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  • let him have it.

  • There's one gift.

  • Welcome to watch Mojo.

  • And today we're counting down our picks for the top 10 most terrifying weapons in history.

  • More water, The more fire good boom!

  • This'll ist.

  • We're focusing on firsts of their kind that brought toe war new terrors.

  • We're excluding manned weapons platforms, which warrant a separate list.

  • Although the appearance of the first tanks thundering across no man's land definitely must have been terrifying.

  • Do you beg to differ on any of our picks?

  • Cry havoc in the comments.

  • Number 10 Plague bombs For people in the Middle Ages, the black death was a mysterious as it was terrifying.

  • It swept through towns and cities like an invisible hand, leaving millions dead.

  • Imagine the horror when, in 13 47 during the siege of Cafa in Crimea, warriors of the Mongol golden horde catapulted the corpses of plague victims from their own ranks over the walls.

  • According toa 1/14 century account, the attack filled the city with quote mountains of dead.

  • It was one of the earliest instances of biological warfare and may have introduced the plague into Europe.

  • Centuries later, During World War Two, the Japanese would also weaponized the disease, dropping ceramic pots that contained plagued carrying fleas in China.

  • Number nine.

  • The Gatling gun.

  • Ironically, American inventor Richard Gatling created the forerunner of the modern machine gun to reduce wartime casualties.

  • The Gatling gun could fire 100 even 200 rounds across the battlefield in the time it took an enemy.

  • Soldiers standing in the line of fire charges muzzle loading rifle and fire one 100 to 1 advantage in shots down range, he theorized.

  • The Gatling gun would quote, supersede the necessity of large armies, diminishing quote.

  • Exposure to battle.

  • Designed in 18 61 it was a crank operated, multi barrel weapon that fired 200 rounds per minute, which increased to 3000.

  • Once Gatling hooked it up to an electric motor, it was an unprecedented rate of fire.

  • Ah, whirlwind of bullets that odd, terrified and mowed down combatants.

  • Its success paved the way for the recoil operated maxim gun and ever lighter, more portable machine guns that soon became standard weapons of war number eight landmines.

  • Land mines have been called quote uniquely savage in the history of modern conventional warfare, designed to blow apart a leg or riddle bodies with metal fragments.

  • Landmines mostly name and kill civilians during peacetime.

  • The Song Dynasty used them against invading Mongols in the 13th century, but they were first used on a wide scale against tanks in World War One, with anti personnel mines soon following.

  • Suddenly, even the ground with suspect and every step could be ones last.

  • Their use in subsequent wars has left over 110 million mines remaining in the ground.

  • Today.

  • In a single year, as many as 8000 people are killed or seriously injured, many of them Children.

  • That's almost one person killed or injured every hour of every day.

  • Number seven Mustard gas?

  • Yeah, On July 12th, 1917, waves of brownish yellow gas rolled over the Allied troops at Ipra, Belgium.

  • It was the first use of mustard gas on the battlefield.

  • Soldiers at Ipra had already faced chlorine gas as well as phosgene, which was colorless and more lethal.

  • But mustard gas loomed larger in the public mind, perhaps due to its appearance and gruesome effects.

  • Rising up like ghosts from exploded artillery shells.

  • The corrosive clouds blistered skin, blinded victims and caused internal and external bleeding its use was one of the first steps down the dark road of modern chemical warfare, which saw the development of much deadlier chemical agents in the inter war years.

  • Number six Agent Orange The use of deadly chemicals in armed conflicts didn't stop with the war to end all wars or even World War two.

  • Originally known as Operation Haiti's, the U.

  • S s Operation Ranch Hand aimed to annihilate forest cover and food crops used by the Viet Cong in the Vietnam War.

  • Some 20 million gallons were sprayed on Southeast Asian jungles, fields and other targets over a nine year period from 1960 to 1971.

  • Haiti's was a better name.

  • The clouds of oily white mist that drifted down from the skies left the land dead and barren.

  • The countryside was doused in 20 million gallons of defoliants and herbicides, most notoriously Agent Orange, which left the toxic chemical dioxin lingering in soil and water sources.

