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  • (gentle music)

  • (bell rings)

  • - [Amanda] Hey, Psych2Go family.

  • Welcome back to another Psych2Go video.

  • All the love and support that you've given us

  • has aided our mission to make psychology

  • and mental health more accessible to everyone,

  • so thank you.

  • Now, let's get into the video.

  • What do you think of when you imagine a person

  • who is depressed?

  • Are you thinking of someone who looks really sad

  • or cries a lot?

  • While those may seem to be the obvious hallmarks

  • for depression, not everyone who is depressed

  • or going through a depressive episode

  • will show how they're feeling.

  • Instead, they may hide their emotions

  • and appear to look happy and cheerful.

  • As a result, this type of depression often goes undetected.

  • Before we begin, we would like to mention

  • that this video is created for educational purposes only

  • and is not intended to substitute a professional diagnosis.

  • If you suspect you may have depression

  • or any mental health condition,

  • we highly advise you to seek help

  • from a qualified mental health professional.

  • Number one, you seem cheerful, optimistic,

  • and generally happy only on the outside.

  • Are you able to get up, go to work, and interact with others

  • without showing how bad you may be feeling inside?

  • According to Heidi McKenzie,

  • a clinical psychologist practicing

  • in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,

  • smiling depression is another name

  • for high-functioning depression

  • or persistent depressive disorder.

  • This may mean that you are able to function normally

  • and go about your day like any other person,

  • even though you may be experiencing symptoms

  • of depression internally.

  • Two, you're obsessed with showing others

  • how perfect your life is on social media.

  • Do the things you post on social media

  • reflect what's happening in your actual life?

  • While it's normal to share only your best moments,

  • actively trying to create an online presence

  • to look like you're living the perfect life

  • may be harmful to your mental wellbeing.

  • Posting photos to show others how happy you are

  • when you're not in real life

  • may only serve to create a void

  • that gives smiling depression room to grow.

  • Three, you're reluctant to seek help

  • because you're concerned about appearing weak.

  • Ever heard of the saying, "Real men don't cry"?

  • Statistics have shown that men are far less likely

  • than women to seek help for mental health problems.

  • This may be because they fear being judged

  • or treated differently for their depressive symptoms.

  • As a result, they may be more likely

  • to put on a happy appearance

  • and keep their feelings to themselves.

  • Number four, you fake a smile

  • even though you're going through some big life changes.

  • Have you ever lost your job or moved to a different country?

  • As with other types of depression, smiling depression

  • can be triggered by big life changes.

  • Whether it's a breakup with a loved one

  • or the death of somebody close to you,

  • these large changes may bring about symptoms of depression

  • as well as the pressure to keep up an appearance

  • that you are unaffected.

  • Number five, you throw yourself into hobbies

  • and work to keep busy.

  • Have you found yourself working overtime lately?

  • Whether it's work, chores, or hobbies,

  • people with smiling depression may throw themselves

  • into being busy to avoid confronting how they really feel.

  • This avoidance to acknowledge and address your emotions

  • can be harmful and may lead to emotional

  • and physical burnout.

  • And number six, you struggle with denial.

  • Diagnosing people with smiling depression

  • is difficult for many reasons.

  • Firstly, some people might not even be aware

  • that they are depressed,

  • and those who are aware often refuse to or don't seek help.

  • Furthermore, according to a paper

  • from the World Health Organization,

  • smiling depression presents with conflicting symptoms

  • compared to classic depression,

  • which makes it harder to diagnose.

  • Do you know anyone who might have smiling depression?

  • Have you experienced any of the symptoms above?

  • Tell us about it in the comments below.

  • If you enjoyed this video, please like and share it

  • with others who may find it helpful too.

  • Don't forget to hit the Subscribe button

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  • All the references used are also added

  • in the description box below.

  • Thank you for watching, and we'll see you in our next video.

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B1 US depression smiling depressive mental seek mental health

6 Signs of Smiling Depression

  • 456 3
    Mahiro Kitauchi posted on 2020/11/25
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