, you can drink it from a can, or you can drink it from

  • "a mug".

  • A mug is usually glass, it's usually pretty big and has a handle.

  • If you go to a pub or a bar here, they will keep it in the fridge, it's nice in cold,

  • they put the cold beer inside, you drink it, it's very delicious.

  • "A stein" looks like a mug, but generally it could be bigger, it could be different

  • sizes, different shapes.

  • It's usually very decorative.

  • It has, like, colours, or it has shapes, or it has emblems, all kinds of things on it.

  • You will see this especially at Oktoberfest which I'll talk about in a second.

  • Now, the size of your beer also makes a difference.

  • You can get "a pint" or "a half pint".

  • If you want to know measurements, that's 20 ounces or 568 millilitres, give or take.

  • So, a half pint is not usually half, it's usually about 12 ounces.

  • You can get a glass or you can get a full pint in a mug.

  • Now, if you're with a bunch of friends, you can just order "a pitcher".

  • A pitcher is usually about 3 or 4 almost pints I think.

  • And I think in Europe, three pints.

  • So about that.

  • In Europe I think you can buy by the litre, is usually the case, and that's more personal,

  • too; it's not to share with your friends.

  • Or you can go to the store, The Beer Store here or wherever you buy beer, and you can

  • buy "a 2-4".

  • A 2-4 is a case of 24 cans or bottles.

  • So here we just say: "Oh yeah, I'm just going to go to the store and pick up a 2-4."

  • If you say: "I'm getting a 2-4" to anybody in Canada, they understand you're going to

  • get beer, nothing else.

  • Okay?

  • Now, when you go to a pub and you want to sit in a pub or a bar and you want to drink

  • your beer, you have options of how to do that as well.

  • You can get a "draught" or a "draft", different spelling, same word.

  • This is the technically correct spelling, this is more the Americanized spelling of "draft".

  • Another way to say it is "on tap".

  • So, a tap is like the handle that the bartender will pull and the beer comes out of the tap.

  • Okay?

  • So if you go to a bar and you want to know what is available in draughts, you can ask

  • the bartender or the waitress or the waiter: "What do you have on tap?" and they will give

  • you a list of all the different beers that they have available for you.

  • Now, you can buy a bottle, you can buy a can.

  • A can is usually about 360 millilitres.

  • If you want to get the double-sized can, we call that "a tall boy".

  • A tall boy is just like a longer can because it's tall-right?-and thin.

  • Now, what are you going to do with your beer?

  • You can, you know, drink it slowly, have a little conversation, have some snacks, or

  • you can just "down" your beer, it means drink it fast.

  • If you "chug" your beer it means you drink it all in one shot. You don't stop.

  • You just lift the glass, drink, drink, drink until it's empty.

  • That's called "chug".

  • If you're in college you do this every day.

  • Once you grow up a little bit, no so much.

  • And "put away".

  • So: "Let's just go to the bar, we'll put away a couple of beers and we'll go on with our day".

  • "Put away" means just drink.

  • Okay?

  • It's just an expression to beer.

  • When all this is done, you will likely have a "buzz" if you have one beer.

  • If you have many beers you will be "drunk".

  • A buzz means you're just feeling, like: "Buzzzz", that's why it's called a buzz, right?

  • So it's a light drunkenness, but you will also probably start getting a little beer

  • belly, like right here, or a spare tire goes all the way around, that happens from beer.

  • So it's a little bit fattening, because again, the yeast and all the other sugars and stuff

  • in there, it's fattening but some people just drink it as a meal by itself, so it's not

  • too bad.

  • Now, like I said, in Canada beer is a very big part of our culture, so let's look at

  • a few of these things you need to keep in mind.

  • Okay, let's look at the types of beer you're going to be choosing from when you get to

  • your bar or pub.

  • First of all, you have "domestic", means made in the country you're in.

  • "Imported", brought in from outside.

  • So in Canada, Canadian beers are domestic, European beers or American beers are imported,

  • and then you have "premium".

  • Technically they're the ones you're just paying more for.

  • They're not necessarily better, they're just more expensive for whatever reason.

