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  • [DRAMATIC MUSIC]

  • [RELAXED MUSIC]

  • [ETHEREAL RUMBLING]

  • [ROARS]

  • - What, you've never seen a brother

  • come out of an interdimensional wormhole before?

  • Time is merely a concept, a state of mind.

  • And it's time.

  • Time to get Black, y'all.

  • Greetings, salutations, and Obama-style fist bumps.

  • Is your guy, Craig Robinson, reporting

  • live from my Cabin of Solitude.

  • I decided to set up shop here while the world chills out.

  • I had to get off the grid for a while.

  • But when the boy, Brandon Drew Jordan Pierce,

  • called and asked me to pilot this hypothetical twin engine

  • jumbo jet of epic Black excellence,

  • I gladly welcomed the opportunity and the cameras

  • into my world.

  • Now, this season, we've got connections mapped out all

  • across this Black planet.

  • Speaking of Black planet, if anyone

  • knows how to get my old Black Planet profile taken down,

  • I still can't seem to get it deleted.

  • It's time to put username CraigRobIsASnobWithAProb2345

  • to rest.

  • You know what I'm saying?

  • Back to the show.

  • [ENGINE WINDS UP]

  • This season, we'll be traveling from Houston to Brooklyn,

  • Africa to Japan, and telling stories of all types of places,

  • spaces, and Black folks that are changing

  • perceptions of Black potential and accomplishment

  • on a daily basis.

  • Oh, and it turns out, for this episode,

  • the ladies do run this mother, because we're

  • starting this season off with an all-female roster today.

  • So let's sit back, relax, and enjoy the show.

  • [ENGINE WINDS DOWN] Ay, LEON.

  • [ELECTRONIC BEEPS]

  • Play something I can get my read on to.

  • ALEON: Uh, before we even get to that,

  • you gotta set up the first segment, dawg.

  • - Thanks, ALEON.

  • My personal Black smart home device.

  • This cabin life got me off my game for a second.

  • [ELECTRONIC BEEPS]

  • ALEON: Happens to the best of us, Brother Craig.

  • - The great orator, Lavell William Crump,

  • famously known as David Banner, once said,

  • "Stuntin' is a habit.

  • Get like me."

  • Well, our first guest takes that quite literally.

  • As a rarity in Hollywood, Black female

  • stuntwomen Jazzy Ellis is cementing

  • herself as a go-to artist.

  • Not just because she's Black or female,

  • but because she's real, real, real, real, real, real,

  • real good at what she does.

  • Her IMDb actually gave me whiplash when I read it.

  • She's worked on "The Suicide Squad," "Lovecraft Country,"

  • "The Walking Dead," "Avengers - Infinity War," "Bad Boys

  • for Life," and my personal favorite, "Hot Tub Time Machine

  • 2," which I hear is strongly being considered

  • for the Criterion Collection.

  • But with all that said, let's let her stunt.

  • Your attention, please.

  • Meet Jazzy Ellis.

  • VOICE OVER MEGAPHONE: Your attention, please.

  • JAZZY ELLIS: I have been a warrior, a zombie, a witch,

  • a mercenary, an evil nun, a special ops soldier,

  • and I was once tackled by Jason Statham.

  • I'm Jazzy Ellis, and I'm a professional stunt actor.

  • There are not enough women and people of color doing stunts.

  • So if you want to do it, do it.

  • I'll help.

  • I'll tell you what it takes.

  • But first, stunting is dangerous.

  • Don't try this at home.

  • Talk to your doctor if stunting is right for you, yada, yada,

  • yada.

  • There's no one way to be a stuntperson.

  • The best I can do is tell you the path I took

  • and tell you to make it your own.

  • So let's see.

  • Step one, you have to break it to your parents

  • that you're not going to be a doctor.

  • I know now that I made the right choice.

  • And, to their credit, my parents are my biggest supporters.

  • Actually, before you dash your loved ones hopes for you,

  • make sure you can move.

  • If you're going to be the person being thrown through a door,

  • you have to know how to make it look painful when it isn't.

  • I mean, usually it isn't.

  • Anyway, I started taking ballet when I was three.

  • If you're not three, that's OK.

  • It's never too late to start.

  • I also did jazz dancing, gymnastics, and break dancing.

  • So you've got options.

  • I was actually really shy as a kid,

  • and dancing helped me learn to love performing as

  • long as I was part of a group.

  • And that's tip number three.

  • Get yourself a squad.

  • This is not optional.

  • I would not be where I am today without the many people who

  • supported me.

  • People like my mentor, Angela Meryl.

  • I would literally call her once a week.

  • She always got back to me when I needed

  • advice from an experienced Black woman in the industry.

  • Did you know it used to be standard practice

  • to put men in wigs to be stunt doubles for women?

  • Or that white stunt performers would

  • be painted down, basically put in Blackface--

  • do not draw that--

  • to double for actors of color?

  • The excuse was always that producers

  • and directors couldn't find women or people of color.

  • I've worked really hard so that they

  • don't have that excuse anymore.

  • Five years ago, there were probably

  • five Black stuntwomen in Atlanta,

  • which is a major film location.

  • But now there's about 50, because now there's a need.

  • And there's a need because we've proven ourselves.

