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  • I am thrilled to see so many people here on a Thursday evening.

  • And I actually, just so that we can understand our marketing efforts a little

  • bit better, I would love to know, just a show of hands, Stanford GSB students.

  • If I could see where the GSB students are?

  • Excellent, excellent.

  • Greetings in the balcony.

  • Stanford undergrad students, welcome.

  • We love having you here.

  • Members of the rest of the Stanford

  • community, faculty, staff, alumni, that sort of thing.

  • And from the Harvard community, who has joined us besides our speaker?

  • Welcome.

  • We are delighted that you are here.

  • Tonight is a chance for two great schools to come together.

  • And, we are delighted for the evening, that we are going to spend with you.

  • My name is J.D. Schraum.

  • I'm a faculty member here at the GSB.

  • I teach courses in Communication, and I also

  • have the privilege of leading the Mastering Communication Initiative.

  • Which is is a series of non-credit offerings to help

  • students build their abilities to speak, write, and participate more effectively.

  • Behind me you will see some of the events

  • that are coming up through the rest of quarter.

  • If you don't have the moment to write them down quickly, you can go to our

  • website, which is simply gsb.stanford.edu\mastery, and that will

  • open up the world of mastering communication to you.

  • When we were looking for a speaker for this evening, we really wanted to

  • find somebody who had made their success

  • because of their ability to communicate effectively.

  • And, last year I had the privilege of seeing Salcon at the TED Conference.

  • Saw him speak at a company here in the Bay

  • area, and we began our dialog to have him come in.

  • Before I introduce the student who will introduce Sal to you, there's one

  • event in particular that I wanna be sure that I mention to you.

  • And that is, that we have a viewing of the TED Conference this year.

  • It will happen from February 28th to March 2nd, and we have

  • a site license, to broadcast the full TED Conference, here to the GSB.

  • To our GSB students, I encourage you to sign up by going to our website.

  • You'll also see information about it, in the

  • distributions that come out to you, through email.

  • But that is, we're excited about having that event here.

  • You did not come here tonight to hear from a professor.

  • You came to hear from an entrepreneur.

  • And so to introduce him, I'm delighted to welcome to the stage Luke Pena.

  • Luke is a second year MBA student in the joint degree

  • program, between the School of Ed and the School of Business.

  • And Luke, if you could come forward.

  • >> [SOUND].

  • >> From age eight to age 13, my home was my classroom.

  • And I was my own teacher.

  • Now I have the privilege of standing before

  • you as Luke Pena, joint MBA MA Education degree

  • student, Co-President of the Stanford Education Club, and proof

  • that non-traditional students can find the path to success.

  • It's my great honor and privilege to welcome you all here tonight.

  • And my responsibility to remind you to please not

  • use your cell phones and computers during tonight's event.

  • Back to the classroom of my youth.

  • I was a hyperactive child with a hyperactive mind.

  • Traditional schools evaluated me and determined that I

  • would require either medication, or special education courses.

  • My mother disagreed.

  • So my mother decided to homeschool me, and

  • serving as my teacher through the fifth grade.

  • I took tests every year to make sure that I was performing

  • at or above the level of my peer group in traditional schools.

  • When my mother decided to return to undergraduate school

  • to pursue her degree, I became my own teacher.

  • And for the next five years I relied on

  • a variety of non-traditional education resources to guide my learning.

  • Without access to these resources, I would

  • never have found my own passion for education.

  • I would have never survived grade school, and I

  • would never have found my way here to Stanford.

  • I know that there are countless

  • other students, traditional and non-traditional, who require

  • and desire and desperately need these innovative

  • resources to create their own education opportunities.

  • Khan Academy is creating these very

  • opportunities for students around the globe.

  • Along the way, Khan Academy is redefining the very

  • way we think about teaching, about learning, and about education.

  • The organization is committed to changing education for the

  • better by providing a free, world-class education anywhere, anytime.

