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  • Hey there, Ronnie.

  • This is a piece of wood.

  • It's really nice for pretending to play baseball or mm, making shelf.

  • It's also a homophone.

  • Um, this piece of wood W 00 d is the exact same pronunciation as a modal verb.

  • W o U l d.

  • So it's very confusing because we want to say, world, what would you like to play baseball with me?

  • But actually, the pronunciation is the same as this would.

  • So you're going to learn some Homa phones.

  • And the really cool thing about this is you're going to learn about one of my favorite things in the world.

  • Trees, mhm.

  • Trees are amazing.

  • And you're gonna learn English and about trees in the same lesson.

  • The value of this lesson.

  • It's just outrageous.

  • Really, when you think about it.

  • So, um let's learn English with some trees.

  • One tree badly drawn.

  • I didn't draw this.

  • I don't know how to draw somebody else do this.

  • It wasn't me, okay?

  • And I definitely love trees a lot, and I do live in a tree, so this is actually my house, and these are the parts of my house.

  • The outside part of the bottom of the tree is called bark proof.

  • We'll get to that later.

  • The big by brown usually brown part of the bottom of the tree is called a trunk.

  • We have leaves, which is the plural of leaf.

  • Hold on.

  • Look at the spelling here.

  • This is crazy.

  • So in singular, we say leaf l e f But when we make it plural, we have to change the F to a V and add yes, And this is just really crazy that English does this.

  • People who made English before said so Let's spell it l e A f or other words kn if knife e k and I've But when we make it plural, let's just not put an e s or an E or an s.

  • Let's just change it and put a V e and then e and s as well.

  • So leaf becomes leaves and yeah, the spelling is a little bit mental, but, hey, we're learning English and there's a lot more.

  • Um, the large part of the tree that grows out of the trunk is called a branch.

  • The trunk is the base of it.

  • And then we have roots.

  • Roots are in under the grounds, and they stabilize the tree, sometimes routes.

  • You can see them on the ground.

  • You can flip over them.

  • I've done that.

  • I flipped over a route before, Um, when we cut the tree, who killed the tree?

  • We can get wood from it, as I showed you and, um, larger pieces before we actually cut it into slices.

  • It's called a log.

  • So the basic anatomy of a tree.

  • We have leafed leaf, branch trunk, the roots and the bark.

  • Now the cool thing about this is that when they were making English language or like, Well, let's let's have some fun with trees and let's take verbs and now sounds and give them the same word.

  • But let's let's make them completely different from a tree.

  • So they did this.

  • First of all, bark is a verb, and it's what dogs do.

  • No, I'm not sure if dogs have their own language, and it's interesting that dogs kind of understand other languages because my dog speaks English and understands Japanese, which I think is pretty cool.

  • But he barks.

  • So my dog barks that's less at everyone.

  • So bark is a verb, and this is what dogs speak.

  • Thanks for cats.

  • A Miao dogs bark.

  • Next one, we have a log.

  • So if you are a star track, not wars.

  • Okay, Star Trek Fan, You're going to know that in the narrative there's a captain's log Stargate 42 the captain's log is a journal.

  • So this is something for a boat captain could be on a spaceship because they exist or a boat and a log is basically a journal of their travels.

  • Now, the funny thing is, log is also slang for turd, and you can see by my picture I do this picture.

  • The deterrent is a piece of poo.

  • Okay, so it's usually a large piece of poo.

  • Maybe you go to the toilet like, Wow, who dropped the log in the toilet?

  • We're not talking about a piece of wood here.

  • This is a big poo or a big job e that someone has put in the toilet and it's funny.

  • Okay, um, let's go right to this one.

  • Would is also a homophone.

  • As I said, we have this word w o U l d.

  • And we try our hardest to say all of these letters world you like something.

  • But actually, you don't have to.

  • You can just say would as a model for Would you like hamburger?

  • Okay, would he's a homophone as a noun in slang Would means an erection for men.

  • Obviously, Um, we we more say morning wood so a man could wake up in the morning, say, Uh, morning would darling.

  • And this means that he has an erection, so would has very wonderful, wonderful consultations.

  • At the same time, another homophone we have is route in The singular is the homophone of the way that we take on a highway.

  • There's a very famous highway in America called Route 66 but the spelling without the S is exactly the same.

