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  • Tensions between Taiwan and China 

  • are at an all time high.

  • But Taiwan has extended an olive branch.

  • How'd that turn out?

  • Welcome to China Uncensored. I'm Chris Chappell.

  • Boy, tensions between China and Taiwan  have been getting really bad lately.

  • All of China's thinly veiled threats  after the US sold weapons to Taiwan.

  • All those Chinese warplanes flying over Taiwan.

  • I mean this is getting nuts. Even Japanese anime  celebrities can't escape China's campaign over  

  • Taiwan. Uhh, Shelley, are we playing mad libs  with the script? Oh, no, it's a real thing.

  • This has all been in the lead up to  Taiwan's National Day, which was October 10.  

  • National Day really upsets the Chinese  Communist Party, because it kind of gives  

  • the impression that Taiwan is its own  country with its own national holiday.

  • That's why the Chinese Communist Party does  things that look crazy to normal countries,  

  • like telling Indian media how to cover Taiwan's  National Day. By not calling Taiwan a country.

  • That kind of attitude leaves the  Party wide open to trolling

  • And India really delivered. Indian politicians  wished Taiwan a happy national day.

  • And Taiwan National Day started trending in India.

  • One local Indian politician put up a Happy  National Day sign outside the Chinese embassy.

  • And someone even commissioned  this Taiwan is not China cake.

  • Meanwhile the President of Taiwan  

  • Tsai Ing-wen tweeted her thanks to  all of Taiwan's dear friends in India.

  • And started talking about  her favorite Indian food.

  • So, the Chinese Communist Party  tried to control Indian media,  

  • leading to a national backlash in  India and an India-Taiwan lovefest.  

  • Once again, the Chinese Communist  Party scores! Against itself

  • Speaking of India, we just did an episode on our  other show, America Uncovered, about the Quad, an  

  • alliance to counter China. And India is a big part  of that. I'll put a link to that episode below

  • But back to Taiwan's National Day. In her  National Day speech, President Tsai extended  

  • an olive branch to the Communist Party. She  called for meaningful dialogue with China.

  • That's great! Authoritarian regimes always  respond well to talking things out. So  

  • what was China's response?

  • Well, just hours after her  speech, Chinese state-run CCTV  

  • aired this video of China's military  launching a simulated invasion of Taiwan.

  • Well, I guess that's a form of dialogue. But  perhaps they could make themselves clearer.

  • Taiwan denounced China for releasing a forced TV  confession of a Taiwanese businessman. The man has  

  • been missing in China for over a year due to his  support of Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement.”

  • Huh, so they've kidnapped a Taiwanese  citizen. But I think the Communist  

  • Party's actions could still really be open to  interpretation. Can they be a little clearer?

  • In its annual work report this  year, the Chinese government  

  • removed the word 'peaceful' from long-standing  references to 'reunification' with Taiwan.”

  • Okay, let me see if I can understand this dialogue  coming from communist China. They're saying:  

  • They are highly militarized, they  kidnap other countries' citizens,  

  • and they're planning invade a democratic  country to murder their people.

  • Okay, the message is crystal clearThere's only one way to take that.  

  • China's bond market is incredible! Buy buy buy!!!

  • But surely the Chinese Communist Party  can at least appreciate the effort  

  • by President Tsai Ing-wen  to deescalate the situation.

  • Recently Taiwan's Foreign Minister  told NPR that Taiwan would not  

  • seek formal ties with the US right now.

  • That's got to make the CCP happy. So surelythey're willing to back down a bit, right

  • Well, here's Hu Xijin the editor in chief  of my favorite Chinese state run media,  

  • the Global Times.

  • The change of tone indicated  the Tsai administration  

  • has fathomed the severity of a possible military  conflict with Beijing over its provocations.”

  • Hu added, “Beijing must not 'be fooled  into believing the gesture of goodwill  

  • of the ruling Democratic  Progressive Party of Taiwan'”  

  • and thatcontinued military muscle-flexing  is the only answer to cross-strait stability.”

  • So...if Taiwan makes a move like it's  going to seek formal ties with the US,  

  • China will threaten to invade. If Taiwan  backs down and says we can resolve things  

  • through dialogue, China will threaten to  invade. Well at least they have options.

  • And now it's time for me to  answer a question from one of you,  

  • who supports China Uncensored through  the crowdfunding website Patreon.

  • Ronny Ager-Wick asks, “Is there any way  that a country who has been tricked by  

  • China's debt trap diplomacy can get out of it  without paying? What would happen if they just  

  • stopped paying and defaulted on the loanCould they declare the "investment" illegal  

  • and thus reject China's demands? Or could  they have a revolution, a new constitution,  

  • and thus be regarded as a new countryleaving China to collect from the old regime?”

  • Ohh, great question. This in fact has happened.  

  • In Malaysia. Malaysia was hugely in debt to  China. To the tune of 34 billion dollars.

  • That was thanks to Najib Razak, who was  Malaysia's prime minister for nearly a decade.

  • Turns out he was very corrupt.

  • And a lot of that corruption had to do with  China. But before he got a 12 year jail term,  

  • he lost the 2018 election to  this guy, Mahathir Mohamad.

  • Part of his campaign was about standing up to  China, which gets more and more popular with time.

  • He was openly critical of  China's Belt and Road Initiative.

  • None of our people are employed  as workers. None of our companies  

  • are used for designing and planning and  supervising, et cetera. We gain nothing.” 

  •   And after being elected,  

  • he suspended four Chinese linked projects  worth about a total of 23 billion dollars.

  • That was worth about two-thirds of  all Malaysia's Belt and Road projects.

  • Mahathir then began renegotiating those deals.

  • And it seemed to work. Some of those belt and  road projects restarted in 2019 after hiccups.

  • It follow[ed] “a rare agreement to cut its  cost by nearly a third to about $11 billion

  • Great deal. Well, until those hiccups becamegasping death wheeze because of the coronavirus.

  • Thanks for your question Ronny

  • And if you'd like to have me respond to  your question or comment on the show for  

  • hundreds of thousands of people to hear, join  what I call the China Uncensored 50 Army...

  • and support us in the battle against the Chinese  Communist Party. You can join for as little as a  

  • dollar per episode on the crowd funding website  Patreon. You'll also get some other cool perks  

  • as well. Head over to Patreon.com/China  Uncensored to learn more. Link is below.

  • Once again, I'm Chris Chappell. See you next time.

Tensions between Taiwan and China 

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China Blows Up Taiwan’s Olive Branch | India Taiwan Lovefest!

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    zijun su posted on 2021/04/23
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