  • The Khan Academy website now provides self-pacing

  • software and includes over 3,000 instructional videos

  • on its YouTube channel, covering everything from

  • basic arithmetic to college-level science and economics.

  • It's the most used library of educational videos on the web with 3.7 million

  • unique students per month, over 88 million

  • lessons delivered, and over 260 million exercises completed.

  • A growing number of classrooms around the world are relying on Khan Academy to

  • build student mastery of topics, and to

  • create space in class for dynamic, project-based learning.

  • Khan Academy owes its success to its founder Salman Khan.

  • Khan was helping a young cousin with math in

  • 2004, communicating by phone and using an interactive notepad.

  • When others expressed interest, he began posting his

  • hand-scribbled tutorials on YouTube, and demand took off.

  • Before founding Khan Academy, he was the portfolio manager at

  • Khan Capital Management, and the Senior Analyst at Wall Capital Management.

  • Sal received his MBA from Harvard Business School,

  • where he was president of the student body.

  • He also holds a Masters in electrical engineering

  • and computer science, a BS in electrical engineering and

  • computer science, and a BS in mathematics from MIT,

  • where he was president of the class of 1998.

  • While at MIT, Sal was the recipient of the [UNKNOWN] Fellowship,

  • which he used to develop web-based math software for children with ADHD.

  • Children not unlike myself.

  • Ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming Sal Khan.

  • >> [SOUND].

  • >> Thank you much.

  • This is very exciting.

  • So, so how many of ya'll have been to the site, or used the site and, in some way?

  • Oh good.

  • So this is a good, good, good audience.

  • So I guess, how many of you have not been to the site?

  • Oh good, so, so I have something to show you.

  • So for those of you that have not been to the site,

  • I have a little montage that shows what, what the videos look like.

  • But what we'll see over the course of this, and I

  • actually do wanna make it as much of a conversation as possible.

  • There's microphones and all the rest.

  • I'm gonna talk for, I don't know, ten or 15 minutes.

  • And then I just wanna have questions, comments, anything else.

  • But we'll see, Khan Academy is much more than just a library of videos that

  • initially I started creating, and now we have

  • a few other people working on as well.

  • But let me just show, oh yes.

  • >> One moment to handle a technical issue.

  • >> Alright that wasn't too bad.

  • >> That was the pre-show music.

  • >> Oh, oh, okay, there's other things happening in the background.

  • Okay, alright, very good.

  • So here we go.

  • >> We can integrate over the surface and the notation usually is a capital sigma.

  • All these interactions are just due to gravity

  • over interstellar, or almost you could call it intergalactic.

  • So the right slot is i plus 1.

  • This animal's fossils are only found in this area of South America.

  • Nice clean band here.

  • They create the Committee of Public Safety,

  • which sounds like a very nice committee.

  • Notice, this is an aldehyde, and it's an alcohol.

  • >> It's some type of infectious disease.

  • >> Exactly so the key is, when you start to look

  • at data, you have to look at all aspects of it.

  • >> [UNKNOWN] is their $30 million, plus

  • the $20 million from the American manufacturer.

  • If this does not blow your mind, then you have no emotion.

  • >> [LAUGH].

  • >> Well-educated audience.

  • You appreciate Euler's identity and The French Revolution, that's very good.

  • So just to get you up to speed, and a

  • little bit of this was covered in the introduction, and this,

  • this slide, and actually some of the data from the

  • introduction was a few months old, and this is old, too.

  • What we're actually now pushing about five million unique students a month.

  • They're doing two million exercises a day, actually, and, and, and growing.

  • And you know, out in Silicon Valley we get used to a million here, million there.

  • Oh, you know, that's not so exciting until you get to ten million or whatever else.

  • But, but in education these really are large numbers.

  • And, you know, I didn't do that to pick on Harvard,

  • but, but that is, and actually since these numbers are older

  • now that, on a monthly basis, we're serving six to seven

  • times the number of students that Harvard has served since 1636.

