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  • - [Narrator] Hey there, Psych2Goers.

  • Welcome back.

  • We are so grateful for all of the love

  • and support that you've given us.

  • Your ongoing help sharing and liking

  • have helped Psych2Go continue our mission

  • to make content on psychology

  • and mental health more accessible to everyone.

  • So, thank you.

  • Now, let's continue.

  • What do you understand from the term psychotic disorder?

  • Are you familiar with the term psychosis?

  • What are some of the defining

  • features of a psychotic disorder?

  • Knowing the answer to these can be really helpful

  • in recognizing disorder early and ensuring proper treatment.

  • Here are five signs of a psychotic disorder.

  • Before we begin,

  • we would like to mention that this video

  • is created for educational purposes only

  • and is not intended to substitute a professional diagnosis.

  • If you suspect you or someone else

  • may have a psychotic disorder

  • or any mental health condition,

  • we highly advise you to seek help

  • from a qualified mental professional.

  • Now, back to the video.

  • Number one, delusions.

  • Delusions are fixed beliefs that do not change

  • even when there's evidence that goes against it.

  • The most common type is a persecutory delusion.

  • The belief that someone is out to get them.

  • There's also a grandiose delusion

  • where a person believes he or she

  • is exceptional beyond everyone else.

  • Do you know of someone who strongly

  • believed that the world would end in 2020?

  • That's an example of nihilistic delusion

  • which is where they believe a major catastrophe will occur.

  • If a person is developing any such delusions,

  • it might be a good reason to visit your therapist

  • as it can be caused by an underlying psychotic disorder.

  • Number two, hallucinations.

  • Have you ever heard of about someone

  • seeing things that others couldn't?

  • People who perceive things that are not actually there

  • may be experiencing a hallucination.

  • This could be the belief that you see a person

  • when they're really not there

  • or hear voices when there's no one talking.

  • However, it's important to note

  • that experiencing hallucinations alone

  • does not mean you have a psychotic disorder.

  • It may be a common experience,

  • especially in certain cultural contexts.

  • However, consulting a therapist

  • might be a good idea just to be sure.

  • Number three, disorganized thinking.

  • Do you remember that time we went to the amusement park?

  • Oh, I really want to study right now.

  • Maybe we should book a trip to Italy.

  • This sentence is an example of disorganized thinking.

  • Disorganized thinking is often

  • inferred from a person's speech

  • and is reflected when a person

  • constantly switches from one topic to another.

  • Another instance of disorganized thinking is derailment,

  • where a person just goes on numerous

  • and many unrelated tangents.

  • If you notice such discrepancies in speech,

  • be sure to consult with your therapist

  • to get to its root cause.

  • Number four, grossly disorganized

  • or abnormal motor behavior including catatonia.

  • Behavior is any observable action one does usually.

  • However, for those suffering from a psychotic disorder,

  • even everyday behavior becomes a challenge.

  • Deviation and behavior from the norm

  • is a major telltale sign

  • of an underlying psychotic disorder.

  • Disorganized behavior can be manifested in many ways

  • like in unpredictable agitation.

  • In one such disorder, catatonia,

  • a person has decreased reactivity to the environment.

  • They could completely stop moving

  • and remain still in a certain posture

  • for long periods of time,

  • which is called mutism and stupor.

  • Or accessibly move with no purpose,

  • which is called catatonic excitement.

  • And number five, negative symptoms.

  • It does not mean that the person is negative emotionally.

  • It's called negative because they lack features

  • that the typical person may have.

  • It refers to an absence of certain factors that

  • are present in those not suffering from a disorder.

  • For example, a person may exhibit

  • less goal directed movements called abolition,

  • or be less able to experience positive emotions

  • from pleasurable things called anhedonia.

  • A person might also show less emotional expression

  • by reducing facial contact, eye contact,

  • or movements of the hands or arms

  • that normally compliment speech.

  • These are five signs of a psychotic disorder

  • as indicated in the Diagnostic and Statistical

  • Manual of mental disorders or the DSM-V.

  • However, the purpose of this video is to inform

  • and by no means should be considered

  • as a means for self-diagnosis.

  • If you feel you or someone around you can

  • relate to any of these signs,

  • it's highly recommended that you opt for professional help.

  • If you found this video insightful,

  • be sure to like and share this video

  • with someone who might benefit from it.

  • Subscribe to Psych2Go for more content

  • and thanks for watching.

  • We'll see you soon.

- [Narrator] Hey there, Psych2Goers.

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5 Signs Of A Psychotic Disorder

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    Amy.Lin posted on 2021/01/05
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