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  • Hi, everybody.

  • Welcome to England dot com.

  • I'm Adam.

  • In today's video, I'm gonna give you some idioms and expressions that are very commonly used by native English speakers.

  • The problem with these particular idioms and expressions is that they make no sense.

  • In fact, when you see them, you'll you'll question why we use these expressions at all because they're illogical, the words themselves.

  • The idiom itself is very hard to understand.

  • I know that all idioms are a little bit hard to understand, but these ones are extra tricky because they just illogical and you understand when I start giving unit, Uh, when I start explaining what they mean, we're gonna look at Fat Chance and Slim Chance.

  • First, when someone says Fat chance, it means zero chance, no chance.

  • So let's say, for example, my friend is going.

  • He says he's going to ask his boss for a raise, and I said, I know your boss.

  • Fat chance.

  • Here he's giving you a raise means there's no way he will give you a raise.

  • He's very cheap, the boss, but then a different friend goes to says he's gonna ask his boss for a raise, and I said.

  • Your boss is he's pretty cool.

  • There's a slim chance he'll give you one.

  • There's a slim chance it's not a big chance, but there is a chance.

  • But the idea here is that fat chance, you think Very big chance, but it's actually means zero chance.

  • Slim chance, you would think.

  • Not really.

  • But there is actually some chance.

  • So it's actually the opposite of what the words suggest, which is why it's illogical why it's a little difficult to understand.

  • So let's look at some of the others clear as mud.

  • So when someone asks you, do you understand?

  • Or is it clear?

  • And you say crystal clear crystal clear means very clear.

  • I understand everything perfectly, but sometimes people will say Yeah, clear as mud.

  • But they'll say it in a very positive way in a very upbeat way.

  • But actually clear as mud means, I have no idea.

  • I really don't understand now, mud, if you know if you're not sure what mud is, if you take dirt on the ground and pour water on it, it will turn into like a brown sludge, like a thick brown liquid, obviously not very clear.

  • So technically clear as mud means it's not clear it all.

  • But the way people say it could be a little bit confusing to especially non native English speakers.

  • But even English speakers have to take an extra second to think, Do you get it or don't get it?

  • I'm not sure, because you're saying clear, But then you're saying mud.

  • So when people say this, there are being sarcastic now, sarcasm is very, very difficult to teach.

  • Sarcasm is like involved attitude.

  • You say something very opposite of what you mean, but the person who hears it very clearly understands what you mean, right.

  • I'm not going to get into it.

  • But if somebody says Yeah, clear as mud there being sarcastic, they're saying that they really don't understand, but they're saying it in a way that sounds like they do understand.

  • So it's a little bit tricky.

  • That's actually a good lesson.

  • We'll make another video for sarcasm, right as rain.

  • So when you think about rain, you're thinking about gray clouds, your thinking about being wet and cold.

  • Not a very good feeling, right, But right, as rain means very good, very good condition.

  • So I was sick for a little while, but I took some medication and now I feel right his ring.

  • I feel very good.

  • I feel in very good condition so right as rain.

  • The right is good.

  • The rain is bad, so you're not exactly sure which it is.

  • It seems a little bit illogical now.

  • This one is not exactly illogical.

  • It's just a little bit confusing.

  • I think again for non native speakers.

  • If someone says they're not a big fan of something or like not a fan of or not a big fan is another common way to say this.

  • It means that they don't like it, not a fan, just like instead of saying I don't like it, They say I'm not a fan.

  • Well, not a fan means you don't love it, but a little bit is okay, right?

  • Or I don't love it like, especially when you're talking about food.

  • Do you want to order some bacon?

  • E don't love it.

  • Well, you don't love it, but do you like it a little bit or is it just OK or no, I just don't like it.

  • But instead of saying don't like they say, don't love or not a big fan of so not really illogical, just a little bit confusing.

  • Not exactly sure what the person is saying can't help.

  • Now there's a couple of ways to use this expression.

  • You could say can't help it and it is already understood, like an action or some sort of idea person has or can't help but do something or say something or act in a particular way.

  • So, for example, my friend asked me what like, Why do you always complain about the traffic here?

  • You know, it's a you know, there's bad drivers here.

  • Why do you always complain?

  • I don't I can't help it.

  • I can't help.

  • So people think of the help is doing something good but can't help means I can't stop myself from.

  • I can't I can't not do it.

  • I must do it.

  • So that's where it's a little bit confusing because can't help means must do.

  • And that's a little bit confusing because it's a little bit opposite.

