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  • Hi everyone, I'm George, and today we're going to learn some food related idioms.

  • But before I begin, don't forget to like the video and to subscribe to the channel.

  • In this lesson, we're going to learn six food-related idioms, but before I tell you the definitions, see if you can guess what they mean by watching this video.

  • My invention is like a tablet, but you can actually feel the paper - It's that real.

  • I call it the Notebook 360 18543C1962.

  • In a nutshell, I think this will sell like hot cakes.

  • It's not really my cup of tea, I'm afraid.

  • Wait, watch the advert.

  • I need to write something down, but I don't have my tablet.

  • What shall I do?

  • Notebook 360.

  • The advert's a bit cheesy.

  • What do you know about business? Nothing!

  • I'm leaving, I've got bigger fish to fry.

  • You should take what he says with a pinch of salt.

  • I think it's a great idea.

  • Thanks.

  • So, that's the story, can you guess what the idioms mean?

  • The first idiom was 'in a nutshell'.

  • In a nutshell, I think this will sell like hotcakes.

  • And we use this when we try to use as few words as possible to say the main point about something.

  • For example, 'I once entered the Battle of the Bands at my school when I was 17.'

  • I won't tell you the whole story, but in a nutshell, we lost the Battle of the Bands because we were an awful band, essentially.

  • I think this will sell like hot cakes.

  • The next idiom is 'to sell like hot cakes', and we use this when something sells really quickly and in large numbers.

  • For example, 'these hats are selling like hot cakes.'

  • It's not really my cup of tea, I'm afraid.

  • The next idiom is 'it's not my cup of tea', and this is a very British way to say 'I don't like something'.

  • If you say, 'I don't like that', it can sound quite rude in some situations.

  • So, for example, in this situation someone might say, 'Did you hear Justin Bieber's latest song, It's amazing.'

  • 'I'm sorry, but Justin Bieber isn't really my cup of tea.'

  • The advert's a bit cheesy.

  • The next idiom is 'cheesy', and this is an adjective.

  • So, we use this when we want to describe something that's not very fashionable, and it's of low quality.

  • For example, 'This song's a bit cheesy', or 'I watched a really cheesy film last night.'

  • I'm leaving, I've got bigger fish to fry.

  • The next idiom is 'bigger fish to fry'.

  • So, if you've got bigger fish to fry, it means you've got something more important to do.

  • For example, did you see what Liam Gallagher posted on Twitter?

  • I've got bigger fish to fry than worry about Liam Gallagher's Twitter account.

  • You should take what he says with a pinch of salt.

  • I think it's a great idea.

  • The last idiom is 'to take something with a pinch of salt', and this means you shouldn't completely believe something because it's unlikely to be true.

  • For example, 'you should take what he says with a pinch of salt; he usually talks a lot of rubbish.'

  • That's all we have time for today, but before I finish, can you guess what this idiom means?

  • The first paper in the exam was a piece of cake.

  • If you want to learn more about idioms, check out English Idioms in Use in the description below.

  • And if you enjoyed this lesson don't forget to like the video and to subscribe to the channel.

Hi everyone, I'm George, and today we're going to learn some food related idioms.

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B1 US idiom cheesy fry pinch advert fish

6 food idioms in English

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    13 posted on 2021/03/17
Video vocabulary