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  • the United States says there is no reason for tensions between China and Taiwan to escalate to confrontation.

  • The remarks come as a senior Chinese official warned that any moves towards Taiwan independence could mean war.

  • The sharpened rhetoric from Beijing matches increased military activity, bites forces against Taiwan.

  • The aim, analysts believe, is to place a new U.

  • S administration and Taiwan on check.

  • Taiwanese air force pilots are on high alert.

  • This may be just a simulated drill to show how fast they can take to the skies, but in recent months they've been doing it for riel.

  • The president laid bare the threat from their nearest neighbor.

  • In the past year, our radar stations have detected the incursions of nearly 2000 Chinese military aircrafts on over 400 vessels.

  • That's allowed us to intercept and drive them away on secure our maritime and air space.

  • A record number of incursions came on January 23rd.

  • China sent 13 warplanes into Taiwanese airspace.

  • Taiwan scrambled fighter jets to monitor the activity.

  • A day later, China sent a further 16 aircraft into their airspace.

  • Over that weekend, the United States sent two carrier strike group into the south China Sea on what it called routine operations to ensure freedom of the seas.

  • On the urge China to cease its pressure on Taiwan, Beijing called on the US to respect the one China policy.

  • Three US frequently sends vessels and aircraft to enter the South China Sea.

  • Their activities are a sure force are not conducive to the peace and stability of the region.

  • Analysts say the escalating tension is part of China's efforts to flex its muscles for China, Taiwan, and regaining so called regaining control over Taiwan is probably most important strategic priority.

  • Meanwhile, Taiwan hopes drills like these reassure the public that no matter the aggression they face, the island is prepared.

  • Now let's get more on this from Professor Steve Tsang.

  • He's director of the China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University Off London.

  • Professor Sang Welcome.

  • Ah, senior Chinese official has warned that any moves by Taiwan towards independence would lead to war.

  • Talk to us a bit about the timing off this very sharp rhetoric.

  • Why now?

  • I think that is because off the change of government in Washington, the Chinese government would have expected or hoped that the Biden administration would reversed US policy on Taiwan.

  • The Biden administration has not done so, so the Chinese want to fire a short across the about off the Americans as it were.

  • And how does the Americans How does the Biden administration intend to deal exactly with China, especially on the question of Taiwan?

  • Do you buy?

  • The administration is fairly clear that it will take a robust positions on Taiwan, but it is willing to negotiate and work with the Chinese if the Chinese are willing to reciprocate and work with the Americans.

  • So the Trump administration was very unreliable and erotic.

  • The Biden administration can be expected to be very consistent.

  • Neither is something that the Chinese like to see.

  • Now the US is bound by the Taiwan Relations Act to essentially provide Taiwan with the weapons to defend itself against any Chinese attack, but not to necessarily come to Taiwan's aid militarily.

  • Do you think it is time potentially the US consider demanding that okay, The Taiwan Relations Act does not required the United States government to immediately interfere on behalf off Taiwan if Taiwan should be attack.

  • But if you look at the former U.

  • S Republic of China or Taiwan Mutual Defense Pact off 1955.

  • The provision off that treaty also does not trigger an immediate American military response.

  • If Taiwan should come under attack, it really immediately requires the U.

  • S government to take the matters to Congress.

  • It is very similar under the Taiwan Relations Act, so it is not really necessary for the Americans to change policy and say that, yes, if Taiwan comes under attack, we definitely will immediately interfere.

  • Um, the situation is already under control.

  • But then, given that there is no commitment off immediate US help militarily on the side off Taiwan, how does Taiwan defend itself in the event off an invasion or, um, attack?

  • Well, the refusal off the Americans to be completely clear is intended to deter any government in Taiwan from pushing the envelope too far and, for example, formally assert day jury independence, which which would trigger a Chinese military invasion.

  • But anything short off that the Taiwanese will know that the Americans have very, very strong strategic interest in making sure that Taiwan's does not change hand and become Chinese on the main reason there is because if Taiwan were taken by the Chinese by falls, with the Americans being deterred or defeated.

  • Then the Japanese will no longer trust the Americans.

  • Protection off Japan's security and the entire Americans into Pacific strategy would collapse.

  • And that is the reason why three chance off the Americans not interfering, is in fact relatively low right.

  • We'll leave it there for the time being.

  • But thank you so much for joining US professor Steve Tsang from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.

  • Thank you so much.

  • You're welcome.

  • Ah, shrinking space for free speech and continuing political upheaval is forcing many young Hong Kongers to look for opportunities elsewhere.

  • Taiwan has, over the years being a favored destination for many.

  • But now the island is planning to make it easier for students under the age of 18 to come to the island on their own for high school studies.

  • Earlier, they needed an adult to accompany them.

  • University students from Hong Kong, already studying in Taiwan, believe it's a change for the better one that allows students to escape the turmoil at home.

  • Amy is safe here.

  • She's studying at the Taipei University.

  • The Hong Kong authorities cannot reach her.

  • Things are better here, but she suffers from post traumatic stress.

  • E feel guilty.

  • I survived.

  • We used to chant together.

  • We stand, but I got out and left them behind in Hong Kong.

  • Sometimes I wish I'd been arrested too.

  • So we could face the hardships together.

  • Why am I enjoying life here when all my friends are in jail?

  • Uh huh.

  • Those friends were with her at the protest back in 2019.

  • Many off them are facing charges like rioting and to go to jail for a long time.

  • That was something she feared to getting into a Taiwanese university seemed like her only chance to escape.

  • E lived in hiding in Hong Kong for six months while I prepared for the Taiwan University entrance exam.

  • Now I have freedom and peace here.

  • I no longer live in fear.

  • I don't need to text my friend every hour to say I'm safe.

  • E Taiwan is only an hour's flight from Hong Kong is enough for university students to reach.

  • But high school students must be with their parents or have a residence permit.

  • Zachary is stuck in Hong Kong.

  • He took part in the protests, which led to a split with his parents, his too young to go to Taiwan alone.

  • E was very disappointed when the high schools in Taiwan said they couldn't accept me.

  • I don't understand why they take university students, but not high school students.

  • It's frustrating, and I feel unsafe here.

  • E.

  • As Hong Kong becomes more dangerous for pro democracy campaigners, Taiwan is planning to change the rules.

  • This would allow high school students to move there alone.

  • School officials could become their legal guardians.

  • E hope The new policy will take effect this year so I can finish my last year of high school in Taiwan.

  • I don't want to do the university entrance exam here.

  • Who knows what would happen if I wrote something politically incorrect?

  • You could get arrested for no reason.

  • Now, under the National Security law in Hong Kong, life in Taipei can be lonely.

  • For Hong Kongers, the culture and spoken language are different.

  • So it's the food.

  • Amy often comes to this Hong Kong cafe for a taste of home.

  • O E.

  • Come here to remind myself that I'm a Hong Konger.

  • I don't think I could go back while it's under communist rule.

  • I might live in Taiwan for the next 10, 20 even 30 years.

  • Home is always on her mind, her friends who are already in prison and those who are too young to leave.

  • Just like me.

  • Many Hong Kong protesters are young, Many of them are still in high school, and they need to wait for 2 to 3 years until they're eligible to study here.

  • Can you imagine how dangerous it is for them personally?

  • Mercy.

  • New York's off mutual support between political exiles offer some comfort, but they cannot reach the young teenager stock back in Hong Kong.

the United States says there is no reason for tensions between China and Taiwan to escalate to confrontation.

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US offers Taiwan support after Chinese military incursions | DW News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/01/29
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