Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • So let's imagine for a second that you're in a lovely English speaking country.

  • You're enjoying the early hours of the morning and you think it's the perfect time to go jogging.

  • You put on your workout gear, tie up your shoes and off you go into the distance while you're running, you're enjoying the fresh air and the fresh breeze and you think to yourself things can't get any better than this.

  • But, hey, they can get a lot worse.

  • All of a sudden, you take a misstep and you fall down into a muddy puddle.

  • Not only are you a total mess, but you've also twisted your ankle.

  • You can't put any weight onto it and think to yourself, Have I sprained my ankle?

  • Have I broken my ankle?

  • Oh, no, I can't walk.

  • What am I going to do?

  • So now you're faced with having to go to the hospital and you can't use your native language.

  • God forbid.

  • I hope that never happens to you.

  • If this kind of thing happens in your own country, you still have to explain what exactly happened to your doctor, right?

  • And I imagine trying to explain what happened in English might be a little intimidating.

  • So that's why, in this lesson, I'm gonna teach you some of the vocabulary you're going to need.

  • If you have to speak to a doctor in an English speaking country, I'm also going to teach you some general health related vocabulary.

  • True to our style will be doing this by watching different clips from TV shows and movies.

  • But before we get started, I want to tell you that we help you understand real life English without getting lost without missing the jokes and without subtitles.

  • Just our Zain, who says that our channel is helping him prepare for his Eilts exam.

  • So join Zain and take your English to the next level.

  • It's really simple.

  • All you need to do is hit that subscribe button and the bell down below.

  • So you don't miss any of our new lessons.

  • Yeah, so let's go back to your unfortunate jogging accident that led to an injury.

  • Do you remember what I said happened to your ankle?

  • A.

  • It's sprained, Be it twisted.

  • See it hurt?

  • I said, sprained.

  • Let's watch this example.

  • Okay, Why won't you just let me call for help?

  • Because you will call 911 and they will send a fire engine and a surgical team for a sprained ankle.

  • Just just help me up.

  • You can also say you twisted it.

  • However, this is a broader or more general verb.

  • You can twist your risk by turning it like this, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's a serious injury.

  • However, if you fall over, for example, and you twist it too much, then you'll be dealing with a more serious injury, which is called a sprained wrist.

  • A more general way to say this is that you hurt yourself or that you heard something mhm.

  • I think I really hurt my ankle.

  • I think I twisted it a quarter.

  • Are you ready for another quiz?

  • Let's continue focusing on that poor ankle here.

  • Okay?

  • How do you say you feel pain in a part of your body?

  • You'd say a it hurts be it hurts my ankle.

  • See?

  • It hurts me.

  • Yeah, Mhm.

  • Yeah, that's right.

  • A is correct.

  • Here.

  • For the most part, we use the simple present to say that you feel pain somewhere.

  • However, you can also use the present continuous with verbs that refer to physical feelings hurt ache or when you need to describe your injury.

  • The meaning, regardless of what tends to use, doesn't change.

  • For example, if you fall over at school, you go and see the nurse.

  • He or she might ask you where it hurts or where it's hurting.

  • You could reply my knees heading or my knee hurts.

  • The brain has a gating mechanism for pain, registers the most severe injury and blocks out the others Did it work?

  • My hand hurts like hell.

  • Now that we know how to say that, I think we're ready to take you to the hospital ride.

  • If you're in the UK once you walk into the hospital, look for the accident and emergency room.

  • If you're in the US, this is simply called the emergency room.

  • You might also hear or see this abbreviated to A and E mhm emergency room.

  • That way, do we really have to sit for hours in the emergency room?

  • They're just going to give you ice and Advil like last time in the emergency room.

  • You'll need to talk to the receptionist.

  • This is more or less how the conversation could go.

  • Hello.

  • Can I help you?

  • Yes, I've heard my ankle.

  • I can barely walk.

  • Or if it hurts a lot, you could say I think I've broken my ankle.

  • I think I need an X ray.

  • Can I have your name, please?

  • Here.

  • You give your name.

  • Okay.

  • Thank you.

  • Could you wait over there, please?

  • And someone will see you as soon as they can.

  • Great.

  • Thanks.

  • An X ray is an examination of a part of the body.

  • By taking and studying an X ray photograph, we gotta x ray.

  • Our patient's like, mhm.

  • When you get your ankle x rayed, you'll know whether you have a fracture, which is another word for a broken bone.

  • Or if it's just a sprain.

  • If you're lucky, it won't be anything more serious than swelling or a bruise.

  • So you'll be fine in a few days.

  • Order left forearm with the X rays bruising.

  • And Mom was right here.

  • I'm right here.

  • This process which starts with you talking to the doctor and then having some exams done, is called a diagnosis.

  • Do you know that it's almost exactly a year ago that I got my diagnosis.

  • Jesus.

  • Yeah, right.

  • Yeah.

  • Honestly, Never thought I'd make it this far, but the cancer and surgery do you want to learn how natives really speak?

  • Then you're gonna love our fluently friends Course in this 48 week course you're going to learn with the first two seasons of friends.

  • Every week you receive pdf power lessons, vocabulary, memorization, software, access to our fluency, circle, global community and so much more to get started today, simply click up here or down in the description below.

  • After the diagnosis comes the prescription.

  • Here, the doctor will write on a piece of paper the details of what medicine you need to take.

  • For example, the doctor could prescribe you painkillers.

  • As the name suggests, this is medicine for relieving pain.

  • However, if your injury isn't so bad, then the doctor could simply tell you to ice the area.

  • He said he wasn't getting as much sleep as he'd like.

  • Did you ever prescribe him any medication?

  • As I've always stated, I provided religious council, I understand, but I'm asking about medication Gun, 23 stitches.

