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  • Hi, everybody.

  • I'm Esther.

  • Welcome to the last tense.

  • If you haven't checked out my earlier videos on the tenses,

  • please go check them out now.

  • In this video, I will talk about the future perfect continuous tense.

  • This tense can be used to describe an ongoing action

  • or situation that will last for a specified period of time in the future.

  • There's a lot to learn, so keep watching.

  • The future perfect continuous tense is used to talk about an ongoing situation

  • that will be in progress for a period of time at a specific point in time in the future.

  • Let's take a look at some examples.

  • The first sentence says,

  • 'She will have been living in Ireland for 10 years at that point.'

  • So no matter what the subject, in this case we have 'she',

  • we follow with 'will have been' and then 'verb +ing'.

  • So, 'She will have been living in Ireland …'

  • Then this sentence has the duration.

  • What period of time will this last? 'for 10 years'

  • And when?

  • Remember, we need a point in time in the future.

  • In this case, we just use a general expression, 'at that point'.

  • Here, it's not specific and that's okay.

  • We'll see some specific examples in the next sentence.

  • 'By midnight, he will have been sleeping for four hours.'

  • Here, the specific time in the future comes at the beginning of the sentence.

  • 'By midnight' And, again, we see 'will have been' +

  • verb 'ing'.

  • 'By midnight, he will have been sleeping for four hours.'.

  • Here we have 'for four hours'.

  • This shows the duration or how long this action will be in progress.

  • So, again, 'By midnight he will have been sleeping for four hours.'

  • The last sentence says, 'In June …'

  • Here, again, we have the specific time in the future at the beginning of the sentence.

  • 'In June, 'we' that's the subject.

  • 'we'll have been studying …' There's the 'verb +ing'.

  • '… at this university for four years.'

  • Here is the duration, 'for four years'.

  • Good job.

  • And let's move on.

  • Now, let's look at the negative form of the future perfect continuous tense.

  • In the affirmative form, we say 'subject' + 'will have been' and then 'verb +ing'.

  • In the negative form, however, we say, 'subject' + 'will not have been'

  • and then 'verb +ing'.

  • Let's take a look at some examples.

  • The first sentence here says,

  • 'At that point, I will not have been living in Spain for 10 years.'

  • And so you see it.

  • 'I' is the subject.

  • '… will not have been' and then 'verb +ing'.

  • In this case, 'living'.

  • The next sentence says,

  • 'He will not have been sleeping for four hours by midnight.'

  • Again, we see the 'subject' + 'will not have been' and then 'verb +ing',

  • 'sleeping'.

  • The last sentence says,

  • 'By then, we will not have been studying at this university for three years.'

  • Again, we see the 'subject' + 'we will not have been' and then 'verb +ing'

  • here, 'studying'.

  • Let's move on.

  • Now let's take a look at how to form questions in the future perfect continuous tense.

  • Here, the sentence says,

  • 'Sean will have been playing soccer for a year by December.'

  • To turn this into a question, all we have to do is switch the order of the first two

  • words.

  • So instead of 'Sean will', I can say 'Will Sean'.

  • 'Will Sean have been playing soccer for a year by December?'

  • You'll notice that the rest of the sentence stays the same.

  • I can answer by saying, 'Yes, he will have.'

  • or 'No, he will have not.'

  • The next sentence says,

  • 'They will have been working there for three months by that time.'

  • Again, I changed the order of the first two words.

  • To turn this into a question 'They will' becomes 'Will they'.

  • 'Will they have been working there for three months by that time?'

  • Again, the rest of the sentence stays the same.

  • I can answer by saying, 'Yes, they will have.'

  • or 'No, they will have not.'

  • Let's move on.

  • Now let's take a look at how to form 'WHquestions in the future perfect continuous

  • tense.

  • Take a look at the board.

  • All of these questions begin with a 'WH' word.

  • 'where' 'what'

  • 'who' and 'how long'

  • Take a look at the first question.

  • 'Where will you have been walking?'

  • To form a 'WH' question, we start with the 'WH' word, then 'will'.

  • After that, we add the subject, 'you', 'they', 'she' and 'you'.

  • After that, we add 'have been' + 'verb +ing'.

  • 'Where will you have been walking?'

  • 'What will they have been playing?'

  • 'Who will she have been talking to?'

  • and 'How long will you have been working …?'

  • There's the 'verb +ing'.

  • ' … there by the time you finish?'

  • So let's go through one more time and I'll show you how to answer these questions.

  • 'Where will you have been walking?'

  • I can answer by saying, 'I will have been walking in the park.'

  • 'What will they have been playing?'

  • 'They will have been playing video games.'

  • 'Who will she have been talking to?'

  • 'She will have been talking to her cousin.'

  • And finally,

  • 'How long will you have been working there by the time you finish?'

  • 'By the time I finish, I will have been working there for five years.'

  • Let's move on.

  • Let's start a checkup for the future perfect continuous tense.

  • Take a look at the board.

  • The first sentence says,

  • 'By 10 p.m., I _blank_ that game for three hours.'

  • I'm looking to use the verb 'play'.

  • Remember, in this tense, we need to have 'subject' + 'will have been' and then 'verb +ing'.

  • So 'By 10 p.m., I will have been playing …'

  • Again, we need 'verb +ing'.

  • '… I will have been playing that game for three hours.

  • The next sentence says,

  • 'When she gets here, he _blank_ dinner for an hour.'

  • Try to use the verb 'cook'.

  • Again, no matter what the subject, it doesn't change.

  • 'When she gets here, he will have been cooking …'

  • 'When she gets here, he will have been cooking dinner for an hour.'

  • Now, find the mistake in the next sentence.

  • 'Steve and Jan will not have be waiting for a year when it arrives.'

  • Here, we have a negative form, 'they will not have'.

  • Then we need 'been'.

  • 'They will not have been …'

  • And then the 'verb +ing' is here so that's correct.

  • 'Steve and Jan will not have been waiting for a year when it arrives.'

  • The last sentence says,

  • 'It will have been work for 10 years on January 15th.'

  • So maybe here I'm talking about a computer or a TV.

  • Maybe some kind of machine.

  • 'it' 'It will have been …'

  • I see the mistake here.

  • We need 'verb +ing'.

  • 'It will have been working for 10 years on January 15th.

  • Great job, everybody.

  • Let's move on.

  • Congratulations!

  • You have learned all 12 main English tenses.

  • It's now time to keep practicing them in your reading and your writing.

  • I hope to see you in my next videos.

  • Bye.

Hi, everybody.

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A2 verb ing sentence ing perfect continuous future perfect tense

Basic English Grammar Course | Future Perfect Continuous Tense | Learn and Practice

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