B1 Intermediate US 15018 Folder Collection
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JACOB SOBOROFF: Whoa.
Well that's just a balloon.
Come on.
MALE SPEAKER: All right, that was an easy one.
JACOB SOBOROFF: All right, balloon in the cup.
Oh, no.
MALE SPEAKER: What?
JACOB SOBOROFF: You didn't do that.
MALE SPEAKER: What're you doing?
I'm never going to look at anyone's pictures of their room the same anymore.
JACOB SOBOROFF: I'll tell you.
My assumptions, they were wrong.
MALE SPEAKER: Oh.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Guys, today we're talking about optical illusions.
And I know you think my eyes are huge but they're just normal.
MALE SPEAKER: What?
JACOB SOBOROFF: You might remember a few weeks ago,
we started the show off with the OK Go video, the new one that
is filled with optical illusions.
It took over three weeks to put together.
It is a beautiful thing.
That's what we're talking about today;
all about optical illusions, things that look one way but are actually another.
MALE SPEAKER: Who said that?
JACOB SOBOROFF: Who did?
MALE SPEAKER: We don't know.
JACOB SOBOROFF: That was a video called Assumptions
from a channel called Quirkology.
Got over 5 million views because nothing in that video is as it seems.
MALE SPEAKER: Oh.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Ladies and gentlemen, the Hyper-matrix.
Whoa.
Whoa.
Whoa.
MALE SPEAKER: Look at that.
That is--
JACOB SOBOROFF: It's wave in a wall.
MALE SPEAKER: What is happening?
JACOB SOBOROFF: What is happening?
And the reason it says Hyundai Motor Group is because this
is part of an art installation called Hyper-matrix.
And it's at the Hyundai Motor Group pavilion in Korea.
And this comes from a Seoul based artist
that the group has called jonpasang.
But there are thousands of motors
behind 300 by 300 millimeter cubes
that are going in and out.
The cubes are moving with the sounds,
but there's also projection mapping
on top of the cubes, which makes this full immersive experience like this,
like we're seeing right here.
That is not a real guy.
MALE SPEAKER: That's a Hadouken.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Hadouken.
MILES: We're talking optical illusions.
LIZZIE: Yup.
MILES: This is a really freaky one.
It'll make you feel like you're hallucinating.
If you have any kind of epilepsy or sensitivity to flashing lights, do not watch this.
LIZZIE: T-L.
No, you don't say the letters.
[LAUGHTER]
LIZZIE: O-F.
-You can look away now.
LIZZIE: No.
MILES: Don't look at me.
Don't look at me.
LIZZIE: You look fine.
MILES: That video is from the Science Forum channel.
This is obviously a popular video,
because it's got almost 13 million views.
That made things wavy, like everything was a heat wave.
It's created when your brain cells that are detecting motion just get fatigued.
So after your eyes look away, the cells
that are detecting the motion in the other direction
are more active.
LIZZIE: You sound like the substitute teacher
in physics class that got stuck explaining the hardest thing there is to explain.
MILES: I'm When I'm like a gym teacher.
LIZZIE: You know, like there's some cells.
And they're going to go over here.
OK, Miles.
We are going to watch the style of dance that
is called sock trousers dance, or strumpfhosentanz if you're
saying it in its native tongue.
MILES: Oh, "strumpfrozenhands," yeah.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Actually, it's "strufrozentonsils."
LIZZIE: See?
MILES: Wait.
Wait, wait, wait, wait.
It looks like the biggest conjoined twin ever.
LIZZIE: It looks horrifying.
MILES: Your brain so badly wants to connect the right arms
and legs to the right torso.
LIZZIE: But it doesn't work, and then you end up--
MILES: Just confused.
LIZZIE: 4.5 million views on this.
That means that 4.5 million other brains have also
failed to connect the right body parts and the right--
MILES: Yeah.
ALI: Earnest, did you ever play with sidewalk chalk
when you were growing up?
EARNEST: Of course I did.
ALI: This guy, Edgar Mueller, takes sidewalk chalk
to a whole thousand new levels.
[MUSIC PLAYING]
EARNEST: I like the people who are like posing on the side.
ALI: That's absolutely what I would be doing.
This particular artist's name is Edgar Mueller.
He's sort of very well known for his 3-D sidewalk art.
This particular piece was commissioned
as part of the Festival of World Culture that took place
in Dublin, Ireland in August, of 2008.
Since 1998, he has held the title
of Maestro Madonnari, which is Master Street Painter, which
is a title I didn't even know existed.
EARNEST: OK, what you're going to see is completely real.
There's no Hollywood magic.
There's no computer wizardry, no wizard computery.
What do we have here?
Just a couple of slopes.
ALI: Wait, but they just did that in reverse, right?
EARNEST: I said no Hollywood magic.
[MUSIC PLAYING]
ALI: What sorcery is this?
EARNEST: This was made by Koukichi Sugihara.
Your brain likes to take shortcuts, so it sees this,
and it thinks that it knows what it's looking at.
ALI: Yeah.
EARNEST: And it fills in the gaps for you.
It was the winner of the Illusion of the Year in 2010.
Sugihara-san, you are the best.
MALE SPEAKER: I know this is an optical illusion show,
but sometimes what you see can mess with what you hear.
We did feature this before on the show recently.
-Listen to Greg speaking.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Bar.
Bar.
Bar.
Bar.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Bar.
Bar.
-If you heard bar bar bar, you'd be right.
How about now?
-Bar.
Bar.
Bar.
-Chances are, you heard far far far this time,
except you didn't.
This is a perfect example of something called the McGurk
effect, which shows how our visuals can alter
what we believe we're hearing.
I'll play two tones, and you tell me
if they're ascending or descending.
[TONES PLAYING]
JACOB SOBOROFF: High, low.
[TONES PLAYING]
Low, high.
-If you compare with enough people,
you'll all have different answers.
It's an auditory illusion called the Tritone paradox.
It's created in such a way that the tones contain
both a higher and lower frequency in them,
but our brains have a preference of which to listen to.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Oh.
So our brains are different.
MALE SPEAKER: Yeah.
We have different brains.
What this episode taught me is that our brains are stupid.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Get with it brain.
Stop being so tricked.
MALE SPEAKER: What, you're going to let your eyes tell you
what to do?
JACOB SOBOROFF: So those are some of our favorite illusions.
Let us know some of your favorites in the comments.
MALE SPEAKER: We have some more optical illusions coming up for you after the show.
So stick around.
Check those out.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Now play us out Young Rival.
[MUSIC YOUNG RIVAL, BLACK IS GOOD]
JACOB SOBOROFF: I literally don't see anything.
MALE SPEAKER: You see nothing?
JACOB SOBOROFF: I see it.
I see it.
MALE SPEAKER: There you go.
You got it.
JACOB SOBOROFF: Now I'm locked into this.
The end.
It says the end.
MALE SPEAKER: Now you can see it.
So now [INAUDIBLE].
JACOB SOBOROFF: I feel like now I'm
scared to move my eyes back to normal.
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8 Optical Illusions to Freak Out Your Brain

15018 Folder Collection
Rosa published on August 5, 2014    Rosa translated    Rosa reviewed
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