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  • Hello, everybody.

  • This is Elliot from E.

  • T.

  • J.

  • English.

  • And today we're talking about some expressions, but not the usual expressions we talk about on this channel.

  • These are going to be a little bit more formal.

  • So my previous videos about expressions have been really, really popular, especially one of the early videos I made about common British English expressions.

  • However, most of these were informal.

  • So today we're going to be focusing on some more formal expressions because loads of you have been requesting it.

  • So today's the day, so we're gonna go straight into it.

  • And, of course, I am a pronunciation teacher.

  • So when we are going to be talking about the pronunciation of some of these things as well, I think first impressions are the most important, which is why we're going to start with introductions.

  • So how do you introduce yourself formally many, many different ways?

  • I always recommend a handshake, whether you are male or female.

  • Handshakes are widely accepted here in the UK, and it's how we introduce ourselves.

  • People have their own different ways of greeting people.

  • Maybe that they first met.

  • Maybe it's for a business meeting or something uh, some people might just say hello or others might say good morning or good afternoon.

  • It's really up to you.

  • So let's just talk about the intonation with these words.

  • Hello?

  • Okay.

  • Hello?

  • Now what we're doing there is We are We have two syllables in the word.

  • Hello?

  • Hello.

  • Right.

  • What we want to do is to show that we're a friendly person by doing this mixture of a rising falling tone.

  • Hello.

  • And what that does is it just adds a friendliness to our voice.

  • A little bit of emotion shows that were a friendly, approachable person.

  • So practice taking that tone up.

  • Down, up, down.

  • Hello.

  • It really, really helps.

  • In England.

  • We really rely on Internation to show what kind of a person we are Really the same thing with Good morning.

  • Good morning.

  • Good morning.

  • We're just rising, rising, rising and then falling to show.

  • We finished.

  • Good morning myself.

  • I would say hello, Elliot.

  • Nice to meet you.

  • Okay.

  • Hello, Elliot.

  • Nice to meet you.

  • And all we do is show the hand for a shake.

  • When we introduce our name to show this is my name.

  • I'm a friendly person.

  • Nice to meet you going down.

  • Nice to meet you.

  • Or if you want to create the t sound.

  • Nice to meet you.

  • Meet you or nice to meet you.

  • So there are three different ways.

  • Meet you, meet you or meet you three different ways.

  • They are all British.

  • And then I would usually follow up with a nice friendly.

  • So how's your day been so far?

  • So how's your day been so far?

  • Now, if you've watched my videos about Internation, I have explained before that an open question we will usually use a falling tone.

  • So how's your day been so far?

  • Going down in another one of my expressions videos.

  • I talked about how we'd say all right to say hello to people informally right now This we would use a rising tone because it's a yes, no question.

  • Yes, I'm all right.

  • No, I'm not all right.

  • And that's how it works.

  • And now that we've spoken about greeting people, what about if we need to apologize to these people?

  • It's really difficult to sound friendly and formal at the same time when we're actually apologizing, right?

  • You could just say sorry.

  • Sorry, but I always find that the word sorry doesn't have enough.

  • Mm.

  • That's the only way to explain it.

  • So you need to kind of show how sorry you are.

  • If you've done something really bad, you've made a mistake.

  • Maybe it's your first day at work.

  • You need to show how sorry you are.

  • And if you need to be formal, let me tell you, I apologize for any inconvenience caused.

  • I apologize.

  • Apologize.

  • Starting with a nice, uh, sound that I apologize for.

  • Any inconvenience caused.

  • Meaning?

  • I'm sorry for any problem I may have caused.

  • You could even say I'm awfully sorry.

  • Now again, there are different ways of pronouncing the word awfully.

  • Some people will not pronounce the Schwab sound like I did just then.

  • And it would be awfully awfully.

  • Or you could say awfully.

  • I'm awfully sorry.

  • Entirely up to you.

  • Most people would say Awfully, awfully.

  • I'm awfully sorry.

  • Now, Internation, with this we want to stress the word that makes it bigger.

