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  • Vanessa: Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Are you ready to master the top 50 phrasal verbs?

  • Yes, let's do it.

  • Have you ever been listening to an English conversation but you just can't figure out

  • what they're saying?

  • You know the individual words, but the meaning just doesn't add up.

  • If you've been putting off learning phrasal verbs, you may want to check out today's lesson.

  • It will take you from huh to bring it on in no time.

  • So what are phrasal verbs?

  • Well, phrasal verbs are a two or three-part verb like this.

  • There is a normal verb try plus a second part.

  • That second part could be called a participle, could be called a preposition, it doesn't

  • really matter.

  • That second part is what makes this a phrasal verb.

  • To try is different than to try on or to try out.

  • These have different meanings.

  • So when we use phrasal verbs, it changes the meaning of the original verb.

  • Phrasal verbs are incredibly common in daily conversations, so I hope that these top 50

  • phrasal verbs in this lesson will help you to gain some confidence in your speaking but

  • also to help you understand what other people are saying.

  • Because it's important to know the nuances and the different meanings of these phrasal

  • verbs.

  • Let's get started with number one.

  • Number one is to add up, to add up.

  • Take a look at this sentence, her story didn't add up, I think she's lying.

  • What do you think this phrasal verb means?

  • Instead of me directly telling you right away the meaning of the phrasal verb, I want you

  • to guess based on the sentence.

  • That's what we're going to be doing for all 50 of these phrasal verbs.

  • It's kind of like a 50-question test, hopefully a fun test.

  • What do you think add up means here, her story didn't add up, I think she's lying.

  • This means it didn't make sense.

  • Something about it seemed not logical or strange, it didn't add up.

  • We usually use this phrasal verb in a negative sentence, so that's what's happening here.

  • Her story did not add up.

  • If you are a student and you go to your teacher and say, "I'm sorry, I don't have my homework

  • finished because last night I got into a car wreck, and I had to go visit my grandmother

  • in the hospital.

  • And then I had my dog, and my dog was eating my homework."

  • This story seems a little bit unbelievable, so the teacher might think, "Oh, your story

  • doesn't add up, I think you're lying.

  • You just didn't do your homework."

  • So here, the story doesn't make sense, it's not logical, it doesn't add up.

  • Let's go to number two, to back somebody up.

  • Take a look at this sentence, my parents backed me up when I decided to apply for graduate

  • school.

  • My parents backed me up, what do you think this means?

  • My back, backed me up.

  • We can imagine your back the part of your body, it gives you support.

  • You can't sit up or stand up or do much without your back.

  • So when you back someone up, you give them support.

  • My parents supported me when I decided to apply for graduate school.

  • This is a great example of how a phrasal verb can directly replace another maybe more textbook

  • word.

  • It's not wrong to say my parents supported me, but it's even better to say my parents

  • backed me up when I decided to apply for graduate school.

  • Phrasal verbs will just make you sound more comfortable and like you know what you're

  • saying.

  • Let's take a look at a similar expression, it's kind of a bonus tip that I'd like to

  • add.

  • What if I said to you I've got your back, I've got your back.

  • Can you guess what this means?

  • This isn't a phrasal verb, it's just a bonus phrase that is kind of similar to this phrasal

  • verb.

  • It means I will support you, I am supporting you all the way, I got your back.

  • We often use this when we want to give encouragement to someone.

  • So if your friend is maybe going to do something a little bit risky, you can say, "I will support

  • you no matter what, I got your back."

  • Great, wonderful phrase to use.

  • Let's go onto our next phrasal verb, to blow up.

  • Take a look at this sentence.

  • When I told her I couldn't come to her party, she blew up.

  • This is the past tense, this is an irregular past tense verb.

  • She blew up, do you think she is really happy?

  • No.

  • Instead, this is to become suddenly angry, she blew up.

  • So if this is part of your personality to easily blow up, maybe there's some deep breaths

  • you can take, clear your mind a bit.