  • It was later linked to cancer and crippling birth defects.

  • Number five killer drones because they never know when they're going to strike, so they just hear them buzzing all the time.

  • It keeps them up at night, and it drives them crazy.

  • Imagine a constant buzz overhead as hunter killer drones search your streets for targets.

  • It sounds like dystopian science fiction.

  • But under the Obama administration, the presence of aerial assassins over some villages in northwest Pakistan became commonplace.

  • Their use has been controversial due to the number of civilian casualties, as well as double tap strikes that have allegedly targeted rescuers.

  • Others have fired on funerals and in December 2013, a wedding convoy in Yemen.

  • Nonetheless, unmanned aerial vehicles like the U.

  • S Predator and Reaper drones have become a quintessential part of modern warfare, ushering in a new era of depersonalized remote war and edging us closer toward evermore automated weapons.

  • Number four.

  • The WEAPONS.

  • In the early hours of June 13th, 1944 Londoners woke to an ominous buzz and a trail of fire in the sky.

  • It was the first strike in a relentless barrage of the Nazis V one vengeance weapons.

  • The first guided cruise missiles in September, as countermeasures slowed the onslaught, the Nazis rolled out the V two liquid fueled ballistic rockets that were almost impossible to intercept as they plummeted from the edge of space at supersonic speed, The Nazis had eliminated the barrier of distance and created the technology behind modern intercontinental ballistic missiles.

  • From now on, death could fall without warning from clear skies anywhere and at any time.

  • Number three aerial bombs English cities had suffered aerial bombardment before the Second World War.

  • During nighttime raids in World War One, the throb of engines overhead preceded the emergence of vast airships from the dark and indiscriminate blasts that reduced homes to rubble.

  • Aerial bombs had first been used by the Austrian Empire against Venice in 18 49 dropped from unmanned balloons and from heavier than air aircraft in the Attallah, Turkish and Balkan wars.

  • Their use soon became routine and evermore devastating.

  • They were famously described by writer Kurt Vonnegut, who witnessed the British American bombing of Dresden.

  • As like the quote, earsplitting crashes of giants heels, they left the city looking quote like the moon rather than earth.

  • Number two Greek fire, a mysterious substance that, when ignited, burns bright and hot.

  • As Arab soldiers watched helplessly from their vessels during their siege of Constantinople in the late seventh century, Byzantine ships spewing fire bore down on their decks.

  • The fire was unearthly, accompanied by thunder and burning even on water.

  • Fire has long been a weapon of war.

  • But Greek fire with something new on in extinguish, a ble and devastating weapon that set ships a light, burnt soldiers alive and has been credited for the long survival of the Byzantine Empire.

  • Its composition, said to have been revealed by an angel, is now lost.

  • It may have been petroleum based similar to napalm, another sticky fire that wreaked appalling horrors on its victims.

  • Finally, the Byzantine fire ships sailed round for battle on, According to the ninth century historian Theo Phonies incinerated the Arab ships on every man aboard.

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  • Number one.

  • The Atomic bomb.

  • Now I am become death.

  • The Destroyer of Worlds.

  • These were the immortal words of physicist J.

  • Robert Oppenheimer, quoting from the bug of a Geeta after witnessing the awful power of his creation.

  • The quote was all too apt when Hiroshima was bombed on the morning of August 6 1945 residents saw a bright flash of light before the blast ripped off their skin, boiled their organs and melted their bones.

  • Solid matter began to come apart, releasing untold quantities of energy.

  • Theo Bombing of Hiroshima and then Nagasaki killed an estimated 129,000 to 226,000 people.

  • The second bomb was intended for the city of Kokura, but it was too cloudy, so the plane moved on to Nagasaki.

  • Desperately short of fuel.

  • The crew released the bomb.

  • Despite more clouds.

  • For the first time, we suddenly had the power to destroy the world.

  • In the ensuing years, nuclear weapons would become hundreds of times more powerful, fueling Cold War fears.

  • Do you agree with our picks?

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Top 10 Most Terrifying Weapons In History

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/12/04
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