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  • Hmm-hmm-hmm.

  • Hey, E, I see you're measuring yourself for a new suit, and I notice you have the descriptive

  • words to tell you what you want.

  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • A lot of times in English we use shapes to describe things.

  • For most students, they have the classic shapes: Square, circle, and triangle; and I'm going

  • to today teach you a few other shapes that we use, which are sometimes a combination

  • of shapes that we can use to accurately describe real-world things.

  • Okay?

  • If you don't... if you don't know what I mean, give me a second; we're going to go to the

  • board and you'll find out.

  • Okay?

  • All right, so, E, you're going to get yourself a new suit, and it seems you have a cylindrical

  • body, and you're talking about your head is oval.

  • Well, I guess it is kind of egg-shaped, isn't it?

  • Okay, so let's look at the usual suspects: The square... sorry.

  • The circle, the square, and the triangle.

  • We talk about these shapes all the time.

  • Many students say, you know: "Teacher, it's like a square; it's like a circle", they don't

  • even use this one.

  • Sometimes we say this: "Round".

  • We use "round" to describe something that's circular.

  • Oops, I just told you one of the words you're going to learn, but you'll see what I mean.

  • And these are pretty good for describing the world, but the world we live in aren't nice,

  • complete shapes.

  • In fact, sometimes they're mixed, so I'm going to try to give you as much as I can.

  • And you see me looking around for objects I might be able to find in the real world

  • that you use every day that you can actually start going: "Wow, I can use my English and

  • it's actually... these strange words have real meaning."

  • So, let's look at the first one: A "cone".

  • Sorry, it's a circle with a triangle.

  • I did it again.

  • So, when you look here, you put these two together-okay?-and they form this weird kind

  • of, I don't know... you might say... sometimes you've seen in the old movies when they would

  • have, like, a megaphone: "Helllloo?"

  • Okay?

  • That's a cone-shaped.

  • When I was born, I had a cone shape.

  • They pulled me out, and my head was kind of like that.

  • It's embarrassing, but true.

  • Anyway, so, a cone.

  • I don't have anything for a cone, unfortunately.

  • But I know something all of you enjoy in the summertime.

  • Just take this, make it upside down.

  • And when you go for ice cream, you will say: "Can I have a blueberry ice cream, please?

  • And I want it on a cone", and they will give you a cone.

  • There, ice cream cone.

  • Didn't think I could do it, but there you go: Ice cream cone - that's the first one.

  • And, really, it is a circle with a triangle mixed together.

  • All right?

  • So let's look at the next one: "Semi-circle".

  • Well, if I'm from Jamaica, man, you know what I mean, because it's a patty.

  • A "patty" is a food in Jamaica, but a "semi-circle" is half a circle.

  • But I have a better one for you for that.

  • A lot of times when you have... because I do teach kids when I'm not here, and I want

  • them to sit down, I ask them to sit down in a semi-circle or a semi-circle, okay?

  • And it means they sit in a half-a-circle formation, so I can stand here and talk and then they

  • sit around me.

  • Right?

  • Because I don't want them behind me in a circular formation.

  • Another word for saying "semi-circle" is... to describe this, you would say: "semi-circular".

  • Semi-circular, that means half a circle.

  • So, a semi-circle is what it is, but it's a semi-circular shape; half of a circle.

  • Cool?

  • All right.

  • Want to go for the next one?

  • The next one I have something for you: A "cylinder".

  • Now, what is a "cylinder"?

  • Do you remember I told you?

  • In some cases what we have is things are mixed together in reality because you cannot get

  • just a square, and a triangular, or a circle shape.

  • A cylinder is: Take a square and pull it out, and then make it round, and you have a cylinder.

  • And I'm sure you're saying: "Okay, what are you talking about?

  • I don't understand."

  • This is a cylinder.

  • The marker is long and round.

  • And if that's not good enough for you, your bottles of water are cylinders.

  • We cut them off at the ends, but it's a cylinder.