  • If you are easily angry, well, maybe you easily blow up.

  • I need to calm down a bit.

  • All right.

  • Let's go to our next one, to bring on something, to bring on something.

  • 50 new phrasal verbs.

  • Yeah.

  • Bring it on.

  • Can you tell by my facial expression it's not like the previous one, I'm not blowing

  • up, I'm not angry?

  • Instead, I am excited about accepting some kind of challenge with confidence.

  • Yes, 50 new phrasal verbs, I can do it, bring it on.

  • We often use this to give encouragement to ourselves.

  • If you are faced with some kind of challenge and you want to really encourage yourself,

  • you could say, "All right.

  • Bring it on, I can do it."

  • To bring up, you shouldn't bring up politics in this house unless you're ready for a long

  • discussion.

  • You shouldn't bring up politics, this means you shouldn't mention politics in conversation

  • unless you want a long discussion because people here are quite passionate about politics.

  • To bring up something, what's something that you shouldn't bring up in your country?

  • What is a topic that you should maybe avoid in your country?

  • If you'd like to check out some common taboo questions in English and especially in the

  • US that you should avoid, check out this video that I made up here.

  • It will help you know which topics you shouldn't bring up unless you want to have a long discussion.

  • To call off.

  • Instead of calling off the wedding, the couple decided to elope.

  • Probably last year if you tried to get married in your country, it might have been a little

  • difficult because you couldn't have big weddings.

  • Very unfortunate for a lot of people who wanted to get married last year and probably continuing

  • this year too.

  • So what's your other choice?

  • Well, you could call off the wedding or you could elope.

  • What do you think this phrasal verb means, to call off the wedding?

  • It just means to cancel the wedding.

  • We're going to cancel the wedding.

  • Well, maybe you still want to get married, so you could elope.

  • If you watched one of my previous videos about 10 funny jokes in English, we talked about

  • this word elope.

  • It means to run away with your lover, to get married maybe in some court house or maybe

  • in a nice destination, but it's just the two of you, you are eloping.

  • So you could call off your wedding, you could cancel the wedding or you could elope.

  • To calm down.

  • When I have a stressful day, I like to calm down by taking a nice long walk outside.

  • Maybe you feel the same way.

  • When you take a long walk outside, it helps you to calm down.

  • This phrasal verb means to relax, to calm down.

  • To catch up, to catch up.

  • I met my friend for lunch to catch up because we haven't seen each other in a long time.

  • Am I running after my friend and catching her?

  • No, take a look at this other question.

  • Want to meet for coffee and catch up?

  • Want to meet for coffee and catch up?

  • We're not running, I'm not inviting you to have a race.

  • Instead, this means that you are meeting with someone who you haven't seen for a while.

  • You want to find out what has been happening in their life recently.

  • You want to catch up.

  • Sometimes we say catch up on what's happening in your life.

  • Yeah, I want to catch up on what's happening, so tell me all about it.

  • To catch up on.

  • To check in.

  • Look at this sentence, I went to the hotel to check in while my husband parked the car.

  • To check in, what am I doing in the hotel?

  • Check, check, check.

  • No, this just means that you're registering at a hotel.

  • You're telling them, "Hey, I'm here," and they write in the computer, "All right, Vanessa

  • is here, here's your keys."

  • This process is called checking in.

  • To check out.

  • To check out could have the opposite meaning.

  • When you leave the hotel, you check out.

  • You give them back the keys and you say, "I'm done, I'm leaving.

  • Thank you so much."

  • But I'd like to give you another meaning, what if you saw this sentence, I'm excited

  • to check out the new park in my city.

  • To check out the new park.

  • Or what if I just said check it out.

  • Oh, what do you think this means?

  • This means to see something or to try something.

  • I can't wait to see the new park in my city, I can't wait to check out the new park in

  • my city.

  • Walk all around, see what's going on.

