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  • Uh huh.

  • Capitola origin Hold.

  • Of course, Obadiah.

  • Hi.

  • James McDivitt.

  • I'm not Russian.

  • I'm just practicing it.

  • Uh, I was thinking about traveling.

  • Maybe Ecuador, perhaps of Russia.

  • Beautiful ladies there.

  • Um And when I thought about it, I mean, let's face it, nobody wants to be stuck in one place, right?

  • For your whole life.

  • You're an international person trying to learn an international language, which is English, and you know you.

  • Hey, you know what?

  • Let's do idioms on the face.

  • I said, let's face it, I'm gonna talk to Mr E, and we'll get the lesson started.

  • Okay.

  • Idioms of the face.

  • Face, face, face.

  • Take that, Madonna.

  • All right, so what do we got?

  • E?

  • All right, well, we talked about let's face it, But we'll come back to that in case you're wondering what that is.

  • And let's start with number one.

  • And where is number one to Ah, the news.

  • Let the nose.

  • What about the knows?

  • Well, the nose you bring in air, you bring things yourself, the stuff of life, right?

  • So if you know something which is good, which is air, I find air to be very, very good in fact necessary, you might say, Want this?

  • You're going to have a nose for value.

  • Why?

  • Oxygen is necessary for life where you die and when we say someone has a nose for value, it means they know what the good stuff is.

  • They know what is good, and they know what is valuable.

  • So if you have a nose for value, you know, a good deal, a good bargain or you know something good when you see it, right?

  • All right, here's the other thing.

  • Remember?

  • I said breathing.

  • By the way, you like this?

  • I look good today.

  • Yeah.

  • Anyway, back to work.

  • Pay through the nose.

  • Oxygen is the stuff of life.

  • If you don't breathe, you die.

  • So sometimes we talk about paying through the nose.

  • When something is too expensive, you pay too much for it.

  • Yes, oxygen is important, but I also need my blood and my heart and my brain.

  • So we say to pay through the nose is to pay too much for something or pay.

  • Very pay a lot of money for something you don't really want to pay through the nose.

  • That's an expensive way to pay.

  • Okay, so we did knows what's the next one we're gonna do?

  • He is a man of little brain.

  • That's a brain, in case you don't know what that is, or the brain is the physical part.

  • That's the thing they can put their head in and take out of you.

  • But we usually say, I think in my mind my mind, my mind is where my ideas come from.

  • Okay, so when we say something like this a lot on her mind, it means you're thinking a lot about things.

  • I have a lot of my mind.

  • I'm going to give you a three idiom free.

  • Okay, This one is a lot on my plate, which is a lot to do, but that's another one.

  • So a lot on my mind means I have a lot of thoughts going in my head.

  • Okay, so it's not quite the face or the head, but look, it's inside your head.

  • Your faces here.

  • Your brain is here.

  • So if you have a lot on your mind means you have a lot to think about, right?

  • You gotta make dinner.

  • You gotta study at Ingrid.

  • I mean, you're a very busy person, and I'm impressed by you.

  • All right.

  • Next four.

  • Golf term.

  • Have you ever Okay, I'm trying to remember this all on a second.

  • Have you ever tried to remember something?

  • And it's just not there, But you can almost see it in your head, but it's it won't come out of your mouth.

  • It's right.

  • Well, this is called the tip.

  • Uh huh.

  • On the marker is the tip.

  • The tip is the top.

  • When we say some things on the tip of your tongue, it means it's almost there.

  • You can almost remember it, but it just won't come out right.

  • Try not to think of something else that anyway.

  • So it's on the tip of your tongue.

  • It's just Ah, it's on the tip of my tongue with a boat move.

  • All right.

  • Okay.

  • Cool.

  • You like that?

  • So when someone says what's his name?

  • His name is, uh is Mr Mr A.

  • Mr B.

  • Mr.

  • C.

  • Mr.

  • Dean is right there on the tip of my tongue.

  • I wish I could say there got it on the tip of your tongue.

  • So I'm sure some of you right now are a little bit perturbed.

  • Perturbations bothered or upset because I'm making all these funny faces.

  • And you might think I'm being a little bit, I don't know, a little obnoxious, which means rude, you know, just a little bit.

  • My lips are moving when you think somebody is being rude to you or they're talking.

  • Hey, don't get lippy, man.

  • Don't get lippy.

  • I hear you.

  • If you get lippy, lippy means because your lips are moving.

  • You're talking too much.

  • You're being a little bit rude.

  • Excuse me.

  • Usually when we say this one to do do lippy L I p p Wide Children get lippy, your boyfriend or girlfriend might get lippy, and you give them the business hand of your business later.

  • Your hand.

  • Okay?

  • Don't make me use the business side.

  • You can get lippy like that.

  • It's gonna be business.

  • And no, I don't abuse people or pets.

  • It's just a joke.

  • All right, so, lippy, it's an old one, but a good one now, 56 My dad would say that one.

  • Number six, Notice the head.

  • This is This is your face eyes, nose, mouth.

  • But they're on your head when you're walking your head moves along with you.

  • And as long as your head is moving.

  • Okay?

  • My head still moving?

  • Okay.

  • If I was indeed, I would be doing this.

  • My head's moving.

  • Okay.

  • I'm making headway.

  • Headway means your head.

  • Bobby hails.

  • I went to school with a guy named Bobby Hails.

  • He really walk like this.

  • He knew he was going forward.

  • Kept moving anyway, when you make headway, it means you make progress.

  • If I say to you, Did you make any headway on that project?

  • I mean, did you make any progress?

  • Are you moving forward because the head must go forward?

  • Yeah.

  • So make there.

  • We go ahead.

  • Headway.

  • Alright.

  • It seems like we're almost done.

  • We've come a complete circle.

  • We started off this whole thing when I said Let's face it.

  • And what does?

  • Let's face it mean?

  • Well, let's put it here because that's the face, right?

  • It means to look at something as it is to look at it as it really is, right?

  • When you have to face something, you take your face, you put it at it and go Well, that's it.

  • There.

  • I'm not going to embellish, which means to make more of something, make it more than it really is.

  • I'm just going to tell you as it is.

  • And let's face it, this was a pretty damn good lesson, because I took the one thing you carry everywhere you go and you're gonna remember certain things, right?

  • Don't be, lippy.

  • Don't play with them lips.

  • Don't be lippy, right?

  • I could have given you nosy, you know, nosy.

  • That's another time.

  • But you're gonna look for things of good value, right?

  • And look for because you have a nose for value.

  • That's why you're studying in England.

  • What else are you here, right?

  • Don't pay through.

  • The nose were free, for God's sakes.

  • You don't pay anything, right?

  • And you're making headway in your English, right?

  • You're getting better just by me going through these.

  • And I was like, Yeah, I get it.

  • I understand my head.

  • I'm moving forward, right?

  • Of course, it's going to put a lot on your mind.

  • It's a new language.

  • It makes you think, but this is good thinking causes you to grow.

  • I know what's on the tip of your tongue.