  • And for those of you, like my French friends, you'll know a cylinder that makes you very

  • happy.

  • Yeah?

  • Yes.

  • Yeah?

  • Makes me happy, too.

  • So, the cylinder part is here.

  • You might even say this is a bit of a cone here, so we've got the two shapes together;

  • but really we're looking at the cylinder - it's round.

  • And that's why I said in many real-world objects we talk about, you would say: "But I wouldn't

  • say it's a cylinder."

  • And you're right, because you're going: "James, that's not really a cylinder."

  • I go: "It's not, but it is... it is cylindrical, like a cylinder."

  • You'll notice when we have the cylindrical and you go circular, they're descriptive,

  • so I'm giving you what it is - the shape.

  • But how would I use this in real life?

  • I wouldn't say: "This is a cylinder."

  • Because if someone told me this is a cylinder, I'd say they're wrong.

  • If they told me it's cylindrical, I'd go: "Yeah, it's round, it's long.

  • It's a square that's been pulled, and it's got circles; it's cylindrical."

  • Same with a marker - it's cylindrical.

  • Cool, right?

  • And now you sound very intelligent.

  • "Can you pass me that cylindrical wine bottle, not the square one?

  • No, no, no.

  • I don't want boxed wine; I want a bottle of wine.

  • Thank you."

  • Okay?

  • Cool.

  • So that's "cylindrical".

  • Now let's look at the other one.

  • "Egg shape".

  • You've seen this in life, and I don't have one, but you know what one is.

  • But what do we call it?

  • You can't...

  • well, you can say everything is egg shape, but that's so unsophisticated and I know you've

  • been one of our viewers for a while, so you want the... the good vocabulary.

  • Well, we would say this: "Oval".

  • And I've met many people who actually have oval heads.

  • Remember I said I had kind of a cone head?

  • Well, some people have oval heads, so the base is bigger than the top.

  • Right?

  • It's actually quite a pretty shape.

  • There's also "heart-shaped", and I'll give you that one.

  • And when they say: "Heart-shaped", it's like this, like a heart.

  • Okay.

  • Some people have heart-shaped heads.

  • They don't have two bumps, but you can say: "Heart-shaped" or "Oval-shaped", and this

  • can be descriptive for somebody's face.

  • Okay?

  • All right, so we're there.

  • Let's move on to the next one: "Sphere".

  • Well, a "sphere" is a round... round thing, like a full circle that's three-dimensional,

  • okay?

  • And you're probably thinking: "Besides the planet Earth, where is James going to get

  • a sphere for me to see?"

  • Dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dunh.

  • A sphere.

  • Three-dimensionals.

  • There's a circle, and a circle, and a circle goes in three dimensions.

  • Our planet is "spherical".

  • Notice I stopped saying the word "sphere" and I changed that word for "sphere" or "spherical"?

  • Because that's what it is.

  • To describe something, you say: "It's spherical."

  • Sorry.

  • There we go.

  • Spherical, meaning three-dimensional, round ball.

  • We could also use a simple word: "Round".

  • Right?

  • It's round, which doesn't mean just circle; it means it has to have some kind of volume

  • around it so you can see height, length, and depth.

  • Not bad, see?

  • Helps me... reminds me of my old math days, except now it makes sense to me.

  • [Laughs]

  • Okay, so we've got the long, round shape of the cylinder; we've got the round shape of

  • the sphere; we've got the egg shape or the oval; we've got the circle with the triangle

  • for the cone or remember my head-okay?-we've got the semi-circle and remember the kids

  • are sitting around it for half a circle.

  • So, these are all circular things.

  • What about the other ones?

  • Well, let's just step over here-right-and let's talk about things that have more of

  • a square shape to it.

  • Well: "Rectangle".

  • You know what a rectangle is, right?

  • This isn't just a rectangle; we'd say: "It's rectangular", because once again, the rectangle

  • is here.

  • But that doesn't describe this; it looks like a rectangle.