  • So r o U T e is the exact same as R 00 T.

  • Route also has its meeting of his own.

  • It's the bottom part of your teeth, which can make sense or bottom part of your tooth.

  • You might have to go to the dentist and have a root canal.

  • It's very expensive, okay, And a root canal means that there's a problem with the roots of your teeth.

  • So trees have roots, and so do our teeth root also means the source origin or basic cause of something.

  • So you might hear somebody say the root of all evil is money.

  • And you like but a tree roots.

  • Why?

  • It just has a different meaning.

  • Um, what is the root of your problem?

  • This means what?

  • Which hidden underground that we can't see that's causing this problem.

  • So this is a kind of a fun word.

  • Um, a trunk is the back storage compartment of a car.

  • Now, when I was writing this as a this seems very, very formal to call it a storage compartment.

  • But it is.

  • So if you've got some crap you've opened up, you put it in trunk.

  • You close it, you're done famous for dead bodies.

  • That's where you put them.

  • You don't put them in the front seat because then you'll see Stick them in the trunk.

  • Interestingly enough to in the UK, they don't call it a trunk.

  • They call it a boot and trees don't have boots.

  • So we're not going there.

  • Hold on.

  • People from the UK we'll do that in the next lesson.

  • Um, branch is a local office of a larger corporation.

  • So if we have a wonderful corporation called in vid dot com.

  • Wonderful, By the way, if you've never seen it, e n g v i d dot com.

  • Okay, um, we can say the Toronto branch of England, and you think that's a tree, But but you can think of it like the trunk is the main part and the branch of the other offices that emanate from the one mean corporation that will work.

  • And this is always fun leaf, So the leaf is a noun.

  • It's a beautiful green or blue or red thing that grows off of a tree, and we can use this as a verb.

  • And if you read the sentence I leave through magazines.

  • Do you remember magazines when you went to the doctor's office or the dentist's office?

  • There are these wonderful pieces of pictures and glossy things you don't need, and you could You can look at them and leaf through them.

  • So if you leaf through a book, it means that you kind of don't actually read it.

  • Look at it and pretend to read it.

  • Make sure it's not upside down because that's a dead giveaway that you're not actually reading.

  • something.

  • But if you leave through something, it means you look at it quickly.

  • It's in my notebook.

  • Okay.

  • Magazines are done now because everyone just stares at their phones.

  • But you're staring at your phone now watching this keep on concentrated.

  • Do not pick up that magazine that does not exist.

  • Um, so we can leave through magazine and we can put a leaf in, not on, but a leaf in the table because we need a bigger table.

  • Let me explain.

  • Growing up, I had a family, we had dinner and we ate dinner at a table.

  • I know that's shocking, but it's true.

  • And we had four people.

  • We sat around the table eight.

  • That was fun.

  • Sometimes other people would come to our house, and the table wasn't big enough for our guests.

  • So we had to expand the table, pulled one side, pull the other side, and then we put this other piece of wood in the middle.

  • Voila.

  • We have a bigger table, this piece of wood that extended the table.

  • Guess what it's called.

  • It's called a leaf.

  • So my parents would say, Okay, put the Leafs in the table.

  • We need a bigger table, so it's an extension of the table.

  • Be careful with your prepositions at this point.

  • If they said Hey, Ronnie, can you put the leaf on the table?

  • I would have to go to the tree outside and get a leaf and put it on the surface or on top of it.

  • So be careful with prepositions.

  • If you have to put the leaf in the table, you're extending the table.

  • But if you put something on like the book, it's going to be on top of something on the surface of it.

  • So I really love this one.

  • This one's fun because it helps you remember two things.

  • First of all, leaves this crazy spelling, and it really is going to help you remember this verb.

  • So in the present tense, we have I leave tomorrow.

  • But remember, if we have he she or it, you have to make it plural with an S.

  • So you have to say he leaves tomorrow.

  • Look at that.

  • That's the same word.

  • So the leaf leaves.

  • Tomorrow it's going to drop.

  • You can now make as many wonderful jokes about leaving and leaves and trees as you would like, but Let me leave you with my personal favorite from grade three.

  • I'm going to make like, a tree and leave.

Hey there, Ronnie.

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A2 leaf tree table trunk log wood

Learn English Vocabulary...with a tree!

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/09
Video vocabulary