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  • There's something in the water

  • Lurking

  • And it's becoming a global threat

  • Welcome to China Uncensored, I'm Chris Chappell.

  • Behold, the greatest threat to  world peaceChinese fishermen.

  • That may sound like a joke, but the Chinese  Communist Party is using the country's fishermen  

  • for some truly sinister purposes. And the US is  now sending its Coast Guard to deal with it

  • But first, did you know YouTube has been  secretly unsubscribing people from the show?  

  • Make sure you're still subscribed. Hit  that like button because it's a big help  

  • with YouTube's algorithm. And help us  fight censorship with as little as a  

  • dollar an episode, over on the  crowd funding website patreon.

  • So you might be wondering, how are Chinese  fishermen such a global threat? Well,  

  • the Chinese Communist Party is great at  weaponizing any part of Chinese society.

  • One Chinese fisherman doesn't seem like  much of a threat. But when you have a  

  • fleet of thousands invading disputed watersthen you're talking about something different.

  • In just the first 6 months of 2020, more than 2500  

  • Chinese fishing boats were expelled  from Japanese territorial waters.

  • And it's not just Japan

  • It's happened in the Philippines.

  • And with Pacific Island nations  like Fiji, Kiribati, and Palau

  • In fact, according to this report by the  British Overseas Development Institute,

  • China's deep-water fishing fleet is “5–8  times larger than previous estimates”.

  • It's made up of about 12,000 ships  

  • that fish in other countries' waters. And  according to this Foreign Policy article...

  • China's fishing fleet is only one in the world  thathas a geopolitical mission, taking over  

  • weaker countries' waters and expanding  Beijing's maritime territorial ambitions.”

  • It's not just about asserting China's rather broad  territorial claims of the entire South China Sea

  • These Chinese fishing fleets plunder the  waters to feed China's massive population,  

  • while leaving very little for anyone else.

  • And this has a huge environmental impact as well.  

  • That's one of the reasons countries  around the world were so concerned  

  • when these Chinese fishing fleets spentmonth surrounding the Galapagos Islands

  • In fact, China's fishing fleetis  regularly implicated in overfishing,  

  • targeting of endangered shark speciesillegal intrusion of jurisdiction,  

  • false licensing and catch  documentation, and forced labour.”

  • Why aren't other countries doing something  about it? Well, because they risk the wrath of  

  • the Chinese military. These fishing fleets are  actually part of the Chinese Communist Party's  

  • military force at sea. It's what's called  the People's Armed Forces Maritime Militia.

  • These maritime militia ships are typically  civilian ships, often with crews of fishermen.

  • But like any civilian-owned company in China,  

  • these fishing crews have to answer to the  Chinese Communist Party when called upon.

  • I did a full episode about these guys called  China's Hidden Navy: The Maritime Militia

  • When called upon, the maritime  militia can make aggressive moves,  

  • like surrounding disputed watersor bumping or ramming other ships

  • And sometimes, these fishing vessels are  also shadowed by China's coast guard. So  

  • when hundreds ofcivilianfishing boats  enter your country's territorial waters,  

  • are you going to risk a confrontation  with the Chinese military?

  • Recently, China passed the Coast Guard Law.

  • According to the Lawfare blog, the law allows  the Chinese Coast Guard to “'use all necessary  

  • measures including weapons' when China's  'national sovereignty, sovereign rights,  

  • and jurisdiction are being illegally infringed by  foreign organizations and individuals at sea.'”

  • The US State Department criticized  it, sayingLanguage in the law,  

  • including text allowing the Coast Guard  to destroy other countries' economic  

  • structures and to use force in defending  China's maritime claims in disputed areas,  

  • strongly implies this law could be used to  intimidate the PRC's maritime neighbors.”

  • And so the US is doing something about it.  

  • And that means the US Coast Guard is being  deployed very far from home. More after the break.

  • Welcome back. Unless you didn't see  an ad because YouTube demonetized us.  

  • That's why we need your support on Patreon.

  • In early December, a US coast guard vessel  

  • was sailing in the waters of Palau. That's  about 6,600 miles from the US coast.

  • Ok, that's really stretching  the definition of *Coast* Guard.  

  • But the US sent its Coast Guard there forreason: to bust Chinese ships for illegal fishing.

  • It's part of a coordinated US effort  to counter China's fishing fleets

  • In 2019,  

  • a US Coast Guard ship even conducted a Freedom  of Navigation operation in the Taiwan Strait.

  • This began with the 2018 Trump  Administration's National Defense Strategy.  

  • According to a Senior Policy Analyst at the Rand  Corporation, “The biggest transition has been  

  • the Coast Guard's more overt signaling about its  role in the great power competition with China.”

  • The US Coast Guard is technically under  the Department of Homeland Security.  

  • But it's been working with  the Pentagon more and more

  • “U.S. government data show Coast Guard vessels  spent 326 days in support of the Department of  

  • Defense in 2019, compared with an average of just  50 to 100 days over the previous five years.”

  • All of the 2019 deployments  were in the Indo-Pacific.”

  • Part of the Coast Guard's work in the Indo-Pacific  is fairly mundane. Working with other countries,  

  • repairing ships, training crewsand replacing navigational buoys

  • But it's clear the ultimate  aim is to counter China

  • The Coast Guard is investing more  than $19 billion in at least eight  

  • national-security cutters, 25 offshore-patrol  cutters, and 58 fast-response cutters.”

  • “[These ships] are able to travel farther and  faster in worse conditions. They are armed  

  • with a naval gun system and heavy machine gunsand have decks on which helicopters can land.”

  • That sounds like they might be used for  a little more than search and rescue

  • And now it's time to answer a question  from a fan who supports China Uncensored  

  • on the crowd funding website Patreon.

  • Jacob Anthony asks, “Hey Chris can you dosegment over the current state of Falun Gong?  

  • I haven't heard anything about it in a while.”

  • Good question. In general, they are still  persecuted, still having their organs harvested.  

  • Although if you saw our recent podcast with  David Matas, who helped expose forced organ  

  • harvesting in China, that might be changingNot because the Chinese regime is slowing down,  

  • but because they might have just killed all  the eligible Falun Gong organdonors.” That's  

  • a big reason why Uyghurs are the new Falun  Gongat least in terms of organ harvesting.

  • But here's an interesting update. This is Peng  Bo. He was the deputy director of the 610 Office.  

  • That's the Gestapo-like secret police that's  spearheaded the persecution of Falun Gong

  • Well, he's the latest target of Xi  Jinping's anti-corruption campaign.

  • For those of you who don't know, Xi  Jinping's anti corruption campaign  

  • is really targeted at his political rivalsmostly tied to former Chinese leader Jiang Zemin.  

  • Jiang was the one who launched  the genocide of Falun Gong

  • And Xi Jinping really seems to have it in for the  610 office. Six former directors have been sacked.  

  • Zhou Yongkang, the highest ranking of  them, was sentenced to life in prison.

  • Does that make up for the fact the  Falun Gong organ bank has been depleted?  

  • Not really. In fact, this isn't exactly  justice. Peng Bo should be arrested for  

  • crimes against humanity. But the CCP won't  ever admit to any of their crimes. So it's  

  • always some charge of corruption or something  unrelated to the actual crimes committed.

  • But there's your update Jacob.

  • And thank you for watching. Once again  I'm Chris Chappell. See you next time.

There's something in the water

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Chinese Fishermen VS US Coast Guard?! | China's Maritime Militia

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    zijun su posted on 2021/05/03
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