  • And then you have "craft beer" which are brewed in a particular way and they usually come

  • in different flavours, like fruit beer, chili beer, coffee beer, all kinds of different

  • combinations to get different types of flavours.

  • And then "microbrew", this...

  • A microbrew basically means...

  • Comes from the word "micro", which means small.

  • So it's not a huge beer company.

  • It's a very small company and they only make a certain amount of beer, and you can buy

  • that, and they very much specialize in particular flavours or particular hops, barley, water,

  • different things.

  • So, the different types of beer. Okay?

  • "Ale", there's "pale ale", "India pale ale", just regular ale.

  • These are...

  • Or "amber ale", I forgot to mention that one.

  • I'll write that here.

  • These are the darker beer... Beers.

  • They're a little bit sweeter, except for the India pale ale.

  • Now, I know that in Canada India pale is pretty bitter, but in England I think it's a little

  • bit sweeter, but in England they serve it at room temperature from what I understand.

  • In Canada only cold beers, we don't have any beers that are room temperature.

  • So, ale, darker.

  • "Lager", light.

  • Okay?

  • So, the most common type of beer you're going to have is a lager, and not "lagger", not

  • "lage-er", "lager", okay?

  • "Stout", that's a very dark beer, like black almost, like Guinness is considered a stout.

  • Okay?

  • And then you have "wheat beer", it looks a little bit white and cloudy.

  • It's made from wheat instead of barley.

  • It has a very distinct flavour as well.

  • Now, if you don't like beer but you still want to drink something alcoholic and that's

  • a little bit easy to digest, "cider".

  • This is made from apples.

  • So it's basically apple juice with alcohol.

  • Okay?

  • And there's all kinds of different flavours, all kinds of different brew techniques for

  • that as well.

  • Now, as I mentioned before, in Canada and I'm sure it's in lots of other countries as

  • well, beer plays a very important part...

  • Part in our culture, and especially the beer companies.

  • So the biggest company in Canada is called "Molson".

  • They bought the American company, "Coors", and now it's "Molson-Coors".

  • And if you go to any sporting event, any big sporting event, like professional leagues

  • in Canada, you will see advertisements for Molson basically everywhere or any of the

  • other beer companies.

  • So they spend a lot of money supporting sports especially, but sometimes arts, sometimes

  • events, summer events, all kinds of things are supported by the beer companies because

  • people like to buy beer, the beer companies give back to the community.

  • It's only fair.

  • For example, "Oktoberfest".

  • Now, this is a... Excuse me.

  • This is a German tradition, but in October you celebrate the harvest and you drink a

  • lot of beer.

  • So in some places all over the world they celebrate Oktoberfest with big tents and lots

  • of food, especially sausage and sauerkraut, things like that, and lots of different beers.

  • You're going to see huge beer steins, like those big mugs that I told you about, but

  • they're big, very fancy, very decorated.

  • Everybody gets together.

  • It's like a...

  • Just a nice day outside, drinking beer, eating food, listening to some polka, which I'm not

  • going to pretend to dance for you, but you can find that out.

  • And all these things basically make up a big part of the culture, especially in the summertime

  • if you go walk around the streets, you'll see all the restaurants and bars with patios,

  • people sitting down, having a beer, enjoying the sunshine, etc.

  • Now, before anything else, before I complete and finish this lesson, I have to be very

  • careful and I want you to listen very carefully: Don't drink and drive.

  • I have to say this because it's a very stupid thing to do.

  • Lots of people do it, lots of people get injured and die every year because of drunk drivers.

  • If you're going to drink, stay where you are, stay at a friend's house, take a taxi, take

  • a bus.

  • Whatever you do, do not get into a car and drive it.

  • Okay?

  • Enjoy your beer, stay there, find another way home.

  • Okay?

  • Now, also very important, if you have any questions about this, go to www.engvid.com.

  • You can...

  • There's a quiz there you can take, and there's also a forum you can ask your questions.

  • Subscribe to my YouTube channel.

  • And, of course, don't forget, cheers. Bye.

Hi.

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B1 beer drink ale canada barley alcohol

Real English: Talking about BEER

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    Summer posted on 2021/05/03
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