  • And we're growing 400% a year, so it's, you know, we'll see where that goes.

  • But before we go in kind of the present of what Khan

  • Academy's up to, I wanna talk a little bit about how it happened.

  • Cuz it's, it's, you know, I still kind of wake up in the middle of the night

  • and wonder about this very strange journey that you're

  • kind of catching me hopefully in the middle of.

  • Or maybe very close to the beginning of, hopefully.

  • It's been good so far.

  • As was introduced, 2004 I had just gotten married.

  • I was a newly minted MBA, graduated in 2003.

  • Was working in Boston as an analyst at a hedge

  • fund, and I had family visiting me from New Orleans.

  • Right after my wedding in New Jersey, they came up to Boston.

  • My 12 year old cousin, Nadia, her younger brother,

  • Arman, who's two years younger and then the youngest, Ali.

  • And I showed them all the sights in

  • Boston, and I was very impressed with Nadia.

  • I hadn't seen her since I had left from, you know, I

  • grew up in New Orleans where, since I was in high school.

  • So, she was like two or three years old, and now

  • she's 12 years old, super smart girl, and I kept encouraging her.

  • I was like oh, you know, you should think about some

  • of these fancy schools that are in town, and all the rest.

  • And her mom told me, one morning before Nadia had woken up, that this

  • is very nice, Nadia views you an older brother figure and all the rest.

  • But, she's actually having trouble with mathematics.

  • And, I, I, had trouble believing this.

  • You know this, one I, we were having conversations and she seemed

  • at least you know super, she intimidated me among half the conversations.

  • And on top with that you know, we shared a certain amount of DNA.

  • >> [LAUGH].

  • And so, so I told [UNKNOWN] Nadia's mother,

  • that, you know, I find that hard to believe.

  • And when Nadia woke up, I said, well what's going on?

  • And she said, I took a placement exam, and I, there's unit

  • conversion, ounces to gallons, kilo, you

  • know, kilometers, meters, miles, things like that.

  • And she says, I just don't get that.

  • I, you know, my brain just checks out.

  • And I told her, I was like, look Nadia,

  • I, I've had conversations with you last few days.

  • We even did, I remember these little brain teasers while

  • we were waiting for the fireworks over the Charles River.

  • And I said, all of that stuff that we've been talking

  • about is ten times deeper and more conceptual than, than units.

  • And I, I'm not saying this just as a kind of a pep talk.

  • You, you can do this.

  • And, and, you know, I think like a lot of, not just

  • children frankly, people who've disengaged with

  • some content, they appreciate the pep talk.

  • But they're like oh, okay, you know, that's nice

  • but, you know, it, it probably doesn't apply to me.

  • And so I said, well, let's make this happen.

  • You go back to New Orleans.

  • They, they still lived in New Orleans.

  • And, every day after work, I'll, we'll get on something.

  • We'll get on the conference phone and will use

  • Yahoo Doodle or something, and, and we'll work together.

  • And, and she agreed.

  • I think she was skeptical, but she says, oh, I have this cousin, kind

  • of an older brother figure who wants to spend time with me, worth a try.

  • And long story short, you know, they went back

  • to New Orleans she, she, we started working together.

  • The first month was hard, but she eventually did get past that.

  • And then we started just doing random topics, algebra here

  • and there, and she actually became an advanced math student.

  • And then I, I kind of I, I, I've

  • coined the phrase I became somewhat of a tiger cousin.

  • >> [LAUGH].

  • Perhaps better than a tiger mom.

  • And, and I called her school and I said she should retake the exam.

  • You don't understand what she's accomplished.

  • There was some resistence on that part and, and, and I'm

  • like oh then, you know, her mom isn't telling me this.

  • It's, it's i'm telling and, and but, she was able to take it, and

  • she took the exam and she ended up becoming a very advanced math student.

  • She ended up taking calculus her freshman year in high school.

  • She ended up taking math at University of New Orleans through

  • most of high school, so she became this really advanced math student.

  • That same