  • And I'm proud to be part of that.

  • I was a high school math and special education

  • teacher in New Orleans.

  • I loved the creativity and energy of New Orleans,

  • but I wasn't a part of it.

  • So I started doing martial arts.

  • I met some stunt performers in my martial arts class,

  • and one of them, my dear friend John Bernacker, said,

  • you could be a stunt performer.

  • There are no Black stuntwomen here.

  • You could be the Black stuntwoman in Louisiana.

  • I was like, what?

  • From my very first training with John,

  • he wanted me to understand what it really felt

  • like to be a pro stuntperson.

  • Remember how I said stunting is dangerous?

  • It takes training with professionals to do it safely.

  • John made sure I was learning how to properly falling

  • into a flat back and a taco.

  • Well, some people call it tiger.

  • I guess you kind of start off like a tiger,

  • and then end up like a taco.

  • Oh, yeah.

  • Get ready to learn a new language.

  • When a stunt coordinator says, make sure you have your jerk

  • vest, I know it'll be a fun day, because that

  • means a day of flying.

  • Maybe even explosive.

  • Yes.

  • I specialize in wire work, and for that, I need a jerk vest.

  • It helped me fly 40 feet across the set of "Godzilla -

  • King of the Monsters."

  • It also helped me fall 50 feet for a scene

  • in "Lovecraft Country."

  • Oh, I can't name the movie.

  • It's coming out this year.

  • But for that one, I got to fall 100 feet from the ceiling.

  • Flying, explosions, monster lizards.

  • I guess tip number--

  • what are we on now?

  • Five?

  • Five.

  • Have a sense of adventure.

  • Even though this was who I was before I became a stuntperson,

  • I didn't realize that this was who

  • I wanted to be until the option was right in front of me.

  • So I dove in and trained non-stop for three months.

  • Hold up.

  • It takes more than three months to learn to be a stuntperson.

  • I was already an expert in movement and defying gravity.

  • I networked a lot and had the whole right place, right time

  • thing working for me.

  • On that note, stay ready so you can

  • say yes to the right opportunities

  • when they come your way.

  • As a stunt performer, you're an athlete and an artist.

  • Take care of your most important tool of the trade--

  • yourself.

  • People say YOLO.

  • I say YOGO--

  • You Only Get One.

  • You only get one body, so treat it with care.

  • My goal is to be an action star someday.

  • Pam Grier started it, but there still aren't

  • enough women doing it today.

  • And I'm pretty sure it's not for lack of trying.

  • There are a lot of cool female characters

  • waiting to come to life.

  • I'm ready to be like the female Luke Cage.

  • A badass Black woman who saves her community.

  • So if you're ready to be like Jazzy Ellis,

  • find something to be your thing.

  • Do you ride horses?

  • Are you an amazing grappler?

  • Are you, like, a parkour champion?

  • Find a thing you can do, and do it well.

  • Be ready to fall, over and over.

  • Literally.

  • You'll have to do, like, 28 takes in one day.

  • Believe in yourself.

  • And if someone asks if Jason Statham can tackle you,

  • say yes.

  • VOICE OVER MEGAPHONE: Your attention, please.

  • [CARS HONKING]

  • - How'd they find me out here?

  • I thought I was in the cut.

  • I'm not entirely sure Jazzy has right name, y'all.

  • Because she is clearly a rock star.

  • And not like waiting room at the dentist's

  • office soft sleepy rock.

  • I'm talking heavy metal, sold out arena rock.

  • Jazzy, I'll see you on set.

  • [TRUCK HONKS]

  • [TIRES SCREECHING]

  • [BREATHING HEAVILY]

  • Oh yeah, Craig.

  • Nobody knows where that cabin is.

  • [GROWLS] It's a cabin, they said.

  • No one will find me, they said.

  • Well, they did find me.

  • [NERVOUS BREATHING] I gotta go get this WAP.

  • Warm-Ass Pastry.

  • [PANTING]

  • Whew.

  • Traffic was crazy.

  • I never should've left the cabin.

  • But I needed these pastries.

  • [SIGHS]

  • OK, let me break down a hypothetical here.

  • Let's say there was a secret lab, and in that lab

  • there was a human hybridization chamber.

  • Now, into that chamber walks a cop, a quarterback,

  • and a national champion.

  • A scientist at the lab presses a button, and lots of stuff

  • happens, all right?

  • The scientist opens the door, and out walks our next subject,

  • Jennifer King, who just so happens

  • to have been a cop, a quarterback,

  • and a national champion, and is now

  • the first African-American woman to be a full-time NFL

  • assistant coach as part of the Washington football team staff.

  • There's nothing left to do now but sit back, relax,

  • and hut, hut, hike!

  • Your attention, please.

  • Meet Jennifer King.

  • VOICE OVER MEGAPHONE: Your attention, please.

  • [BASSY MUSIC]

  • JENNIFER KING: I think football kind of touches all my senses.

  • I have a routine I like to do.

  • I like to smell the ball before the game, you know?

  • I like to have it in my hands and smell the leather.

  • It's just some I've always done from when I was playing.

  • I still do it as a coach, as well.

  • You know, the sounds of football.

  • It's so many different sounds from the paths hitting