  • Great, you're checking it out.

  • We sometimes use this phrase all by itself, check it out.

  • And this just means look at this.

  • Check it out, I can't believe that my son finished a 100-piece puzzle by himself.

  • Check it out, look at this.

  • It's kind of an expression of surprise and amazement.

  • Wow, check it out.

  • To chip in.

  • I couldn't go to the party, but I still wanted to chip in for a gift.

  • I want to help participate in something.

  • It might be with money or with your energy and time.

  • Take a look at this, my son likes to chip in and help me with the garden.

  • He's giving his time and energy digging and weeding and helping me with the garden.

  • He's not giving me money, he's not participating by giving money.

  • Instead, it's his time.

  • So if you can't go to a party but you want to help pay for a special present, you could

  • give some money to your friend and say, "Here's some money because I want to chip in for the

  • present."

  • And they will use that money to help pay for the present.

  • It's a great phrasal verb.

  • To close down, to close down.

  • This is different than to close.

  • Take a look at this.

  • Because of construction, they closed down two lanes of the highway.

  • They closed down two lanes of the highway.

  • Or during the pandemic, a lot of restaurants closed down.

  • Can you get the sense of this phrasal verb?

  • It means that they closed completely, sometimes forever.

  • So the highway, they completely closed two lanes because they were doing construction

  • or for the businesses they closed forever because of the pandemic.

  • It's a very unfortunate situation.

  • To come down with something.

  • I'm not feeling so well, I think I'm coming down with something.

  • Can you guess that this means to start to feel sick, to come down with something.

  • We use this for not serious sicknesses.

  • For example, maybe you have a cold, maybe you have a sore throat.

  • Maybe you even have the flu, but it's not something so serious.

  • You might use this as an excuse, "Sorry, I can't come to your party, I think I'm coming

  • down with something."

  • We often use something with this phrasal verb because at the beginning of a sickness, you

  • might not know what it is.

  • But you could say, "Sorry, I think I'm coming down with a cold."

  • You could be specific if you know or, "I think I'm coming down with the flu, I should stay

  • away from people for a few days.

  • To come down with some type of sickness.

  • And the opposite of this, to come down with, to come up with.

  • To come up with something, take a look at this sentence.

  • I need to come up with a great present for my mom's birthday.

  • Come up with a great present.

  • Am I picking up a great present?

  • No.

  • Take a look at this other sentence, I couldn't come up with anything special, so I just baked

  • a cake.

  • This means you're finding an idea.

  • To come up with a present means that I need to think about a great idea for a birthday

  • present, I can't come up with a great idea.

  • Or maybe you need to write a thesis paper, you need to come up with an original idea.

  • You need to find an idea that is original for your thesis paper, to come up with something.

  • To cut back on, to cut back on.

  • Take a look at this sentence.

  • I'm trying to cut back on fried food, but it's so tasty.

  • I'm trying to cut back on fried food.

  • Do you think I'm trying to eat more?

  • Nope.

  • Instead, that means you're trying to do less of something.

  • You're trying to take something out of your life, to cut back on your consumption of fried

  • food.

  • Or you could say it just by itself.

  • If someone says, "Why aren't you eating ice cream?"

  • You could say, "I'm trying to cut back."

  • You don't need to use on because you don't need to repeat I'm trying to cut back on ice

  • cream because they just said ice cream.

  • So we know the general topic and context here.

  • You could say ice cream again, I'm trying to cut back on ice cream, but you could just

  • say this by itself, I'm trying to cut back.

  • This is a really natural thing to say.

  • To cut off, to cut off.

  • Cut off my hair?

  • Nope, that's not what we're talking about.

  • Take a look at this.

  • The driver in the red car cut me off and almost caused a wreck.

  • Cut me off.

  • It's kind of an angering situation, you're driving, and another car comes in.

  • And you go, you slam on the brakes or you have to swerve to the side and be safe.

  • He has made it