  • "Rectangular" we can talk about three dimensions.

  • It's a rectangular shape.

  • And we've added what we call a dimension or another side to it.

  • See that?

  • So, I put rectangle.

  • Let's me step over here so you can read it, and we're going to put... sorry, I'm having

  • a hard time writing over on that side.

  • "Rectangular".

  • So, it's an object that has two sides that are longer than the other two sides, but in

  • this case we're being rectangular, it also has other dimensions.

  • Cool?

  • All right.

  • Now we're getting somewhere.

  • Now: "Cube".

  • A "cube" is a three-dimensional box, so we see a box and a cube.

  • I wasn't able to get anything for cube.

  • I'm sorry.

  • I have Oxo cubes at home, but that doesn't quite count and you don't know what I'm talking

  • about.

  • But a cube is three-dimensional.

  • But we don't usually say: "It's a cube."

  • We might say: "It's"...

  • I know that's terribly scientific: "Something is cube-like".

  • Terribly, terribly scientific, but I'm sorry, that's how we say it because we're simple

  • and we'll go: "It's not a cube; it's cube-like" meaning it's like a square or a box that's

  • three-dimensional.

  • But sometimes when we say something is... doesn't really have a really good... oh, you

  • know, I could do this: This is cube-like.

  • See?

  • But it's missing a side, but it's still cube-like.

  • Right?

  • See?

  • Cube; cube-like.

  • But we could also say something is "boxy".

  • What?

  • Well, if you ask... if I asked my friend, if I go: "Mr. E, can you get that thing that's...?

  • That boxy thing over there?" he'd give me this.

  • And you go: "Why?"

  • It's because it looks like a box, it's a box, and a box happens to be usually cube-like

  • or a cube.

  • Sometimes we talk about cars are boxy or a sweater is boxy, so it has that kind of big

  • volume to it that's not really defined.

  • There we go.

  • And my last one, but not least, you're going to go: "What the flipping heck is that?"

  • Well, this is when we combine kind of a circle with kind of a square, we make it rectangle,

  • we elongate it, then we kind of put round edges on it.

  • And I'm sure you guys are going to go: "Okay, what is that?"

  • And I'll say: "Cigar shape" or "Hotdog shape", but I've got one better for you.

  • 90% of you guys have this... one of these in your pocket.

  • I'm going to say it's "oblong".

  • And you look, here: "oblong" as in long, and "ob", I don't know what "ob" means.

  • We might say optical, around; I'm making it up, so don't go: "Mr. E and James said oblong

  • is optical and long.

  • It's an eyeball."

  • No.

  • It's a freaking cell phone.

  • Cell phones are long and they have rounded edges; they're oblong.

  • You could say rectangular, but this isn't rectangle; it's rounded.

  • So, a lot of you guys have cell phones and they're actually oblongs.

  • So, it's oblong shape.

  • Yes, you have square ones; and some people do have really fat, square ones; and some

  • people have similar ones.

  • I also have something else that's oblong, here.

  • What did I pick up that was oblong that I put down?

  • This is another form of oblong.

  • See?

  • It's kind of got the rectangle, it's got the rounded edges.

  • This is a little funny on the end, but you get the point.

  • It's not just a rectangle; it has to have rounded edges.

  • So, these things are oblong, and these are everyday items

  • you use.

  • Okay, so these are items that you use all the time, and I've just showed you, like,

  • these weird words that probably people would say you don't use.

  • We do use them to describe things that we live with all the time, and now you will be

  • able to.

  • But, of course, learning something, and knowing something, and understanding something are

  • usually two different things.

  • So, you know what we have to do.

  • We're going to do our quiz, so I'm going to give you a second or two and click my magic

  • fingers, and you know what happens next: We take off and we go and do the other board.

  • Are you ready?

  • Let's go.

  • [Snaps]

  • So, now we've learned a few shapes or new shapes, why don't we put them to practice?

  • In