  • You have the negative, but the meaning is actually ah, positive verb.

  • If you think about it that way, I can't help but tell people what I think about them.

  • It gets me in trouble all the time.

  • So help means you're helping yourself.

  • But no, you're actually making it very bad for yourself by doing this head over heels.

  • I'm sure you've heard this idiot before, especially when people talk about falling in love.

  • So Bob is head over heels in love with Wendy.

  • But the problem is, right now my head is over my heels.

  • And if you're not sure, heels are the back bottom part of your foot.

  • Okay, so right now I'm sort of leaning on my heels, but my head is always over my heels, which must mean that I'm in love with everybody because I see you.

  • I'm head over heels.

  • I see you.

  • I'm head over heels.

  • I see you.

  • I'm head over heels.

  • But what it actually means is fall in love.

  • So, like, you go a little bit crazy like your twisting around.

  • So really, it should be heels over head in love, but it's not.

  • It's head over heels.

  • So that's a little bit, uh, illogical as well.

  • Next, we have a meteoric rise.

  • Meteoric.

  • So the word here is meteor.

  • A meteor is ah, space rock that comes into the earth's atmosphere.

  • and flies down and crashes into the ground.

  • And it creates a creator like if you if you're not sure what a creator is if you think about the moon.

  • The moon has many creators, like a little dips in the earth, so because many Meteors have hit it over billions of years, So now the idea is that some a meteor falls to the ground or falls into a planet or star or whatever.

  • But here we're talking about our rise.

  • If something experiences a meteoric rise, it's a very fast and very powerful rise, especially when we're talking about, like, popularity, right?

  • So this singer was not so well known.

  • But then some famous producer made a record for her and put it on the radio.

  • And then she became a star, but not just became a star.

  • She had a meteoric rise to the top of the celebrity a list.

  • She was nobody.

  • People heard of her.

  • And then suddenly everybody knows who she is.

  • She's world famous, very fast, very powerfully, so meteoric rise.

  • But it should be a meteoric fall.

  • But interesting Pardon my French.

  • Now here have you have to be a little bit careful when you hear somebody say Pardon my French, they're not speaking French unless they're French people.

  • But then they don't use this expression.

  • English People who use this expression are about to say some bad words or they just said some bad words and then say Pardon my French when I say bad words, I mean, like, the f word, the s word.

  • A hole in all these words, These air swear words.

  • So somebody who is a little bit more polite in a more formal situation, let's say a politician Ah, politician speaking to the media will say, Oh, like I'm a senator.

  • Let's say that Senator or he's in He's an a hole.

  • Pardon my French and they'll always say, Pardon my French means.

  • I'm sorry that I'm using a bad word, but I must use a bad word.

  • But it has nothing to do with French.

  • And pardon means like excuse.

  • Excuse me.

  • Break a leg.

  • Which is very interesting because this seems like a very bad thing to say to someone break a leg.

  • But in show business and now, in basically every situation, when you want to wish someone good luck, you can say break a leg.

  • If somebody's going for a job interview, if somebody's going for an audition, if somebody is going to give a performance, anything like that, they're going to do like a particular event.

  • You say, Okay, break a leg.

  • Which thing?

  • Which sounds like you're telling them you're hoping something bad happens to them, but actually you're wishing them good luck because so complete opposite and last one.

  • You'll actually hear this quite a lot, especially when you want two different things or you want one thing.

  • But you also want something else and they don't work together.

  • You can't have both, so you can't have your cake and eat it, too.

  • But that doesn't make sense, because if you if I have my cake, I can eat.

  • It is I have it.

  • It's mine.

  • I can eat it.

  • But no, you can have your cake or you can eat a cake, but you can't do both, which makes no sense.

  • So you can't have everything you want is basically what this idiom means.

  • Okay, so there you go a few idioms and expressions that if you're trying to learn them by yourself, you might get the opposite meaning of what that actually means.

  • So it's very important that someone explains to you the actual meanings of these expressions, and you can use them correctly.

  • Okay, now, if you wanna test your understanding of these, go to invade dot com.

  • There's a quiz there.

  • You can try to do the questions there.

  • You can also ask me any questions you have about this video in the comments section, and that's it.

  • I hope you like the video.

  • Don't forget to subscribe to my channel and ring the little bell.

  • There you will get notifications of future videos and come back soon from or hopefully useful English tips.

  • So you again soon.

  • Bye bye.

Hi, everybody.

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A2 illogical chance mud french pardon fan

??? Strange English idioms that don’t make sense

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/12/15
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