  • Here's some painkillers.

  • If the accident turns out to be more serious than just a bruise, you could have a broken bone in which case you'd get a cast.

  • It's just the best birthday ever.

  • What?

  • I got a cast.

  • You like the guest?

  • I've always wanted one.

  • When you're at the hospital, you're going to be asked if you have insurance if you travel abroad.

  • Having insurance is important because if you have an accident and need medical treatment, the insurance will pay for your expenses.

  • However, if you get insurance, you should always take the policy and make sure they cover international accidents or else they won't pay for the treatment.

  • And you'll have to pay for everything, which could be super expensive.

  • If you will excuse me.

  • I've already talked to the insurance company, so there is nothing you can say that can stop me from doing this.

  • Now, Mr Korman, apparently, insurance company is not going to cover it.

  • Good day to you, sir.

  • If you do have insurance, you could be asked to fill out some forms, which means to add information to complete an official form or document.

  • We have to fill these out, describe illness or injury.

  • I dislocated my shoulder.

  • All right.

  • And how did the accident occur?

  • You already know that.

  • Let's now take a look at some words that describe how you feel when we're not in good health.

  • We say we're sick or ill.

  • They both more or less mean the same.

  • But sick is a bit more informal.

  • We can allocate these words with B, become feel, look full and get Let's look at some examples.

  • I'm sick and you're a doctor.

  • You have a duty to help me, Patricia.

  • It's been a real pleasure having you here at Sacred Heart, and I certainly hope the next time you fall ill, you'll remember us.

  • A very common way to say you're sick is through the expression under the weather.

  • I understand that Mr White is feeling a little under the weather this morning, so you folks are going to have to be making do with me today.

  • A similar expression is out of sorts, which means slightly unwell it.

  • What's the matter?

  • Nothing.

  • I'm sorry.

  • I'm just I'm out of sorts.

  • If you find English, expression is difficult to understand.

  • Then check out this lesson that Andrea made to watch it.

  • Next, simply click up here or down in the description.

  • Below the flu is a common infectious illness that causes a headache or a fever?

  • A rise in your body's temperature.

  • Now, let's try a little quiz.

  • Which one of the sentences below means he got sick with the flu?

  • A.

  • He spread the flu.

  • B, he came down with the flu.

  • See, he got a flu vaccine.

  • Mhm.

  • Yeah, that's right.

  • If you catch the flu, you could say you came down with it.

  • This is a very useful expression to talk about getting a certain illness.

  • Thank you all for coming in.

  • I have terrible slash.

  • Wonderful news.

  • Harmonium.

  • Angela has come down with mononucleosis.

  • Know she'd be okay.

  • Who knows a reason to pay the doctor a visit?

  • Meaning to have an appointment with the doctor is if you're suffering from some type of a quick like a stomachache, a backache, a headache, etcetera, every bone and every must move my body Eggs.

  • You've been feeling dizzy lately.

  • Like the room is spinning.

  • Maybe a little any muscle aches, fatigue, fever, headaches.

  • Well, now that you mention it, yes, Let's see these examples with different ways to describe the severity of the pain experienced.

  • Oh, I hate to be a bother, but my my legs really, really hurt was I stabbed in the leg, checked your legs.

  • We didn't find anything.

  • Yes.

  • Was it painful?

  • The gene therapy you couldn't possibly imagine?

  • Oh, good.

  • I'm glad to hear that.

  • Mhm.

  • Wow.

  • Oh, now, don't panic.

  • Are you in pain?

  • Oh, I was then a sharp pain.

  • This may have been the most exhausting day of my life.

  • My back is killing me.

  • No offense.

  • If the doctor recommends that you stay overnight for further examination, it means that you'll have to sleep at the hospital, where you'll be observed by the doctor and nurses in order to make sure it's nothing serious.

  • Well, we'll have to keep you overnight for observation, but your prognosis is very good.

  • Great.

  • This is similar to being hospitalized only.

  • We tend to use this verb when an accident happens, and it's often more urgent.

  • Maybe she injected herself with the Her behavior suggests Munchausen's.

  • She said four hospitalizations in the last four months.

  • Well, being hospitalized a lot certainly points to nothing being wrong with you.

  • In either case, when you get better, you get discharged from the hospital.

  • In other words, they allow you to leave.

  • Reflex is back to normal hearts looking good too.

  • I'll send in the nurse.

  • Get your transferred out of ICU.

  • You'll be discharged in the morning.

  • Thank God.

  • I just wanna get home.

  • Ah, yeah.

  • I hope you found this lesson both informative and fun.

  • We saw just a small fragment of all there is to learn.

  • When it comes to hospital English.

  • You're now better prepared to talk to a doctor about your experiences.

  • If you find yourself in an English speaking country, I recommend you continue feeding your curiosity by watching some of the shows were used as examples in this lesson, like house scrubs and Grey's anatomy.

  • Don't forget using your body can really help you get your message across.

  • In fact, I made a great lesson on how you can use body language to help you communicate your message to watch it.

  • Next, simply click up here or down in the description below.

  • And don't forget to subscribe to this channel and hit the button below.

  • So you don't miss any of our great lessons.

  • See you next time.

  • What's up, everyone?

  • Today's lesson is all about shopping, and it's going to be really useful for when you visit the shopping mall or generally when you're shopping or buying something, So in this lesson you will learn lots of expressions.

  • With the word shopping, you'll learn useful questions for when you go shopping, as well as words to describe low and high prices.

So let's imagine for a second that you're in a lovely English speaking country.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 ankle doctor insurance sprained hospital flu

Learn HOSPITAL ENGLISH VOCABULARY with TV SERIES | Fluent English to Speak to a Doctor

  • 2 1
    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/25
Video vocabulary