  • And that's awfully right.

  • So we need to give more power to that word to show how really sorry we are.

  • I'm awfully sorry.

  • And of course, falling tone at the end to show that we finished.

  • So let's just practice all flee Awfully and very important word.

  • Sorry.

  • Sorry.

  • Saw round shape with the mouth.

  • Sorry, because an American would say sorry.

  • We want the law to make us sound nice and British.

  • Now you can just say I'm really sorry or I'm so sorry.

  • Just remember to add more pressure into that.

  • Really?

  • Or so just to show that you really are.

  • I'm really sorry.

  • I'm so sorry.

  • Sometimes you might even just say my mistake.

  • I'm sorry.

  • So there's many different ways of doing it.

  • I would always say, if you're saying the word Sorry.

  • Add a few more words in the beginning to quantify how sorry you are about something.

  • How about if we need to request someone to do something for us?

  • Maybe you've just got a really good managerial job in an office.

  • And now you need to boss people around to tell them what to do.

  • Right?

  • Well, let's try and find some ways to say it politely.

  • I'm going to tell you about three really important words.

  • These are used so much in England, especially, Could you just I need someone to do some paperwork for me.

  • Could you just fill out this paperwork for me, please?

  • Could you just could just you becomes a weak form?

  • Yes.

  • Could you just fill out this paperwork for me, please?

  • And it's just making it sound really polite.

  • We don't want to sound rude, so we're just asking them if they could possibly just do this for us.

  • So remember those words?

  • Could you just and also for me?

  • So could you just do this for me?

  • For for me?

  • Please don't forget the police.

  • The reason we say for me is to say, this is a request from me to you formal.

  • Okay, We're being friendly now.

  • If we were being informal, we'd probably just say, Can you do this for me, please?

  • We can also say, Would you mind?

  • Would you mind filling out some paperwork for me again?

  • Finished with for me?

  • And please, could you possibly when we're asking someone to do something, especially when we're using the word could we're going to start quite high with our tone.

  • Could you just now my favorite one?

  • If you're really annoyed with someone I've told you in one of my previous videos, you could tell someone to piss off or tell someone that you are pissed off.

  • Oh, I'm so pissed off.

  • But that's very informal.

  • It's rude and it's very British.

  • We are quite rude people.

  • We can be at times, I mean, just look into our history were dreadful people.

  • But if you are annoyed and you want to express how annoyed you are, your frustration, then here are just a couple sentences that can help you sound formal.

  • When you do this, it's quite an inconvenience.

  • It's quite nice stress, quite an inconvenience.

  • It's quite an inconvenience that our system broke down yesterday.

  • It's quite an inconvenience, this one.

  • I use quite a lot.

  • I'm not particularly happy with it now.

  • This word.

  • Let's talk about the word, particularly.

  • There are different ways of pronouncing it.

  • When we're talking fast, most people will probably just say, particularly particularly, and that's just us being lazy.

  • It's us avoiding saying a long word, particularly.

  • But really you should be saying particularly particularly, and that just means well, I'm kind of annoyed.

  • I'm not very happy with this situation, so I'm not particularly happy with your course work.

  • I'm not particularly happy with your homework it could have been better.

  • And that's your lot.

  • It's only a few sentences, but it turns out that you can explain one sentence in so much detail, especially when it comes to pronunciation.

  • Now, if pronunciation is your thing, that thing you're focusing on, well, don't worry, because it's my thing, too.

  • And I have an online course, the links in the description box below, and it basically teaches you everything you need to have a perfectly clear, confident and British sounding accent.

  • You'll also have me on WhatsApp providing voice messages, and we kind of chat to each other, and I give you feedback and advice throughout.

  • So if you're interested, just go to the link below and you can join my online course anyway.

  • If not, I will see you in the next video.

  • As always, it's been a pleasure.

  • Thank you very much for watching Cheers, guys.

Hello, everybody.

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A2 formal tone apologize friendly sound good morning

Formal English Expressions + British Pronunciation and Intonation

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/20
Video vocabulary