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  • Would you consider going back to having one job or having a traditional job?

  • Wow. At this moment of time I wouldn't consider to get back to where I used to be. I would like to be a slashie.

  • Would you consider returning to a regular full-time job?

  • Definitely not.

  • Not everybody can be a doctor, an astronaut and

  • a Navy Seal all rolled into one, but with the rise of the gig economy, and as more people

  • work from home, the traditional 9-5 job is no longer the only option.

  • Whether by choice or necessity, more people are now opting to take on side hustles.

  • I'm here in Hong Kong and I'm goint to find more about this phenomenon, also known as slashie culture.

  • So, what is a slashie?

  • A slashie is a person who chooses to develop multiple careers concurrently instead of focusing

  • on just one at a time.

  • This is also known as a portfolio career or diversified employment.

  • The term "slash" was coined by American author Marci Alboher, who wrote about people who

  • hadslashesbetween their multiple and concurrent job titles.

  • It describes a new mode of working that prioritizes work-life-balance and job satisfaction.

  • And while this may sound like a trendy new culture bubbling up amongst 20-somethings,

  • 44-year-old Gary Chung from Hong Kong is proof that it is age agnostic.

  • He's a Taekwondo instructor slash sports product sales trainer. That's after he quit his full-time job in 2014,

  • where he worked in finance and product management.

  • I decided to be a slashie because working in Hong Kong, the overtime work,

  • the intensity I couldn't stand it for quite a long time.

  • So I decided to jump out from a traditional job to be a slashie.

  • 31-year-old Hugo Ho is a former athlete who has two slashes to his name as a personal trainer,

  • social entrepreneur and financial planner.

  • I enjoy being a slashie because I can have my flexibility on the job choice, and I feel

  • so refreshed that I can have my time reset all day long and I can choose whatever I want

  • because this is the freedom I can have.

  • What potential risks are there in being a slashie?

  • Actually, holding different positions can also mean various failure at the same time.

  • So, make sure they have the preparation on their income, they may lose all their income.

  • But if they are passionate about one thing, I think they can handle the risk.

  • The stakes are higher for Gary, who is a father of two.

  • As a staff in a traditional company and traditional firms, I've got benefits like medical, insurance,

  • monthly based income, but as a slashie, I have to lose all this.

  • It's quite a big risk.

  • Can you tell me what is the biggest difference of being a slashie and holding a regular job?

  • What would be the biggest difference between the two?

  • I cannot tell one single main difference, but I'll say there will be a lot of differences.

  • First of all, as a slashie, I have to be disciplined because there is no boss, no management to

  • ask me to chase deadlines, and secondly, I really have to know my business inside out.

  • Because as a slashie, I'm mainly an army of one.

  • I've no colleague, I have to handle everything all by myself.

  • There is really no backup.

  • As the staff of a company, I always got backup right?

  • Does this mean that the slashie generation will be a jack of all trades and master of none?

  • Or does it improve their employability?

  • For many employers, old habits die hard, and their willingness to hire a slashie depends on the role.

  • Vicky Fan, CEO of professional services firm Mercer Hong Kong, has seen this first hand.

  • Having a resume or a CV that is from a slashie versus a number of other CVs where people

  • are available full time will just make the recruiter question whether or not that person

  • can commit and dedicate on a full-time basis.

  • So employers, in order to really use gig workers and slashies more fully, employers need to

  • look at jobs from a task and process base, an hour-base, time-base to output base.

  • The pandemic has forced employers to be more flexible with work arrangements.

  • More than 80% of firms globally said that they will implement flexible working at a

  • larger scale even after the pandemic.

  • But are employers willing to continue hiring slashies once things have settled down?

  • If the employer does not need employees on a full-time basis, so we spoke about certain

  • sectors that were harder hit, like retail and hospitality, if their need of that employer

  • is pulled back, there will be more openness to those roles or individuals in those

  • roles exploring other avenues of income.

  • But if you're in a, if you're in an organization where it's still working as pre-pandemic work levels,

  • we are not seeing employers opening up the options for their employees to look for other

  • part time jobs on top of that.

  • These jobs are not your traditional professions either.

  • From becoming an e-commerce seller to even podcasting, many people are in it for the

  • flexibility and the passion.

  • We can all see that it is a very prominent trend with the advance in information and

  • communication technology, people can easily seek different career opportunities at little cost.

  • But unlike those who make a living only because they have to, like doing as a casual workers,

  • slashie actually do it, have to choose their job, paid or unpaid because it's related to their

  • choice and their interest.

  • To me, it is not just changing angle to life, it is a lifestyle choice rather than changing

  • their jobs only.

  • Do you think that there's going to be more people that do what you do and this will become

  • a trend and slashie will become a trend around the world?

  • Yes, I do think so, especially.

  • Nowadays there is a lot of people who want to be a YouTuber, internet influencer and, like I said,

  • people are looking for work-life-balance a lot more than it used to be.

  • So, I do think that it will be a trend.

  • The slashie culture also plays well into another so-called millennial trait: FOMO,

  • or the Fear Of Missing Out.

  • While it allows slashies to commit to different passions, not everybody is cut out for it.

  • What kind of advice would you give to people that want to take on more than one job?

  • You've got to have some money, financially ready.

  • Because at first, I remember in 2014, once I quit my job to become a slashie, I think

  • I was earning only 1/3 of my salary, so that I've saved some money to feed myself and feed

  • my family during that period of time.

  • After one year, I was getting better.

  • You really have to know your business inside out.

  • Discipline is the key because you're the boss of your own, you contain your schedule, you work all by yourself.

  • While it is likely that the slashie work culture is set to stay, questions remain about how

  • sustainable it is in the long run.

Would you consider going back to having one job or having a traditional job?

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How the side hustle evolved into the slashie career | CNBC Reports

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    Summer posted on 2021/05/03
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